References

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1993). Project 2061 benchmarks for science literacy. New York: Oxford University Press.


Clements, D., and Conference Working Group. (2004). Part one: Major themes and recommendations. In D.H. Clements, J. Sarama, and A.-M. DiBiase (Eds.), Engaging young children in mathematics education (pp. 1-72). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Coley, R. (2002). An uneven start: Indicators of inequality in school readiness. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service.

Committee for Economic Development. (2002). Preschool for all: Investing in a productive and just society. Washington, DC: Author.


French, L. (2004). Science as the center of a coherent, integrated, early childhood curriculum. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 138-149.


Gelman, R., and Brenneman, K. (2004). Science learning pathways for young children. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 150-158.

Ginsburg, H.P., and Golbeck, S.L. (2004). Thoughts on the future of research on mathematics and science learning and education. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 190-200.


Haith, M. M., and Benson, J.B. (1998). Infant cognition. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) and D. Kuhn and R. Siegler (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 2, Cognition, language and perception (5th ed.). New York: Wiley.


Jordan, N.C., Huttenlocher, J., and Levine, S.C. (1992). Differential calculation abilities in young children from middle- and low-income families. Developmental Psychology, 28, 644-653.


Kuhn, D. (2000). Developmental origins of scientific thinking. Journal of Cognition and Development, 1, 113-129.


Lee, V., and Burkham, D. (2002). Inequality at the starting gate: Social background differences in achievement as children begin school. Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute.


Magnuson, K.A., Meyers, M.K., Ruhm, C.J., and Waldfogel, J. (Spring 2004). Inequality in preschool education and school readiness. American Educational Research Journal, 41(1), 115-157.



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Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary References American Association for the Advancement of Science. (1993). Project 2061 benchmarks for science literacy. New York: Oxford University Press. Clements, D., and Conference Working Group. (2004). Part one: Major themes and recommendations. In D.H. Clements, J. Sarama, and A.-M. DiBiase (Eds.), Engaging young children in mathematics education (pp. 1-72). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Coley, R. (2002). An uneven start: Indicators of inequality in school readiness. Princeton, NJ: Educational Testing Service. Committee for Economic Development. (2002). Preschool for all: Investing in a productive and just society. Washington, DC: Author. French, L. (2004). Science as the center of a coherent, integrated, early childhood curriculum. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 138-149. Gelman, R., and Brenneman, K. (2004). Science learning pathways for young children. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 150-158. Ginsburg, H.P., and Golbeck, S.L. (2004). Thoughts on the future of research on mathematics and science learning and education. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 190-200. Haith, M. M., and Benson, J.B. (1998). Infant cognition. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) and D. Kuhn and R. Siegler (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 2, Cognition, language and perception (5th ed.). New York: Wiley. Jordan, N.C., Huttenlocher, J., and Levine, S.C. (1992). Differential calculation abilities in young children from middle- and low-income families. Developmental Psychology, 28, 644-653. Kuhn, D. (2000). Developmental origins of scientific thinking. Journal of Cognition and Development, 1, 113-129. Lee, V., and Burkham, D. (2002). Inequality at the starting gate: Social background differences in achievement as children begin school. Washington, DC: Economic Policy Institute. Magnuson, K.A., Meyers, M.K., Ruhm, C.J., and Waldfogel, J. (Spring 2004). Inequality in preschool education and school readiness. American Educational Research Journal, 41(1), 115-157.

OCR for page 35
Mathematical and Scientific Development in Early Childhood: A Workshop Summary National Research Council. (1996). National science education standards. National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment. Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council. (1998). Preventing reading difficulties in young children. C.E. Snow, M.S. Burns, and P. Griffin (Eds.). Committee on the Prevention of Reading Difficulties in Young Children. Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council. (2001a). Adding it up: Helping children learn mathematics. Mathematics Learning Study Committee, J. Kilpatrick, J. Swafford, and B. Findell (Eds.). Center for Education, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council (2001b). Eager to learn: Educating our preschoolers. Committee on Early Childhood Pedagogy. B.T. Bowman, M.S. Donovan, and M.S. Burns (Eds.). Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, J.P. Shonkoff and D.A. Phillips (Eds.). Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Newcombe, N. (2002). The nativist-empiricist controversy in the context of recent research on spatial and quantitative development. Psychological Science, 13(5), 395-401. Starkey, P. and Klein, A. (1992). Economic and cultural influence on early mathematical development. In F.L. Parker, R. Robinson, S. Sombrano, C. Piotrowski, J.Hagen, S. Randolph, and A. Baker (Eds.), New directions in child and family research: Shaping Head Start in the 90’s (pp. 4-40). New York: National Council of Jewish Women. Starkey, P., Klein, A., and Wakeley, A. (2004). Enhancing young children’s mathematical knowledge through a pre-kindergarten mathematics intervention. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 19(1), 99-120. U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2004). The condition of education 2004. (NCES–077). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Wellman, H. and Gelman, S. (1998). Knowledge acquisition in foundational domains. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) and D. Kuhn and R. Siegler (Vol. Eds.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 2, Cognition, language and perception (5th ed., pp. 523-574). New York: Wiley.