for both. Table 8-1 shows that the proportion of men ages 15-19 who report that they have had a child is extremely low: 2-3 percent in the regions for which information is available. This is much lower than the proportion of adolescent women ages 15-19 who have done so (6-21 percent). Even at ages 20-24, young men are much less likely to have made the transition to fatherhood than young women: about 25 percent have done so in Latin America, compared with twice as many young women (50-60 percent). The differential is even larger in sub-Saharan Africa, where young women are three to five times as likely to have become a parent in their early 20s as young men. By their late 20s, however, 50-65 percent of men in Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa have become fathers, although this proportion is still lower than that among women of this age (74-89 percent). Gender differences in age patterns of parenthood reflect spousal age differences, discussed in Chapter 7.

Regional Population (female)

Who Ever Had a Child, Among Women Ages:

15-19

20-24

25-29

30-34

91.7

18.4

69.9

89.1

95.1

75.2

21.1

64.4

85.8

93.6

86.0

15.2

59.8

84.7

92.7

68.4

5.6

55.1

86.1

93.9

21.0

17.3

60.5

82.4

91.2

74.1

13.9

49.8

74.7

87.5

54.9

6.8

43.5

74.1

88.4

77.8

15.2

59.2

83.6

92.3

NOTES: n.a. = not available. Regional groupings based on United Nations World Population Prospects: The 2002 Revision (United Nations, 2003b).

SOURCES: Demographic and Health Surveys tabulations from 51 countries (females) and 26 countries (males). See Appendix Table 8-1 for data from each country.



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