the eighth column of Table 8-2. These footnotes indicate that for no region in the world has a 75th percentile in the age distribution of first birth been reached by the age of 24 for women born in the 1970s. Of course, in both subregions of Latin America and the Caribbean this was true of women born in the 1950s and 1960s as well. This can be seen in the last (tenth) column of the table, which shows that, in South America, at least a quarter of women ages 40-44 were childless until past age 26. This later pattern of childbearing is also apparent in the Middle East for older cohorts. In Africa and Asia, however, 75 percent of the oldest and the middle cohorts were mothers by age 23. If this pattern had remained unchanged, we would have been able to include data in the fifth column of the table for the youngest

50th Quartile

75th Quartile

20-24

30-34

40-44

20-24

30-34

40-44

20.0

19.3

19.0

b

22.1

21.8

20.3

19.5

19.2

b

22.8

22.5

20.8

19.9

20.0

b

23.2

23.1

21.6

21.9

21.7

b

24.2

24.2

21.0

20.9

20.3

b

24.5

24.1

22.3

22.1

22.1

b

26.9

26.3

c

21.7

21.0

b

26.0

24.5

20.5

19.7

19.7

b

22.8

22.7

c

22.2

21.7

b

26.8

25.9

22.3

21.7

21.7

b

26.0

25.3

c

20.2

20.1

b

23.6

23.3

dWorld Bank income classifications.

NOTES: In order to estimate an accurate exposure time, unmarried females in the household roster were identified and censored at their age at the time of the interview plus 0.5 years. For source of regional groupings and population data for weighted averages, see Table 8-1. Further detail can be found in Appendix A.

SOURCES: Demographic and Health Surveys tabulations, see Appendix Table 8-2 for data from each country.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement