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Appendix C Workshop Speaker Biographies Melvin Bernstein joined the Office of Research and Development in the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of Homeland Se- curity (DHS) on June 1, 2003, as director of university programs. Dr. Bernstein comes to DHS from Tufts University, where he is currently a research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Previ- ously, he served as professor and head of the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science at Carnegie-Mellon University; provost and then chancellor at the Illinois Institute of Technology; academic vice president and dean of the faculties at Tufts University; and most recently, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Brandeis University. Other relevant experiences includes liaison scientist at the London Office of the Office of Naval Research; member of the National Materials Advi- sory Board of the National Research Council; and panel chair of the Na- tional Research Council study, Materials Science and Engineering for the 1990s. B. Wayne Blanchard is the manager of the Federal Emergency Manage- ment Agency's Emergency Management Higher Education Project. The primary purpose of this project is to encourage and support the develop- ment of undergraduate and graduate degrees and programs in the sub- jects of hazards, disasters, and emergency management in colleges and universities across the country. Dr. Blanchard has been with the Emer- gency Management Institute since May 1994. Prior to his current assign- ment, Dr. Blanchard worked in the National Preparedness Directorate and the State and Local Programs Support Directorate. A major contribution 35

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36 APPENDIX C in these earlier years was the creation of the Family Disaster Preparedness Program, now known as the Community and Family Preparedness Pro- gram. Among Dr. Blanchard's disaster assignments have been Hurricane Andrew, the Midwest floods of 1993, and the Northridge earthquake of January 1994. As part of a citizen disaster preparedness campaign, he also produced approximately 50 videotaped public service announcements using the donated time of more than 24 Hollywood celebrities. Dr. Blanchard has a B.A. in political science and history (with honors) from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, a master's in interna- tional affairs from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in government and foreign affairs from the University of Virginia. Martha Crenshaw is the Colin and Nancy Campbell Professor of Global Issues and Democratic Thought and professor of government at Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Connecticut, where she has taught since 1974. She has written extensively on the issue of political terrorism; her first article, "The Concept of Revolutionary Terrorism," was published in the Journal of Conflict Resolution in 1972. Her recent work includes the chapter "Coercive Diplomacy and the Response to Terrorism," in The United States and Coercive Diplomacy, pub- lished by the United States Institute of Peace (2003), and "Terrorism, Strat- egies, and Grand Strategies," in The Campaign Against International Terror- ism published by Georgetown University Press (2004). She serves on the Executive Board of Women in International Security and on the Council of the American Political Science Association. She is a former president of the International Society of Political Psychology. Susan L. Cutter is a Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She is also the director of the Hazards Re- search Lab, a research and training center that integrates geographical information science with hazard analysis and management. She received her B.A. from California State University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. Dr. Cutter has been working in the risk and hazards field for more than 25 years and is a nationally recognized scholar in this field. Her primary research interests are in the area of vulnerability science--What makes people and the places in which they live vulnerable to extreme events and how is this measured and monitored? She has authored or edited 11 books and more than 75 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. Dr. Cutter is also the co-founding editor of an interdiscipli- nary journal, Environmental Hazards. In 1999, Dr. Cutter was elected as a fellow of the American Associa- tion for the Advancement of Science, a testimonial to her research accom- plishments in the field. Her stature within the discipline of geography

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37 APPENDIX C was recognized by her election as president of the Association of American Geographers in 1999-2000. She serves on many national advi- sory boards and committees, including those of the National Research Council. Stephen M. Duncan is a distinguished fellow at the National Defense University (NDU), Fort McNair, Washington, D.C. His work is focused on homeland security, military strategy and force structure, and civil-mili- tary relations. He is the author of three books on these topics. Prior to his arrival at NDU, Mr. Duncan served as the president and chief executive officer of a systems engineering and information technology company. Previously, Mr. Duncan served as assistant secretary of defense for re- serve affairs from 1997 to 1993. In this capacity he was responsible for all matters involving the reserve components, including the mobilization of the 222,000 reservists called to duty during the Persian Gulf War of 1990- 1991. From April 1989 to January 1993, Mr. Duncan also served separately as the Department of Defense coordinator for drug enforcement policy and support. In that capacity, he was responsible for all international and domestic policies and actions involving the use of the Armed Forces to carry out counterdrug missions. During his time at the Pentagon, Mr. Duncan testified in more than 50 congressional hearings on a wide range of matters related to policies in- volving the reserve components and the administration's counterdrug programs. Mr. Duncan has also served in the legal profession, both in private practice and as an assistant U.S. attorney for the federal district of Colorado. Mr. Duncan is a highly decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, a fellow of the International Society of Barristers, a member of the faculty of the National Trial Advocacy College at the University of Virginia School of Law, and a former assistant professor of naval science at Dartmouth College. Mr. Duncan holds a bachelor of science degree from the U.S. Naval Academy, a master of arts degree in American government from Dartmouth College, and a doctor of jurisprudence degree from the Uni- versity of Colorado. Stephen E. Flynn is the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, a leading expert on port and container security, and a noted authority on homeland security. Dr. Flynn serves as the principal adviser to the bipartisan congressional Port Security Caucus. In his position at the Council on Foreign Relations, Dr. Flynn directs a project on terror and the unprotected homeland. He served as director of the Office of Global Issues, National Security Coun- cil, and was a consultant to both the U.S. Commission on National Secu-

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38 APPENDIX C rity/21st Century (the Hart-Rudman commission) and the White House Office of Emergency Operations. Dr. Flynn was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Panel on Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism in Transportation and Distribution Systems in 2002. Earlier, he served as guest scholar and project co-director of the Foreign Policy Studies Program at the Brookings Institution and as adjunct fellow and project director of the Political-Mili- tary Program and the Americas Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Dr. Flynn also held a position as associate professor of international relations at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, responsible for curriculum development and instruction in international relations, national security policy, drug policy, and global policy studies. A 1982 graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Dr. Flynn retired with the rank of commander after 20 years of active duty service. Joseph B. Hellige is vice provost for academic programs, dean of the Graduate School, and professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Southern California (USC). As vice provost, Dr. Hellige serves as the senior executive officer responsible to the provost for all university academic programs. As a faculty member in the Department of Psychology, Dr. Hellige has published two books and approximately 100 articles in scholarly journals on a variety of topics in cognitive psy- chology and neuropsychology. From 1992 to 1997 he also served as the department chair, before assuming his first vice provost position as vice provost of undergraduate studies. Dr. Hellige's primary research inter- ests include information processing differences between the left and right cerebral hemispheres in humans. Dr. Hellige has been a fellow or member of numerous professional organizations, including the American Psychological Association, the Psychonomic Society, the American Psychological Society, the Interna- tional Neuropsychological Society, the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, the American Academy for the Advancement of Science, and the Ameri- can Association for Higher Education. Dr. Hellige has also been honored as Graduate Mentor of the Year by the Graduate Association of Students in Psychology at USC and has received the Albert S. Raubenheimer Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research, and Service from the College of Let- ters, Arts, and Sciences at USC. Dr. Hellige received his B.A. degree from Saint Mary's College of Minnesota and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. James M. Keagle is an expert in professional military education, currently serving as vice president for academic affairs at the National Defense University (NDU). His responsibilities include oversight of NDU's four

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39 APPENDIX C graduate-level colleges, two research institutes, three regional centers, and the NDU library, which was ranked first in the U.S. government system in 2002. His responsibilities include curriculum development, hiring and nonrenewal decisions, registrar functions, and all academic items within NDU's $100 million budget. Prior to taking the vice presidential post, Dr. Keagle served as NDU's dean for academic affairs. Dr. Keagle's familiarity with educational issues is rooted in nine years of full-time teaching for the professional military education system, in- cluding three years at the National War College as a professor of national security policy and director of Latin American studies and six years as a faculty member in the Department of Political Science at the U.S. Air Force Academy. For an overlapping 25 years, Dr. Keagle has simultaneously served as an adjunct professor for several external institutions. Early in his career, he worked in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, specializ- ing in issues related to Cuba and Bosnia. His formal education includes a Ph.D. in politics from Princeton and two M.A.s: one in politics from Princeton and a second in political science from the University of Pitts- burgh. Dr. Keagle has published two books on policy and the political process, as well as numerous articles and book reviews. William L. Waugh, Jr., is professor of public administration, urban stud- ies, and political science in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University in Atlanta. He is the author of Living with Haz- ards, Dealing with Disasters (2000), Terrorism and Emergency Management (1990), and International Terrorism (1982) and is coeditor of Disaster Man- agement in the US and Canada (1996), Cities and Disaster (1990), and Hand- book of Emergency Management (1990). Dr. Waugh has been a consultant to public, private, and nonprofit organizations and the media on dealing with terrorist threats and other disasters and increasing governmental and nongovernmental capacities for managing hazards and disasters. He has taught graduate and under- graduate courses on terrorism and emergency management for more than 25 years. He has developed courses for the Federal Emergency Manage- ment Agency, provided emergency management training programs for local agencies, and conducted studies on topics ranging from network roles in encouraging safe construction to dealing with workplace vio- lence and terrorism. He has served three times as chair of the American Society for Public Administration's Section on Emergency and Crisis Management and currently serves on the Certified Emergency Manager Commission (International Association of Emergency Managers) and the Emergency Management Accreditation Program Commission (Council of State Governments).

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