Appendix E
Committee and Staff Biographies

David Karoly (chair) is Williams Chair Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He joined the School of Meteorology faculty in January 2003 from Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, where he was Professor of Meteorology and Head of the School of Mathematical Sciences. From August 1995, he was Director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology at Monash University until it closed in June 2000. He is active in research into the dynamics of the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere and its variability on time scales from days to decades. Specific research interests include climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion and interannual climate variations due to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. He is a member of a number of international and national committees, including the World Meteorological Organization Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring and Indices, the Council of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the UCAR University Relations Committee. He was Coordinating Lead Author of the chapter “Detection of Climate Change and Attribution of Causes” in the third scientific assessment of climate change prepared by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is a Lead Author for the chapter “Assessment of Observed Changes and Responses in Natural and Managed Systems” in the IPCC Fourth Assessment report to be published in 2007. In 1993, Professor Karoly received the Meisinger Award from the AMS, with citation “for contributions to the understanding of the role of Rossby wave propagation in atmospheric teleconnections and to greenhouse climate change research.” In 1999, he was elected a Fellow of the AMS for outstanding contributions to the atmospheric sciences over a substantial period of years. He is currently a member of the NRC’s Climate Research Committee.


Judith A. Curry is Chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include remote sensing, climate of the polar regions, atmospheric modeling, and air/sea interactions. She participates in the World Meteorological Organization’s World Climate Research Program, was a member of the Science Steering Group of the Arctic Climate System (ACSYS) Program, and chairs the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Studies Working Group on Polar Clouds. She co-chaired the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) program’s Science Working Group. Dr. Curry previously served on two NRC Committees, the Polar Research Board’s Committee to Review NASA’s Polar Geophysical Data Sets and BASC’s Panel on Coastal Meteorology, and is currently a member of the Climate Research Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago.


James B. Edson is an Associate Scientist in the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research interests lie in boundary layer meteorology with a focus on surface layer turbulence and air-sea interaction. His specific research in these fields involves spectral analysis, turbulent fluxes, surface layer scaling, measurement techniques, instrumentation, motion correction, flux parameterization, humidity and gas exchange, transfer coefficients, and wind-wave interaction. He has served as chair of the American Meteorological Society’s Committee on Boundary Layers and Turbulence, and is a member of the NSF Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP) steering committee. He spent a year as an IPA at the Office of Naval Research working on the design of the Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) project. Dr. Edson received his B.S. in



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Review of the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office Appendix E Committee and Staff Biographies David Karoly (chair) is Williams Chair Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma. He joined the School of Meteorology faculty in January 2003 from Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, where he was Professor of Meteorology and Head of the School of Mathematical Sciences. From August 1995, he was Director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Southern Hemisphere Meteorology at Monash University until it closed in June 2000. He is active in research into the dynamics of the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere and its variability on time scales from days to decades. Specific research interests include climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion and interannual climate variations due to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. He is a member of a number of international and national committees, including the World Meteorological Organization Expert Team on Climate Change Detection, Monitoring and Indices, the Council of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), and the UCAR University Relations Committee. He was Coordinating Lead Author of the chapter “Detection of Climate Change and Attribution of Causes” in the third scientific assessment of climate change prepared by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He is a Lead Author for the chapter “Assessment of Observed Changes and Responses in Natural and Managed Systems” in the IPCC Fourth Assessment report to be published in 2007. In 1993, Professor Karoly received the Meisinger Award from the AMS, with citation “for contributions to the understanding of the role of Rossby wave propagation in atmospheric teleconnections and to greenhouse climate change research.” In 1999, he was elected a Fellow of the AMS for outstanding contributions to the atmospheric sciences over a substantial period of years. He is currently a member of the NRC’s Climate Research Committee. Judith A. Curry is Chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research interests include remote sensing, climate of the polar regions, atmospheric modeling, and air/sea interactions. She participates in the World Meteorological Organization’s World Climate Research Program, was a member of the Science Steering Group of the Arctic Climate System (ACSYS) Program, and chairs the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Studies Working Group on Polar Clouds. She co-chaired the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) program’s Science Working Group. Dr. Curry previously served on two NRC Committees, the Polar Research Board’s Committee to Review NASA’s Polar Geophysical Data Sets and BASC’s Panel on Coastal Meteorology, and is currently a member of the Climate Research Committee. She holds a Ph.D. in Geophysical Sciences from the University of Chicago. James B. Edson is an Associate Scientist in the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. His research interests lie in boundary layer meteorology with a focus on surface layer turbulence and air-sea interaction. His specific research in these fields involves spectral analysis, turbulent fluxes, surface layer scaling, measurement techniques, instrumentation, motion correction, flux parameterization, humidity and gas exchange, transfer coefficients, and wind-wave interaction. He has served as chair of the American Meteorological Society’s Committee on Boundary Layers and Turbulence, and is a member of the NSF Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP) steering committee. He spent a year as an IPA at the Office of Naval Research working on the design of the Coupled Boundary Layers and Air-Sea Transfer (CBLAST) project. Dr. Edson received his B.S. in

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Review of the U.S. CLIVAR Project Office physics from Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and his Ph.D. in Meteorology from Pennsylvania State University. Lynne D. Talley is a Professor of Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Talley’s expertise and research interests lie in general ocean circulation, hydrography, theory of wind-driven circulation, and ocean modeling. Dr. Talley has an extensive NRC committee background, serving currently on the Climate Research Committee and previously on the Global-Ocean-Atmosphere-Land System Panel and the Panel to Review the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). She is a UCAR trustee, a councilor of The Oceanography Society, and co-chair of the U.S. Repeat Hydrography Oversight Committee. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Talley was a National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator in 1987 and was awarded the Rosenstiel Award in 2001 and the Huntsman Award in 2003. Paul D. Try is Senior Vice President and Program Manager at Science and Technology Corporation (STC) and recent past Director of the International Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Project Office. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. Dr. Try has expertise in meteorological in-situ and remote sensors (satellite and radar), as well as data collection, processing, exchange and archival activities. Prior to joining STC, he served in the U.S. Air Force and the Office of the Secretary of Defense where he provided oversight management of all DOD research and development in environmental sciences. Dr. Try is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and was president of the AMS in 1996-97. He previously served on two NRC Committees, the Committee on NOAA NESDIS Transition from Research to Operations and the Committee on Status and Future Directions in U.S. Weather Modification Research and Operations, and he currently is a member of the NRC’s Committee on Climate Data Records from Operational Satellites: Development of a NOAA Satellite Data Utilization Plan. Hassan Virji is Deputy Director for Global Change System for Analysis, Research and Training (START), an international nongovernmental organization sponsored by the Earth Systems Science Partnership affiliated with the International Council for Science (ICSU). He has served as Executive Secretary of the U.S. Subcommittee on Global Change Research while based at the National Science Foundation (NSF), as Deputy Executive Director of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, as Associate Program Director of the Climate Dynamics Program of the NSF, and on the faculty of the University of Nairobi, Kenya. Dr. Virji received his Ph.D. in Meteorology from the University of Wisconsin. He is a member of the NRC’s Board on International Scientific Organizations and currently serves on the Climate Research Committee. Staff Julie Demuth is a Program Officer for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She received her B.S. in meteorology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her M.S. in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. Her master’s research focused on developing techniques for objectively estimating the intensity and wind structure of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and East Pacific basins using Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit data. The intensity estimation algorithm now is being run operationally by NOAA’s National Hurricane Center during the tropical season. Since joining BASC in March 2003, Julie has worked on studies involving atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials, weather modification, road weather research, and using NEXRADs sited in complex terrain for flash flood forecasting. Rob Greenway has been a project assistant at the National Academies since 1998. He received his A.B. in English and his M.Ed. in English education from the University of Georgia.