APPENDIX C
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

CYNTHIA B. LLOYD (Chair) is director of social science research in the Policy Research Division at the Population Council. She also serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on Population. Prior to her work at the Population Council, she was chief of the fertility and family planning studies section at the UN Population Division and an assistant professor of economics, Barnard College, Columbia University. Her fields of expertise include children’s schooling, transitions to adulthood, gender and population issues, and household and family demography in developing countries. Lloyd has worked on these issues extensively in Ghana, Egypt, Kenya, Pakistan, and other developing countries as well as comparatively. Her recent research has concentrated on school quality in developing countries and the relationship between school quality, school attendance, and transitions to adulthood. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Columbia University.


CARLOS E. ARAMBURÚ is the executive director of the Consorcio de Invesigacion Economica and Social (CIES) in Lima, Peru, an umbrella organization with 26 affiliates in Peru that supports research, dissemination, and training on economic and social issues related to public policies and programs. He is also the chairperson of the Board at REDESS-Jovenes, an organization focused on adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health issues. Aramburú was president of the National Population Council in Peru from 1991-1992 and again in 1996. In addition to working extensively in the policy and program arena, he is the author of numerous articles and books, including a recent coauthored book on adolescent reproductive health and



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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries APPENDIX C Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff CYNTHIA B. LLOYD (Chair) is director of social science research in the Policy Research Division at the Population Council. She also serves on the National Research Council’s Committee on Population. Prior to her work at the Population Council, she was chief of the fertility and family planning studies section at the UN Population Division and an assistant professor of economics, Barnard College, Columbia University. Her fields of expertise include children’s schooling, transitions to adulthood, gender and population issues, and household and family demography in developing countries. Lloyd has worked on these issues extensively in Ghana, Egypt, Kenya, Pakistan, and other developing countries as well as comparatively. Her recent research has concentrated on school quality in developing countries and the relationship between school quality, school attendance, and transitions to adulthood. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Columbia University. CARLOS E. ARAMBURÚ is the executive director of the Consorcio de Invesigacion Economica and Social (CIES) in Lima, Peru, an umbrella organization with 26 affiliates in Peru that supports research, dissemination, and training on economic and social issues related to public policies and programs. He is also the chairperson of the Board at REDESS-Jovenes, an organization focused on adolescents’ sexual and reproductive health issues. Aramburú was president of the National Population Council in Peru from 1991-1992 and again in 1996. In addition to working extensively in the policy and program arena, he is the author of numerous articles and books, including a recent coauthored book on adolescent reproductive health and

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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries pregnancy in Peru. He has a B.A. in social anthropology from the Catholic University of Peru, a postgraduate diploma in rural development studies from Cambridge University, and M.Sc. in demography from the London School of Economics and Political Sciences. NAN MARIE ASTONE is an associate professor in the Department of Population and Family Health Sciences at Johns Hopkins University, where her work has concentrated on the sociology of adolescence and the demography of life course transitions. She currently serves on the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Adolescent Health and Development. Her research has concentrated on teenage childbearing in the United States, particularly the relationship between teenage childbearing and family and community background factors and the influence of teenage pregnancy and childbearing on education and work of adolescents. In addition to her work on transitions to adulthood, Astone’s research addresses child health in the United States and abroad. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. KAUSHIK BASU is professor of economics and C. Marks professor of international studies at Cornell University. Prior to his work at Cornell, he was professor of economics at the Delhi School of Economics and has served as a visiting professor at a number of universities, including Princeton University, Stockholm University, the London School of Economics, and Harvard University, and was recently a visiting fellow in the office of senior vice president of development economics at the World Bank. His work focuses on development economics and he has written extensively on a number of topics, including inequality, international debt, and various labor issues including child labor. In addition to his academic activities, he publishes a monthly column in India Today on economic issues and has had articles and book reviews in several other leading English newspapers and magazines. He has a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics. JERE R. BEHRMAN is the William R. Kenan, Jr. professor of economics at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has been on the faculty since 1965. His research interests include empirical micro economics, economic development, labor economics, human resources, economic demography, and household behaviors. He has worked as a research consultant with numerous national and international organizations, including the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the Inter-American Development Bank. He has been the principal investigator or co-principal investigator on numerous research projects, has lectured widely in the United States and abroad, and has been involved in professional research or lecturing activities in over 40 countries in Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America and the

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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries Caribbean. He has received various honors, including being selected as a Fulbright 40th anniversary distinguished fellow, a fellow of the Econometric Society, a Guggenheim Foundation faculty fellow, and a Ford Foundation faculty fellow. He has a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ROBERT W. BLUM is professor and chair of the Department of Population and Family Health Sciences in the Bloomberg School of Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include adolescent sexuality, chronic illness, and international adolescent health care issues. He was also co-investigator for the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health, the largest survey of American youth ever undertaken. He is a past president of the Society for Adolescent Medicine; has served on the American Board of Pediatrics; was a charter member of the sub-Board of Adolescent Medicine; and is a past chair of The Alan Guttmacher Institute board of directors. Currently, he chairs the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Adolescent Health and Development. He is a consultant to the World Bank and UNICEF as well as the World Health Organization. He has been awarded the Society for Adolescent Medicine’s outstanding achievement award and the American Public Health Association’s Herbert Needleman award. He has an M.D. from Howard University College of Medicine, an M.P.H. in maternal and child health and a Ph.D. in hospital and health care administration from the University of Minnesota. BARNEY COHEN (Study Director) is director of the National Academies’ Committee on Population and assumed the role of study director in September 2003. Since 1992 he has worked at the National Academies on a wide variety of projects, including studies on urbanization, mortality, adolescent fertility and reproductive health, forced migration, aging, the demography of sub-Saharan Africa, HIV/AIDS, the demography of American Indians and Alaska Natives, and racial and ethnic differences in health in later life. Currently, he is working on developing learning partnerships with African Science Academies. He has an M.A. in economics from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in demography from the University of California, Berkeley. VALERIE DURRANT (Study Director) directed for the panel through August 2003. Her research has examined the status of adolescents in Pakistan and household decision making about the activities of children and youth in developing countries. While at the National Academies, Durrant also worked on projects related to leveraging longitudinal data in developing countries and the economic benefits of investing in youth in developing

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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries countries. Prior to joining the Committee on Population, she was a Berelson postdoctoral fellow at the Population Council, where she conducted research on adolescents and on the influence of the status of women on infant and child mortality and children’s schooling in Pakistan. Durrant has an M.S. in sociology from Utah State University and a Ph.D. in sociology with an emphasis in demography from the University of Maryland. She is currently a scientific review administrator with the health of the population integrated review group at the Center for Scientific Review at the National Institutes of Health. ANASTASIA J. GAGE is an associate professor in the Department of International Health and Development at Tulane University. Her research spans a number of topics related to maternal, child, and adolescent health in developing countries. Her previous positions include serving as technical officer with the Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival II Project, senior technical advisor at the U.S. Agency for International Development, and assistant professor of sociology at the Pennsylvania State University. She has written articles on adolescent decision making about sexual activity and contraceptive use, premarital childbearing and maternity care in sub-Saharan Africa, and children’s schooling and gender in the transition to adulthood. She has a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. SHIREEN J. JEJEEBHOY is senior program associate, Population Council, New Delhi, India. Prior to joining the Population Council, she was a scientist working on social science research on reproductive health at the World Health Organization where she oversaw a large project on adolescent reproductive health. Previously, she worked as an independent consultant. Her areas of expertise include women’s status, education, fertility, and reproductive health in Southern Asia. She was the country coordinator for the India Status of Women and Fertility Survey and has published articles on the reproductive and sexual health of adolescents in India. She has a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. RICHARD JESSOR is a professor of social and developmental psychology and director of the Research Program on Health Behavior in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado. He has been writing in the area of adolescence in the United States for several decades, notably on adolescent risk behaviors. He is a former member of the Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy and has served on two panels at the National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, one on high-risk youth and one on adolescent pregnancy and childbearing. Jessor also works on related issues in developing countries. He has a current research project looking at adolescent risk behaviors in Beijing and

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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries Zhengzhou, China. He is a consultant to a number of international organizations, including the World Health Organization and UNICEF, on adolescents and adolescent health. He has an M.A. from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University BARTHÉLÉMY KUATE-DEFO is an associate professor of demography and preventive medicine at the University of Montreal. His research interests include fertility and mortality linkages, sexuality and reproductive health, child nutrition, African demography, and event history and multilevel methods. He is currently the principal investigator on a large Rockefeller Foundation project examining the determinants and consequences of adolescent sexuality and reproductive health in Cameroon. The first phase of the project culminated in the publication of a book on sexuality and reproductive health during adolescence in Africa, with special reference to Cameroon. He has a doctoral degree in demography from the Institut de Demographie de Paris and a Ph.D. in population studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He also has M.S. degrees in epidemiology and demography. DAVID A. LAM is a professor of economics and formerly director of the Population Studies Center at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He was also a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Population. His research focuses on the interaction of economics and demography in developing countries. He has worked extensively in Brazil and South Africa, analyzing the links between education, labor markets, and income inequality. He has served as a Fulbright visiting researcher at the Institute for Applied Economic Research in Rio de Janeiro and as a Fulbright visiting professor at the University of Cape Town. He has recently engaged in research on returns to school quality in Brazil, consequences of economic shocks on children’s schooling, and child labor in Brazil. He has an M.A. in Latin American studies from the University of Texas, Austin, and an M.A. in demography and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley. ROBERT J. MAGNANI is vice president for technical support at the Family Health International (FHI) Institute for HIV/AIDS. Prior to joining FHI, he was professor and chair in the Department of International Health and Development at Tulane University’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. Magnani has over 20 years of experience in the international population, health, and nutrition sectors, with extensive program and consulting experience with a number of agencies. He has worked in over 20 developing countries in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and the Pacific. He led the research and evaluation efforts of the FOCUS on Young Adults Program. He has written numerous publications concerning the reproductive

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Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries health of adolescents and evaluating reproductive health and family planning and health programs aimed at adolescents and others, including both substantive and methodological studies. He has an M.A. in sociology from the State University of New York at Albany and a Ph.D. in demography from Brown University. BARBARA S. MENSCH is a senior associate in the Policy Research Division of the Population Council. Mensch has been involved in research on adolescents and the transition to adulthood in Egypt, Ghana, India, Kenya, and Vietnam, as well as the United States. She coauthored (with Judith Bruce and Margaret Greene) The Uncharted Passage: Girls’ Adolescence in the Developing World, a seminal report on adolescents in developing countries. Her work on adolescents spans a number of life course events and dimensions of adolescents’ lives including education, reproductive health, gender-role socialization, marriage, and livelihoods. She has an M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Princeton University and an M.A. in social and political sciences from Cambridge University. SUSHEELA SINGH is vice president for research at The Alan Guttmacher Institute. Singh has been an active researcher in the area of adolescent reproductive health for almost 20 years, conducting research on marriage, sexual activity, contraceptive use, and childbearing in the United States, other developed countries, and developing countries. The majority of her recent work involves comparative studies of adolescents across developing countries and regions. She is the author of journal articles and publications on a variety of topics related to adolescent sexual activity and reproductive health. Her recent publications include articles on gender differences in the timing of first intercourse in 14 countries and sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents in developed countries. She has also been involved in research on age at marriage in developing countries. She has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. NELLY P. STROMQUIST is a professor at the University of Southern California’s Rossier School of Education and an affiliated faculty member of its Center for Feminist Research and Gender Studies. Previously she held research positions at the International Development Research Center in Canada and as a visiting professor at Stanford University; the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil; Florida State University; and the University of California, Los Angeles. She has written extensively on issues of education and gender in developing countries, including books on promoting education for girls and women in Latin America, the politics of educational innovation in developing countries, and gender and grassroots dynamics in Brazil. She has a Ph.D. in education from Stanford University.