Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and NRC Staff

JOHN C. FOUNTAIN (CHAIR) is professor and head of the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University. He was formerly a professor of geochemistry at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has worked continuously on DNAPL remediation since 1987, including both lab work and field studies on using surfactants as a remediation tool at a number of different sites including military facilities (Hill Air Force Base and the Canadian Forces Base Borden), industrial sites (DuPont Plant in Corpus Christi, Texas, and the PPG plant in Lake Charles, Louisiana), and Department of Energy sites (in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio). In recent years he has concentrated on remediation of DNAPL contamination in fractured bedrock, including studies of fracture location and flow in fractures. He has served on four previous NRC committees, including the Committee on Technologies for Cleanup of Subsurface Contaminants in the DOE Weapons Complex. He received his B.S. from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

LINDA M. ABRIOLA is dean of engineering and professor of civil and environmental engineering at Tufts University. Prior to this appointment, she was the Horace Williams King Collegiate Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Her primary research focus is the integration of mathematical modeling and laboratory experiments to investigate and elucidate processes governing the transport, fate, and remediation of nonaqueous phase liquid organic contaminants in the subsurface. Dr. Abriola’s numerous professional activities have included service on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science



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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and NRC Staff JOHN C. FOUNTAIN (CHAIR) is professor and head of the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University. He was formerly a professor of geochemistry at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He has worked continuously on DNAPL remediation since 1987, including both lab work and field studies on using surfactants as a remediation tool at a number of different sites including military facilities (Hill Air Force Base and the Canadian Forces Base Borden), industrial sites (DuPont Plant in Corpus Christi, Texas, and the PPG plant in Lake Charles, Louisiana), and Department of Energy sites (in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio). In recent years he has concentrated on remediation of DNAPL contamination in fractured bedrock, including studies of fracture location and flow in fractures. He has served on four previous NRC committees, including the Committee on Technologies for Cleanup of Subsurface Contaminants in the DOE Weapons Complex. He received his B.S. from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Santa Barbara. LINDA M. ABRIOLA is dean of engineering and professor of civil and environmental engineering at Tufts University. Prior to this appointment, she was the Horace Williams King Collegiate Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Michigan. Her primary research focus is the integration of mathematical modeling and laboratory experiments to investigate and elucidate processes governing the transport, fate, and remediation of nonaqueous phase liquid organic contaminants in the subsurface. Dr. Abriola’s numerous professional activities have included service on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation Advisory Board, the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board, and the U.S. Department of Energy’s NABIR (Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research) Advisory Committee. Dr. Abriola served on the NRC’s Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, which was the first NRC committee to investigate the efficacy of pump-and-treat technologies. An author of more than 100 refereed publications, Dr. Abriola has been the recipient of a number of awards, including the Association for Women Geoscientists’ Outstanding Educator Award (1996) and the National Ground Water Association’s Distinguished Darcy Lectureship (1996). She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Abriola received her B.S. in civil engineering from Drexel University and her M.A., M.S., and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Princeton University. LISA M. ALVAREZ-COHEN is the Fred and Claire Sauer Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley. She received her B.S. in engineering and applied science from Harvard University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering and science from Stanford University. Her current research interests are the biotransformation of contaminants in the subsurface, including chlorinated solvents, MTBE, and NDMA, and innovative methods for evaluating in situ bioremediation, including molecular biology, isotope use, and direct microscopy. Part of her research on natural attenuation took place at Alameda Point Naval Air Station. Dr. Alvarez-Cohen is an associate editor of Environmental Engineering Science. Her previous NRC service includes the Committee on USGS Water Resources Research and the Committee on In Situ Bioremediation. MARY JO BAEDECKER is a scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey. Previously she was the chief scientist for hydrology at the USGS where she oversaw the National Research Program in the hydrologic sciences. Her research interests are the degradation and attenuation of organic contaminants in hydrologic environments. She was the Darcy Lecturer for the Association of Groundwater Scientists and Engineers in 1993 and served on the board and as chair of the Hydrogeology Division of the Geological Society of America in 1999. She has been a professorial lecturer at the George Washington University. She received an M.S. from the University of Kentucky in organic chemistry and a Ph.D. from the George Washington University in geochemistry. She served on the NRC Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives. DAVID E. ELLIS is an environmental scientist at DuPont with expertise in a wide variety of remediation technologies and field testing of these technologies. As the remediation technology leader for DuPont’s Corporate Remediation Group, he currently focuses on bioremediation, in situ treatment, sediments, explosives and unexploded ordnance, hydrogeology, and modeling. He is also on the board of

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation directors of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council, the goal of which is to advance innovative remediation technologies by identifying and overcoming regulatory barriers. Finally, he is the founder and chair of the RTDF Bioremediation Consortium, which is an industry/government consortium developing safe and effective bioremediation techniques for treating chlorinated solvent contamination. Dr. Ellis received his B.S. in geology from Allegheny College, and his M. Phil. and Ph.D. in geology and geochemistry, respectively, from Yale University. He served on the NRC Committee on Intrinsic Bioremediation. THOMAS C. HARMON is an associate professor and founding faculty member in the School of Engineering at the University of California, Merced. Prior to this, he was in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UCLA. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from Stanford University. He currently directs contaminant transport monitoring research efforts in the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS), a National Science Foundation science and technology center housed at UCLA. Dr. Harmon’s research focuses on chemical fate and transport and biogeochemical cycling in the subsurface environment. He has published recently on measuring and modeling DNAPL dissolution rates, as well as on locating DNAPL as dissolution sources using inverse modeling techniques. NANCY J. HAYDEN is an associate professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Vermont. She received her B.S. in forest biology from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and her M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Michigan State University. Her basic and applied research is in the area of remediation strategies for soils and groundwater contaminated with water-immiscible solvents (particularly alcohol flushing of DNAPLs in clay-containing porous media). She has used both bench-scale and field-scale studies to investigate the feasibility of new techniques and the optimization of technologies already in use. More recently, Dr. Hayden has become involved in research on phytoremediation and plant-based wastewater treatment systems. PETER KITANIDIS is a professor of environmental fluid mechanics and hydrology in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and (by courtesy) professor in the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, both at Stanford University. He specializes in the analysis of data, uncertainty, scale issues, and the development and implementation of mathematical models that describe flow and transport rates in the environment. He has devised methods for the analysis of spatially distributed hydrologic and water-quality data, the calibration of groundwater models, the optimization of sampling and control strategies when the available information is incomplete, and methods for the study of dilution and mixing in geologic media. He has authored or coauthored about 130

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation papers on these topics and is the author of the book Introduction to Geostatistics. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. JOEL A. MINTZ is a professor of law at the Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center. Prior to joining the faculty, he represented the federal government in litigation involving hazardous waste disposal sites that pose an imminent hazard to health or the environment. Well published in the area (he has authored four books including Environmental Law: Cases and Problems and numerous journals articles), he is considered one of the nation’s leading authorities on environmental enforcement in general. While at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), he received the bronze medal for commendable service and a special service award, and he has been listed in Who’s Who in America, Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in American Law, Who’s Who in the South and Southwest, Contemporary Authors, and the Directory of American Scholars. He received his B.A., LL.M., and J.S.D from Columbia University. JAMES M. PHELAN is a distinguished member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. Since joining Sandia in 1983, he has been involved with laboratory and field-testing of environmental technology for the characterization and restoration of polluted soils and groundwater. Most recently, he has focused on the in situ treatment of explosives in soils and groundwater, including biotreatment, chemical oxidation, and chemical reduction technologies. He has past experience with treatment of chlorinated organics by air sparging and vacuum extraction; treatment of an unlined landfill organic waste disposal cell by thermal enhanced vapor extraction; and technology program management for the containment and/or treatment of radioactive/mixed-waste landfills. His explosives experience extends to environmental factors that affect chemical sensing of buried landmines and mass transfer of solid phase energetics to soil pore water. Mr. Phelan received his B.S. in environmental toxicology from the University of California Davis and an M.S. in environmental health from Colorado State University. GARY A. POPE is the director of the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has taught since 1977. He holds the Texaco Centennial Chair in petroleum engineering. Previously, he worked in production research at Shell Development Company for five years. Dr. Pope earned a Ph.D. from Rice University and a B.S. from Oklahoma State University, both in chemical engineering. His teaching and research are in the areas of chemical and thermal methods of source zone removal, groundwater modeling, groundwater tracers, enhanced oil recovery, chemical thermodynamics, reservoir engineering, and reservoir simulation. He has authored or coauthored more than 200 technical papers on these research subjects and has supervised more than 100 graduate students at the University of Texas. Dr. Pope was elected

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation to the National Academy of Engineering in 1999 for his contributions to understanding multiphase flow and transport in porous media and applications of these principles to improved oil recovery and aquifer remediation. DAVID A. SABATINI is a professor and is the Sun Company Chair of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science; the director of the Environmental and Ground Water Institute; and the associate director of the Institute for Applied Surfactant Research—all at the University of Oklahoma. His areas of research include subsurface transport and fate processes, subsurface remediation technologies, development of environmentally friendly products and processes, and innovative educational methods. He is also a partner at Surfactant Associates, Inc., and the cofounder and coprincipal at Surbec Environmental, which designs and implements innovative subsurface remediation technologies. He has served as an associate editor for Ground Water, Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, and Journal of Surfactants and Detergents. Dr. Sabatini received his B.S. from the University of Illinois, his M.S. from Memphis State University, and his Ph.D. from Iowa State University, all in civil engineering. THOMAS C. SALE is an assistant professor in civil engineering at Colorado State University and an independent consulting hydrogeologist. He has been actively involved in the characterization and remediation of subsurface releases of NAPLs since 1981. In the early 1980s Dr. Sale worked on the design, construction, and operation of free product recovery systems at petroleum refineries in the central United States using water flooding and horizontal drains. During his ten years with CH2M HILL, his primary focus was on characterization and mitigation of risks posed by subsurface contaminants and development of groundwater resources. He is currently working as a consultant at DOE’s Rocky Flats Facility near Golden, Colorado (solvents contamination) and at six major U.S. refineries where the technical practicability of mobile NAPL recovery and appropriate endpoints for mobile NAPL recovery systems are issues. Dr. Sale received his Ph.D. from Colorado State University, his M.S. in watershed hydrology from the University of Arizona, and B.A. degrees in geology and chemistry from Miami University, Ohio. BRENT E. SLEEP is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Toronto. He received his B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., and Ph.D. from the University of Waterloo. Dr. Sleep’s expertise is in the thermal treatment of organics in the subsurface, particularly via steam and hot air injection and thermal extraction. He also has experience with the sequential in situ bioremediation of solvents in soil and groundwater and with in situ chemical oxidation followed by bioaugmentation. His research includes lab-scale and pilot-scale experiments in both saturated and unsaturated soil systems as well as fractured rock. Finally, he has experience with contaminant source delineation in the subsurface using isotopes.

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation JULIE L. WILSON is a senior associate at EnviroIssues, Inc., in Portland, Oregon. She has over 20 years of experience in environmental investigation, risk assessment, and industrial hygiene/health and safety. She has managed environmental projects, including site investigations and cleanups, environmental audits for industrial and clinical facilities, and human health and ecological risk assessments for numerous sites across the country including Superfund sites, military facilities, and private industrial sites. She has worked at sites ranging from landfills to sites with organics-contaminated soil and groundwater to sediment sites. Dr. Wilson has held appointed positions in Oregon and Washington to help develop site investigation and cleanup policies and regulations. Dr. Wilson, a certified industrial hygienist, received her B.S. in biology from Michigan Technological University, her M.S. in health physics from Purdue University, and her Ph.D. in environmental medicine (toxicology) from New York University. JOHN S. YOUNG serves as a risk assessor and toxicologist with the Food and Nutrition Service of the Israeli Ministry of Health. He also holds a faculty appointment at the Institute for Earth Sciences of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was formerly the president of Hampshire Research, where he directed the development of government-sponsored risk assessment software systems for evaluation of contaminated sites and of multipathway exposure to pesticides, and served as a technical advisor for remediation at diverse contaminated sites. Prior to joining Hampshire, he served as a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Young received his B.S. in psychology from Georgetown University, his Ph.D. in psychology from Brown University, and his postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins and the Naval Medical Research Institute. He recently served on the NRC Subcommittee to Review the Updated Radioepidemiology Tables from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. KATHERINE L. YURACKO is the founder and CEO of YAHSGS, a company that provides technical, analytical, and management support services and conducts innovative research in the physical, engineering, and life sciences. YAHSGS performs research in toxicology and information technology through research grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Air Force, and Department of Energy. YAHSGS also provides services in life cycle analysis, value engineering, and strategic planning; risk analysis and risk mitigation; innovative technology application analysis; regulatory analysis and planning; and environmental cleanup. Prior to founding YAHSGS, Dr. Yuracko was director of the Center for Life Cycle Analysis at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, held positions with the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and was a Fulbright Scholar. Dr. Yuracko received her S.M. in health physics and her Nucl.E. and Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, her

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Contaminants in the Subsurface: Source Zone Assessment and Remediation M.P.P. in energy and environmental policy from Harvard University, and her A.B. in physics from Harvard University. LAURA J. EHLERS is a senior staff officer for the Water Science and Technology Board of the National Research Council. Since joining the NRC in 1997, she has served as study director for 11 committees, including the Committee to Review the New York City Watershed Management Strategy, the Committee on Riparian Zone Functioning and Strategies for Management, and the Committee on Bioavailability of Contaminants in Soils and Sediment. She received her B.S. from the California Institute of Technology, majoring in biology and engineering and applied science. She earned both an M.S.E. and a Ph.D. in environmental engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. Her dissertation, entitled RP4 Plasmid Transfer among Strains of Pseudomonas in a Biofilm, was awarded the 1998 Parsons Engineering/Association of Environmental Engineering Professors award for best doctoral thesis.