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Appendix B Workshop Agenda Educational Paradigms for Homeland Security April 26, 2004 Keck Building, Rm. 100 500 Fifth St., N.W. Washington, DC 20001 8:00-8:10 Greetings Irwin Feller, Senior Visiting Scientist, American Association for the Advancement of Science and Workshop Committee Chair 8:10-8:20 Introduction to the Workshop Melvin Bernstein, Director, Office of University Programs, Department of Homeland Security 8:20-8:45 National Needs, University Needs, and Homeland Security Joseph B. Hellige, Vice Provost for Academic Programs, University of Southern California 8:45-9:15 FEMA Higher Education Project B. Wayne Blanchard, Higher Education Project Manager, Emergency Management Institute, Federal Emergency Management Agency 31

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32 APPENDIX B 9:15-9:30 Break 9:30-11:30 Homeland Security: A Multidisciplinary Panel Discussion Moderator: Debra Stewart, President, Council of Graduate Schools and Workshop Committee Member Stephen E. Flynn, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations Susan L. Cutter, Director, Hazards Research Laboratory, Department of Geography, University of South Carolina William L, Waugh, Jr. Professor of Public Administration, Urban Studies, and Political Science, Georgia State University Martha Crenshaw, Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor of Global Issues and Democratic Thought, Wesleyan University 11:30-1:00 Lunch and Breakout Session I Breakout groups to be chaired by the following workshop committee members: Group A (Rm. 205) Johnnie Carson, Senior Vice President, National Defense University Group B (Rm. 201) Max M. Houck, Director, Forensic Identification Program, West Virginia University Group C (Rm. 206) Heather Kiriakou, Intelligence Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations Group D (Rm. 100) Arie W. Kruglanski, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, University of Maryland Group E (Rm. 213) Monica Schoch-Spana, Senior Fellow, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Center for Biosecurity All breakout groups to discuss the following question: Are there genuine, unmet educational needs in homeland security--either in terms of workforce skills or in terms of public outreach? If so, what are they?

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33 APPENDIX B 1:00-1:30 Breakout Session I Reports Moderator: Irwin Feller, Senior Visiting Scientist, American Association for the Advancement of Science and Workshop Committee Chair 1:30-2:00 Afternoon Plenary: National Defense University (NDU) Education and the Changing National Security Environment Introductions: Johnnie Carson, Senior Vice President, NDU Plenary Presentation: Steve M. Duncan, Distinguished Fellow, and Jim M. Keagle, Vice President for Academic Affairs, NDU 2:00-3:30 Breakout Sessions II Breakout session chairs comprise the same workshop committee members as previously. Each breakout session group to be given a different list of question or issues to respond to, as follows: Group A (Johnnie Carson, Chair, Rm. 205): What do current homeland security educational programs encompass, and why are they important? What areas should such programs encompass that are not necessarily obvious? What are the differences between existing social science, political science, or natural science degree programs and potential or current homeland security curricula? Group B (Max M. Houck, Chair, Rm. 201): What kinds of careers would a university-based homeland security education prepare one for? Group C (Heather Kiriakou, Chair, Rm. 206): What parallelisms can one draw between the post-9/11 emergence of academic offerings in homeland security and the emergence of area studies, international relations, and science policy in the Cold War era?

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34 APPENDIX B Group D (Arie Kruglanski, Chair, Rm. 100) With respect to developing workforce skills, to what extent should homeland security curricula be uniform versus specialized? What core skills should all workers in this area (however it is defined) have? If there needs to be additional specialization around the core, what might be areas of specialization and how would they be integrated into the curriculum? What are the most important unanswered questions with respect to homeland security educational issues? Group E (Monica Shoch-Spana, Chair, Rm. 213) What curricular content is or should be unique to homeland security, and what is or would be a repackaging of existing material? Is homeland security inherently an emerging discipline of its own, or is it better characterized as an interdisciplinary thrust? 3:30-4:25 Breakout Session II Reports Moderator: Debra Stewart, President, Council of Graduate Schools and Workshop Committee Member 4:25-4:30 Summary Comments Melvin Bernstein, Director, Office of University Programs, Department of Homeland Security 4:30-4:35 Closing Comments Irwin Feller, Senior Visiting Scientist, American Association for the Advancement of Science and Workshop Committee Chair