Cover Image

Not for Sale



View/Hide Left Panel

Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey

Committee Advisory to the U.S. Geological Survey

Board on Earth Sciences

Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources

National Research Council

National Academy Press
Washington, D.C.
1987



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey Committee Advisory to the U.S. Geological Survey Board on Earth Sciences Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1987

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee consisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Frank Press is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Robert M.White is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Samuel O.Thier is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and of advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Frank Press and Dr. Robert M.White are chairman and vice chairman, respectively, of the National Research Council. Support for the Committee Advisory to the U.S. Geological Survey was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (14–08–0001-A0468). Available from Board on Earth Sciences National Research Council 2101 Constitution Avenue Washington, D.C. 20418 Printed in the United States of America

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey COMMITTEE ADVISORY TO THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY M.GORDON WOLMAN, The Johns Hopkins University, Chairman G.ARTHUR BARBER, Deep Observation and Sampling of the Earth’s Continental Crust, Inc. LLOYD S.CLUFF, Pacific Gas & Electric Company ALLAN V.COX†, Stanford University DONALD J.DEPAOLO*, University of California, Los Angeles CHARLES L.DRAKE, Dartmouth College ARTHUR R.GREEN, Exxon Production Research Company PRISCILLA C.GREW*, California Public Utilities Commission (now at Minnesota Geological Survey) JOHN P.HUNT, Hunt Exploration, Inc. CARL KISSLINGER, University of Colorado MORRIS W.LEIGHTON, Illinois Geological Survey MALCOLM C.McKENNA*, American Museum of Natural History MEREDITH E.OSTROM*, Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey FRANK RICHTER, University of Chicago LEON T.SILVER, California Institute of Technology BRIAN J.SKINNER, Yale University JOHN E.TILTON, Colorado School of Mines NRC Staff WILLIAM E.BENSON JOSEPH W.BERG, JR. THOMAS M.USSELMAN U.S. Geological Survey Liaison Representatives RAYMOND D.WATTS BENJAMIN A.MORGAN, III †   Deceased *   Terms ended in 1986

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey BOARD ON EARTH SCIENCES W.GARY ERNST, University of California, Chairman P.ROBIN BRETT, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston RANDOLPH W.BROMERY, University of Massachusetts LAWRENCE M.CATHLES, Chevron Oil Field Research Co. LARRY W.FINGER, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Geophysical Laboratory ROBERT N.GINSBURG, University of Miami ALEXANDER F.H.GOETZ, University of Colorado KATE H.HADLEY, Exxon Company, U.S.A. MICHEL T.HALBOUTY, Michel T. Halbouty Energy Company JOSEPH V.SMITH, University of Chicago SEAN C.SOLOMON, Massachusetts Institute of Technology STEVEN STANLEY, The Johns Hopkins University DONALD L.TURCOTTE, Cornell University Ex-Officio Members PAUL B.BARTON, JR., U.S. Geological Survey DONALD M.HUNTEN, University of Arizona Liaison Members MIRIAM BALTUCK, National Aeronautics and Space Administration JERRY BROWN, National Science Foundation PHILIP COHEN, U.S. Geological Survey BRUCE R.DOE, U.S. Geological Survey BRUCE B.HANSHAW, 28th International Geological Congress JAMES F.HAYS, National Science Foundation JOHN G.HEACOCK, Office of Naval Research DONALD F.HEINRICHS, National Science Foundation MARVIN E.KAUFFMAN, American Geological Institute WILLIAM M.KAULA, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration BEN KELLY, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers GEORGE A.KOLSTAD, Department of Energy IAN D.MacGREGOR, National Science Foundation ANDREW MURPHY, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission DALLAS L.PECK, U.S. Geological Survey JOHN J.SCHANZ, JR., Congressional Research Service

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey SHELBY G.TILFORD, National Aeronautics and Space Administration RAYMOND G.WATTS, U.S. Geological Survey KENNETH N.WEAVER, Maryland Geological Survey ARTHUR J.ZEIZEL, Federal Emergency Management Agency JOSEPH W.BERG, JR., Staff Director

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey COMMISSION ON PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICS, AND RESOURCES NORMAN HACKERMAN, Robert A.Welch Foundation, Chairman GEORGE F.CARRIER, Harvard University DEAN E.EASTMAN, IBM, T.J.Watson Research Center MAYRE ANNE FOX, University of Texas GERHART FRIEDLANDER, Brookhaven National Laboratory LAWRENCE W.FUNKHOUSER, Chevron Corporation (retired) PHILLIP A.GRIFFITHS, Duke University J.ROSS MACDONALD, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill CHARLES J.MANKIN, University of Oklahoma PERRY L.McCARTY, Stanford University JACK E.OLIVER, Cornell University JEREMIAH P.OSTRIKER, Princeton University Observatory WILLIAM D.PHILLIPS, Mallinckrodt, Inc. DENIS J.PRAGER, MacArthur Foundation DAVID M.RAUP, University of Chicago RICHARD J.REED, University of Washington ROBERT E.SIEVERS, University of Colorado LARRY L.SMARR, National Center for Supercomputing Applications EDWARD C.STONE, JR., California Institute of Technology KARL K.TUREKIAN, Yale University GEORGE W.WETHERILL, Carnegie Institution of Washington IRVING WLADAWSKY-BERGER, IBM, Data Systems Division RAPHAEL G.KASPER, Executive Director LAWRENCE E.McCRAY, Associate Executive Director

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey Preface As a part of its continuing function of advising the Director and Chief Geologist, the Committee Advisory to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at its meeting of January 10–11, 1985, created a Subcommittee on Geologic Mapping. The decision to form the subcommittee grew from the perceptions of the committee, based on program reviews, that there appeared to be no well-defined geologic mapping program direction in the USGS and that the rate and amount of geologic mapping appeared to be declining. The subcommittee was charged to determine the status and extent of the geologic mapping program and activities in the USGS and to report back to the committee with a summary of findings and recommendations. Dr. M.E.Ostrom (chairman), Dr. Priscilla Grew, and Professor Leon T.Silver served on the subcommittee. The subcommittee is grateful to Professor Allan Cox who filled in when Dr. Grew was unable to attend Regional meetings in Denver and Menlo Park. The full committee is responsible for the contents of this report. Three meetings—in Reston, Denver, and Menlo Park—were held with representatives of the USGS offices of Regional Geology; Mineral Resources; Energy and Marine Geology; and Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering. Programs covered in these discussions included the following:

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey Office of Regional Geology Geologic Framework and Synthesis COGEOMAP Eastern, Central, and Western Geology Branch Programs Isotope Geology Program Office of Mineral Resources Wilderness CUSMAP, AMRAP Strategic and Critical Minerals BLM Lands Eastern, Central, Western, and Alaskan Branch Programs Office of Energy and Marine Geology Coal Resources Marine Geology, Pacific and Atlantic Oil & Gas Resources Energy and Minerals Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering Volcanic Hazards and Geothermal Engineering Seismology and Geology Engineering Geology and Tectonism Igneous and Geothermal Processes The subcommittee sincerely appreciates the cooperation of the USGS, the Director and his staff, and particularly Drs. Eugene Roseboom, Benjamin Morgan, and Fred Miller who helped to coordinate the agenda and the various staff inputs. We quickly recognized that we are allies in our concern for the character and prospects for geologic mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey.

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey Contents     Introduction   1     Findings and Recommendations   2     Progress Towards a National Geologic Mapping Program   7     The Role of General Geologic Mapping in Geologic Division Programs   8     Status of Geologic Mapping in the United States   18

OCR for page R1
Geologic Mapping in the U.S. Geological Survey This page intentionally left blank.