APPENDIX A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Larry D. Welch (Chair) (U.S. Air Force, retired) is senior fellow and immediate past president of the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). Prior to joining IDA, he was the 12th chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, from 1986 to 1990. As chief, he served as the senior uniformed Air Force officer responsible for the organization, training, and equipage of a combined active duty, Guard, Reserve, and civilian force serving at locations in the United States and overseas. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he served with the other Service chiefs as the principal military advisers to the Secretary of Defense, National Security Council, and the President. General Welch received a B.A. degree in business administration from the University of Maryland and an M.S. degree in international relations from the George Washington University. He also completed the Armed Forces Staff College and National War College. He was recently awarded the Eugene G. Fubini Award for 2003. This award recognizes highly significant contributions to the Department of Defense in an advisory capacity over a sustained period of time and the providing of expert advice on a diverse range of issues including ballistic missile defense, weapons of mass destruction threats, strategic roadmaps, operational plans, and various transformational technologies.


C.D. (Dan) Mote, Jr. (Vice Chair) (NAE) began his tenure as president of the University of Maryland and as Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering in September 1998. Prior to assuming the presidency at the University of Maryland, Dr. Mote served on the University of California, Berkeley, faculty for 31 years. From 1991 to 1998, he was vice chancellor at the University of California, Berkeley, and held an endowed chair in mechanical systems. Prior to this, he served as chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Berkeley.



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APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Larry D. Welch (Chair) (U.S. Air Force, retired) is senior fellow and immediate past president of the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA). Prior to joining IDA, he was the 12th chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, from 1986 to 1990. As chief, he served as the senior uniformed Air Force officer responsible for the organiza- tion, training, and equipage of a combined active duty, Guard, Reserve, and civilian force serving at locations in the United States and overseas. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he served with the other Service chiefs as the principal military advisers to the Secretary of Defense, National Security Council, and the President. General Welch received a B.A. degree in business administration from the University of Maryland and an M.S. degree in international relations from the George Washington University. He also completed the Armed Forces Staff College and National War College. He was recently awarded the Eugene G. Fubini Award for 2003. This award recognizes highly significant contributions to the Department of Defense in an advisory capacity over a sustained period of time and the providing of expert advice on a diverse range of issues including ballistic missile defense, weapons of mass destruction threats, strategic roadmaps, operational plans, and various transformational technologies. C.D. (Dan) Mote, Jr. (Vice Chair) (NAE) began his tenure as president of the University of Maryland and as Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineer- ing in September 1998. Prior to assuming the presidency at the University of Maryland, Dr. Mote served on the University of California, Berkeley, faculty for 31 years. From 1991 to 1998, he was vice chancellor at the University of California, Berkeley, and held an endowed chair in mechanical systems. Prior to this, he served as chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Berkeley. 27

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28 ASSESSMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASIC RESEARCH Dr. Mote’s research lies in dynamic systems and biomechanics. Internationally recognized for his research on the dynamics of gyroscopic systems and bio- mechanics, he has authored more than 300 publications; holds patents in the United States, Norway, Finland, and Sweden; and has mentored more than 50 Ph.D. students. He received all his degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Mote has received numerous awards and honors, including the Humboldt Prize awarded by the Federal Republic of Germany. He is a recipient of the Berkeley Citation and was named Distinguished Engineering Alumnus. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and currently serves on its council. He was elected to honorary membership in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International and is a fellow of the Acoustical Society of America and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He serves on the Technology Council of Maryland and heads its Technology Trans- fer Committee of the Greater Washington Board of Trade. Albert J. Baciocco, Jr. (U.S. Navy, retired) completed his career in the U.S. Navy as a vice admiral in 1987 after 34 years of distinguished service, principally within the nuclear submarine force and directing the Department of the Navy research and technology development enterprise. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy in 1953, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in engineer- ing, he subsequently completed graduate-level studies in nuclear engineering as part of his training for the naval nuclear propulsion program. He served as Chief of Naval Research from 1978 to 1981 and as the director of Research, Develop- ment and Acquisition from 1983 to 1987. Since retirement, Admiral Baciocco has been engaged in a broad range of business and pro bono activities with industry, government, and academe, including memberships on the Naval Studies Board and the Army Science Board and on the boards of directors of several corporations, both public and private. He is a trustee of the South Carolina Research Authority and serves as a director of the Research Foundations of the University of South Carolina and the Medical University of South Carolina. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi, a national engineering honor society, and is a recipient of an honorary doctorate in engineering from Florida Atlantic University. Admiral Baciocco has been designated a lifetime national associate of the National Academies by the Council of the National Academies of Sciences. Jack R. Borsting is professor of business administration and dean emeritus, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California (USC). From 1994 to September 2001, he served as the executive director of the Center for Telecommunications Management (CTM) at USC, as well as the Morgan Stanley Professor of Business Administration. From 1988 to 1994, Dr. Borsting was dean of USC’s School of Business Administration and Robert Dockson Professor of Business Administration. From 1983 to 1988, he was dean of the School of Busi-

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29 APPENDIX A ness Administration at the University of Miami. Previously, Dr. Borsting was Assistant Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) for the U.S. Department of Defense, appointed by Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan. As Comptroller, he acted as chief financial officer for the Secretary of Defense, with overall respon- sibility for the department’s information and budgeting systems, and was a member of the Defense Resources Board. Dr. Borsting has served as provost and academic dean at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and has been the Visiting Distinguished Professor at Oregon State University. He served 2 years with the Air Force as project officer at the Air Force Special Weapons Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Dr. Borsting is past president of the Opera- tions Research Society of America and the Military Operations Research Society (MORS), and he is a fellow of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the International Engineering Consortium, and MORS. He is past chair and a member of the board of directors of the Los Angeles Orthopaedic Hospital and serves on the advisory council of the Electric Power Research Institute. Dr. Borsting is a trustee of the Rose Hills Foundation and MetLife Investors Trust and also serves on a number of corporate boards. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from the University of Oregon and his B.A. degree in math- ematics from Oregon State University. He has published articles on operations research and statistics. John M. Deutch is an Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- nology (MIT). He served as Director of Central Intelligence from May 1995 to December 1996. From 1994 to 1995, he served as Deputy Secretary of Defense and as Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology from 1993 to 1994. Dr. Deutch has also served as Director of Energy Research (1977 to 1979), acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Technology (1979), and Undersecretary (1979 to 1980) in the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, he has served on the President’s Nuclear Safety Oversight Committee (1980 to 1981), the President’s Commission on Strategic Forces (1983), the White House Science Council (1985 to 1989), the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (1990 to 1993), the President’s Commission on Aviation Safety and Security (1996), and the President’s Com- mission on Reducing and Protecting Government Secrecy (1996). He served as a member of the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (1997 to 2001) and as chair of the President’s Commission to Assess the Organi- zation of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (1998 to 1999). Dr. Deutch serves as director for the following publicly held companies: Citicorp, Cummins, Raytheon, and Schlumberger Ltd. He has been a member of the MIT faculty since 1970 and has served as chair of the Department of Chemistry, dean of science, and provost. Dr. Deutch has pub- lished more than 150 technical publications in physical chemistry, as well as numerous publications on technology, international security, and public policy issues.

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30 ASSESSMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASIC RESEARCH Charles B. Duke (NAS/NAE) is vice president and senior research fellow in the Xerox Innovation Group. Prior to holding this position, he was deputy director and chief scientist of the Pacific Northwest Division of the Battelle Memorial Institute and affiliate professor of physics at the University of Washington. From 1972 to 1988 he held various technical and management positions at the Xerox Research Laboratories in Webster, New York, and was an adjunct professor of physics at the University of Rochester. From 1969 to 1972, he was a professor of physics and member of the Materials Research Laboratory and Coordinated Sci- ence Laboratory at the University of Illinois in Urbana, following 6 years as a staff member of the General Electric Corporate Research and Development Center in Schenectady, New York. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University in 1963, following a B.S. degree summa cum laude with distinction in mathematics from Duke University in 1959. He is a fellow and an honorary member of the American Vacuum Society, a fellow of the American Physical Society, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, a member of the Materials Research Society, and a life member of Sigma Xi. In 1977, Dr. Duke received the Medard W. Welch Award in Vacuum Science and Technology. He served as president of the American Vacuum Society in 1979, on its board of directors for 7 years, and as a trustee from 2003 to 2005. In 1981 he was named one of the ISI 1000 internationally most cited scientists. From 1985 to 1986 he served as founding editor in chief of the Journal of Materials Research, and from 1992 to 2001 he was editor in chief of Surface Science and Surface Science Letters. He was on the council of the Materials Research Society for 7 years, serving as treasurer from 1991 to 1992. In 1993 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and in 2001 to the National Academy of Sci- ences. During the period 1995 to 1999 he served on the council and executive board of the American Physical Society. From 1997 to 2000 he served as general chair of the Physical Electronics Conference. He served on the Governing Board of the American Institute of Physics for 11 years and continues to serve on its Corporate Associates Advisory Committee. He has written more than 350 papers on surface science, materials research, semiconductor physics, and the electronic structure of molecular solids. He holds several patents on the use of feedback in the design of digital imaging and printing systems, wrote a monograph on electron tunneling in solids, and has edited three books: Surface Science: The First Thirty Years (1994), Color Systems Integration (1998), and Frontiers in Surface and Interface Science (2002). John S. Foster, Jr. (NAE) is chair of the board of GNK Aerospace Transparency Systems; chair of Technology Strategies and Alliances; a member of the board of Wackenhut Services, Inc., and Diana-Hi-Tech; and consultant to Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, Ninesigma, and Defense Group, Inc. He retired from TRW as vice president for science and technology in 1988 and continued to serve on the board of directors of TRW from 1988 to 1994.

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31 APPENDIX A Dr. Foster was also Director of Defense Research and Engineering for the Department of Defense, serving for 8 years. He began his career at the Radio Research Laboratory of Harvard University. He spent 2 years as an advisor to the 15th Air Force on radar and radar countermeasures in the Mediterranean theater of operations, and the two summers with the National Research Council of Chalk River, Ontario. Dr. Foster became a division leader in experimental physics at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. He was promoted to associate director, and 3 years later was promoted to director of the Livermore Laboratory and asso- ciate director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He received his B.S. degree from McGill University, Montreal, in 1948. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1952. Mary L. Good (NAE) is well known for her distinguished career. She has held many high-level positions in academia, industry, and government. The 143,000- member American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) elected Dr. Good to serve as its president following the presidency of Stephen Jay Gould. Dr. Good was the first female winner of the AAAS’s Philip Hogue Abelson Prize for outstanding achievements in education, research and development manage- ment, and public service, spanning the academic, industrial, and government sectors. Two of her more than 27 awards include the National Science Foundation Distinguished Service medal and the American Chemical Society Priestley Medal. Dr. Good is currently the dean of the Donaghey College of Information Science and Systems Engineering at the University of Arkansas, Little Rock. In addition, she serves as the managing partner of Venture Capital Investors, LLC, in Little Rock. Dr. Good was voted one of Arkansas’s Top 100 Women by Arkansas Busi- ness. During the terms of Presidents Carter and Reagan, Dr. Good served on the National Science Board and chaired it from 1988 to 1991. She was a member of President George H.W. Bush’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. Dr. Good was the Undersecretary for Technology in the U.S. Department of Com- merce and Technology during President Clinton’s first term. This agency assists American industry to advance productivity, technology, and innovation in order to make U.S. companies more competitive in the global market. Robert J. Hermann (NAE) is currently a senior partner of Global Technology Partners, LLC, a Boston-based investment firm, specializing in investments in technology, defense, aerospace, and related businesses worldwide. In 1998, Dr. Hermann retired from United Technologies Corporation (UTC), where he was senior vice president, science and technology. Prior to joining UTC in 1982, Dr. Hermann served 20 years with the National Security Agency, with assign- ments in research and development, operations, and NATO. In 1977, he was appointed Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Communications, Command, Control, and Intelligence. In 1979, he was named Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for research, development, and logistics, and in parallel he was

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32 ASSESSMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASIC RESEARCH director of the National Reconnaissance Office. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Iowa State University. He is currently a member of the following organizations: the Defense Science Board, the National Academy of Engineering, and the board of directors of Orbital Sciences Corpora- tion. His prior organizational memberships include the National Society of Pro- fessional Engineers Industry Advisory Group; chair of the Visiting Committee on Advanced Technology of the National Institute of Standards and Technology; board of trustees for the Hartford Graduate Center; chair, co-chair, National Research Council Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applica- tions; the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board; the Commission on the Roles and Missions of the U.S. Intelligence Activities; chair, board of directors of the American National Standards Institute; chair, board of directors of Draper Laboratory; and board of directors, Condor Systems, Inc. James C. McGroddy (NAE) retired from IBM Corporation as a senior vice president for research at the end of 1996, after leading its research laboratories from 1989 to 1995. During his tenure, which spanned the period of IBM’s most difficult challenges, he led a major restructuring of its research efforts, building a model and management system that is now widely emulated. One of the measures of success was the creation during this period of two new laboratories, one in Beijing and one in Austin, Texas. His leadership was recognized by being awarded the Frederik Philips Medal of the IEEE and the George Pake Award of the American Physical Society. He is currently an advisor to several government agencies, a participant in a number of National Research Council groups, and an advisor and a visitor at several universities in the United States and Europe. Dr. McGroddy is the chair of the board of MIQS, a company providing clinical information systems and electronic medical record capability aimed at improving the quality and cost-effectiveness of the care of the chronically ill. As chair of the board of the Stellaris Healthcare Network in 2000 and 2001 and as former chair of the board of Phelps Memorial Hospital Center, he has been heavily involved in the restructuring of the local health care delivery system in Westchester County. He is a director of Paxar, Inc., a New York Stock Exchange traded company, and of Advanced Networks and Services, Inc. He is also a trustee of his alma mater, St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, as well as a member of the advisory boards of a number of start-up firms and university departments. Dr. McGroddy originally joined IBM in its Research Division in 1965 after receiving a Ph.D. in physics from the University of Maryland. He earned his B.S. in physics from St. Joseph’s University in Philadelphia in 1958. In his first years at IBM he focused on research in solid-state physics and electronic devices, and as a result of achievements in these areas was named a fellow of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Physical Society. In the 1970-1971 academic year, he was a visiting professor of physics at the Danish Tech- nical University. Returning to IBM, he served in a number of management positions

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33 APPENDIX A in research, development, and manufacturing before being named IBM’s director of research in 1989. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. C. Bradley Moore (NAE) is a dynamic leader and internationally recognized chemist. He went to Northwestern University in 2003 from the Ohio State University where, as vice president for research and president of the Ohio State University Research Foundation, he spearheaded dramatic increases in research growth. Improvements in the university’s research support services and promo- tion of multidisciplinary programs across the campus were vital hallmarks of Dr. Moore’s tenure at Ohio State. While promoting growth and innovation as vice president for research, he was also a Distinguished Professor of Mathematical and Physical Sciences and a professor of chemistry at Ohio State, where he directed an active research program on molecular energy transfer, chemical reaction dynamics, photochemistry, and spectroscopy. A member of the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, from 1963 to 2000, Dr. Moore also served as chair of the Chemistry Department and dean of the College of Chemistry. In addition, he was a faculty senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from 1974 to 2000, serving as director of its Chemical Sciences Division from 1998 to 2000. Dr. Moore received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Harvard University in 1960 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1963. James G. O’Connor (NAE) is the former president of Pratt & Whitney. His 34- year career there started in engineering and included key assignments in customer support, program management, manufacturing operations, and general manage- ment. He was involved in both military and commercial programs and businesses. His engineering assignments included development and certification of key com- mercial engines for the Boeing and Douglas aircraft companies. In early 1981, Dr. O’Connor was named vice president of Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engine Business in East Hartford, Connecticut, responsible for all product support. In 1982, he joined Pratt & Whitney’s Government Engine Business in West Palm Beach, Florida, as senior vice president for the F100 engine program. He was appointed executive vice president of the Government Engine Business in Janu- ary 1984 and assumed the post of president in March 1985. In this position he was responsible for all aspects of Pratt’s $2 billion business with the U.S. government and 15 foreign governments. In October 1987, Dr. O’Connor returned to East Hartford and was named vice president of manufacturing operations. In 1989 he became the chief executive for Pratt & Whitney. He was responsible for all of the aircraft engine manufacturer’s $7 billion operations. He retired in 1993. He is currently chair of the board of trustees of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In addition, he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Con- necticut Academy of Science and Engineering, the President’s Advisory Council at Clemson University, and the Wings Club.

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34 ASSESSMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASIC RESEARCH Richard C. Powell is currently vice president for research and graduate studies and professor at the Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona. He received his B.S. in physics in 1962 from the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland; his Ph.D. and M.S. in physics in 1964 and 1967 from Arizona State University, Tempe. From 1964 to 1968, Dr. Powell was a staff scientist at the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories in Bedford, Massachusetts, where he worked on the development of new solid-state laser materials and radiation damage in semiconductor devices. Between 1968 and 1971, Dr. Powell was a staff scientist at the Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where his research involved exciton dynamics in organic crystals and polymers and satura- tion effects in plastic scintillators. In 1971, Dr. Powell moved to Oklahoma State University in Stillwater, where he was a professor in the Physics Department and director of the Center for Laser Research until 1992. He also served as head of the Physics Department and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. During that period, his research involved laser spectroscopy of solids for use in lasers and nonlinear optics applications. In addition, he participated in several projects involving laser applications in medicine. Dr. Powell also had several temporary assignments, including positions at Motorola Semiconductor Division, the California Institute of Technology, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During his scientific career, he has published more than 200 articles, two books, and participated in many national and international conferences. Fawwaz T. Ulaby (NAE) is the vice president for research and the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He is a member of the National Academy of Engi- neering and serves on several national scientific boards and commissions. Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, Professor Ulaby has been directing large, interdisciplinary National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) projects aimed at the development of high-resolution satellite radar sensors for mapping Earth’s terrestrial environment. He also served as the found- ing director of the NASA-funded Center for Space Terahertz Technology. The center’s research focuses on the development of microelectronic devices and circuits that operate at wavelengths intermediate between the infrared and the microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Professor Ulaby has authored eight books, contributed chapters to several others, and published more than 600 scientific papers and reports. His recent undergraduate textbook, Applied Electro- magnetics, published by Prentice-Hall in January 1997, has been adopted by some 80 universities across the United States. Professor Ulaby is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Eta Kappa Nu Association C. Holmes MacDonald Award as “an Outstanding Electrical Engineering Professor in the United States of America for 1975,” the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Centennial Medal (1984), the American Society of Photogrammetry’s Presiden- tial Citation for Meritorious Service (1984), the Kuwait Prize in applied science

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35 APPENDIX A (1986), the NASA Group Achievement Award (1990), the University of Michigan’s Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award (1991), the University of Michigan Regents Medal for Meritorious Service (1996), the IEEE Millennium Medal for Outstanding Achievements and Contributions (2000), and the 2001 IEEE Electromagnetics Award. Over his 30-year academic career, Professor Ulaby has supervised more than 100 M.S. and Ph.D. graduate students and served as principal investigator on about $40 million in research grants and contracts. In January 2001 he assumed the position of editor in chief of the IEEE Proceedings, the most highly cited journal in electrical and computer engineering. In 2002 he received the William Pecora Award, a joint recognition by NASA and the Depart- ment of the Interior. Barbara A. Wilson is currently a program manager in the Solar System Explora- tion Programs Directorate at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), where she manages the development of communications, computing, electronics, and imaging technologies for NASA’s Office of Exploration Systems. From 2001 to 2003, she served as the chief technologist of the Air Force Research Laboratory under an Intergovernmental Personnel Act loan agreement between NASA and the Air Force, and as JPL’s chief technologist from 1999 to 2001. After earning her Ph.D. in physics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1978, she worked in basic research at AT&T Bell Laboratories, with a focus on quantum structures. Her research contributions were recognized with an AT&T Excep- tional Contribution Award. She moved to JPL in 1988, where she has also served as director of the Center for Space Microelectronics, as manager of the Microdevices Laboratory, and as deputy manager and chief technologist of NASA’s New Millennium flight validation program. Her leadership in the New Millennium Program earned her both JPL and NASA achievement awards. Dr. Wilson is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and former general councilor and member of the APS Executive Board. She was appointed to the International Academy of Astronautics in 2000. She is currently serving her second term on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). As an SAB member, she has partici- pated in a number of U.S. Air Force studies and was appointed science and tech- nology chair of the SAB in 2004. In this capacity she will lead the external review of the Air Force science and technology programs. Dr. Wilson has also served on numerous other National Science Foundation, National Research Council, and NASA panels. Johnnie E. Wilson (U.S. Army, retired) is the president and chief operating officer of Dimensions International, Inc. (DI), an information technology com- pany specializing in information integration and providing solutions for the acquisition, analysis, management, and transformation of data into information. His primary responsibility is on the program side, providing oversight to the tech- nical directors and program managers. He assists them in managing, marketing,

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36 ASSESSMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BASIC RESEARCH and expanding their operations. His extensive network, both military and civilian, is a great asset in maturing opportunities that will enhance DI’s growth and devel- opment. General Wilson entered the Army in August 1961 as an enlisted soldier, attaining the rank of SSG before attending Officer Candidate School (OCS). On completion of OCS in 1967, he was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Ordnance Corps. He was awarded a B.S. degree in business administration from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. General Wilson also holds an M.S. degree in logistics management from the Florida Institute of Technology. Additionally, his military education includes completion of the Ordnance Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, the Army Command and General Staff College, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. General Wilson has held a wide variety of important command and staff positions, culminating in his last assignment as the Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command (AMC), an organiza- tion of 80,000 people serving throughout the world. As the commanding general of AMC, he was responsible for the Army’s wholesale logistics, acquisition, and technology generation operations. As a result, General Wilson possesses exten- sive knowledge in supply-chain management, acquisition reform, and strategic logistics planning. General Wilson also served as the deputy commanding general, 21st Theater Army Area Command (TAACOM), the Army’s largest and most diverse logistics unit. Based on his wide experience with leading soldiers, General Wilson was selected to command the Ordnance Center and School responsible for the training and professional development of thousands of soldiers, non- commissioned officers, and officers every year. Following this successful assign- ment, he served as the chief of staff, AMC, where he was responsible for resource and personnel management for a workforce with more than 80,000 military and civilian members. From 1994 to 1996, General Wilson served as the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Department of the Army, where he was responsible for worldwide logistics.