Appendix D
Committee and Staff Biographical Information

DAVID E. LONGNECKER, M.D., Chair, is Professor of Anesthesia at the University of Pennsylvania. He has received numerous NIH research grants and a Research Career Development Award for research involving the effects of anesthetics on the microcirculation, oxygen delivery to tissue, oxygen therapeutics, endothelium-dependent circulatory control, and health services research. Dr. Longnecker is a member of IOM and Chair of the IOM’s Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments.

JAMES P. BAGIAN, M.D., P.E., is Director, Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety. From 1980 to 1995, Dr. Bagian served as a NASA astronaut. He is a veteran of two Shuttle missions, including the first dedicated Space and Life Sciences Spacelab mission. He was also a lead investigator for both the Challenger and Columbia accidents. Dr. Bagian focuses on applications in aerospace systems, notably crew survival and physiological adaptation issues that affect aviation and space flight operations, as well as environmental technology. He has also developed and implemented, on a national and international basis, systems-based solutions to improve patient safety. Dr. Bagian is a member of IOM and NAE and has served on or chaired numerous committees of the National Academies.



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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report Appendix D Committee and Staff Biographical Information DAVID E. LONGNECKER, M.D., Chair, is Professor of Anesthesia at the University of Pennsylvania. He has received numerous NIH research grants and a Research Career Development Award for research involving the effects of anesthetics on the microcirculation, oxygen delivery to tissue, oxygen therapeutics, endothelium-dependent circulatory control, and health services research. Dr. Longnecker is a member of IOM and Chair of the IOM’s Committee on Aerospace Medicine and the Medicine of Extreme Environments. JAMES P. BAGIAN, M.D., P.E., is Director, Department of Veterans Affairs National Center for Patient Safety. From 1980 to 1995, Dr. Bagian served as a NASA astronaut. He is a veteran of two Shuttle missions, including the first dedicated Space and Life Sciences Spacelab mission. He was also a lead investigator for both the Challenger and Columbia accidents. Dr. Bagian focuses on applications in aerospace systems, notably crew survival and physiological adaptation issues that affect aviation and space flight operations, as well as environmental technology. He has also developed and implemented, on a national and international basis, systems-based solutions to improve patient safety. Dr. Bagian is a member of IOM and NAE and has served on or chaired numerous committees of the National Academies.

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report ELIZABETH CANTWELL, Ph.D., is Section Leader in the Micro and Nanotechnology Center of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Dr. Cantwell works with issues involving technology transfer, strategic planning for new programs, technology assessment for microtechnology and biotechnology, the development of new applications and clients, environmental monitoring and sensors, and drinking water security. Previously, Dr. Cantwell was a program manager in the Life Sciences Division at NASA Headquarters. Her main responsibility at NASA was the Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control Program. Dr. Cantwell was a member of the previous NRC Committee on Human Support in Space. VALERIE GAWRON, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist, Human Factors, Flight and Aerospace Research Group, Veridian Corporation, Buffalo, New York. Dr. Gawron is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, with previous NRC service. Currently, her research focuses on the cognitive and environmental effects of human performance, with a specialization in situational awareness, testing, and evaluation. She is also currently the Chair of the Science and Technology Working Group of NASA’s Space-Human Factors Engineering Group. CHRISTOPHER HART, J.D., M.S., is Assistant Administrator for System Safety, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Mr. Hart holds a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in aerospace and mechanical science from Princeton University, as well as a law degree from Harvard University. He holds a commercial pilot’s license with multi-engine and instrument ratings. He has served as a member of the National Transportation Safety Board (1990–1993), where he had specialized interests in human factors and the impact of automation on transportation systems. CHARLES LAND, Ph.D., is a Senior Investigator with the National Cancer Institute, specializing in studies of cancer risk in populations exposed to ionizing radiation from medical, occupational, and environmental sources, including the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and populations exposed to radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons testing in Kazakhstan. A related area of interest is accounting for subjective and statistical uncertainty in the expression of information on risk. Dr. Land is a member of the National Council on Radiological Protection and Measurements, and of Committee 1, on Risk, of the Interna-

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report tional Commission on Radiological Protection. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. THOMAS TEN HAVE, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, and Senior Fellow, Institute on Aging, at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Ten Have’s methodological interests focus on effectiveness research in the context of multisite randomized and observational studies in psychiatry, geriatrics, family medicine, addiction research, and disparities research. In particular, he has received funding to develop new methods for adjusting for patient and physician noncompliance in randomized trials, group-randomized trials, and confounding due to clinics, centers, or practices. Dr. Ten Have is associate editor of Biometrics and Statistics in Medicine. DANIEL R. MASYS, M.D., is Director of Biomedical Informatics and Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. He was Chief of the International Cancer Research Data Bank of the National Cancer Institute, NIH, and from 1986 through 1994 was Director of the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications. Dr. Masys is a diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine in Medicine, Hematology, and Medical Oncology. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, and member of IOM. He has served as a consultant to the NASA Life Science Informatics program and is an active instrument-rated pilot. BRUCE MCCANDLESS II, M.S., is an aerospace engineer and Research Scientist in Advance Space Transportation Systems at Lockheed Martin. He is a former NASA astronaut. Mr. McCandless has directed numerous space technology risk assessment efforts including the first phase of the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter nuclear-fission powered space craft studies, analysis of acoustical properties of the International Space Center, Bride-to-Space and other tether technology programs, and fuel and power-related studies for space travel. TOM S. NEUMAN, M.D., is Professor of Medicine and Surgery and Associate Director, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Diego, San Diego Medical Center. Dr. Neuman is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary disease, occupational medicine,

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report undersea and hyperbaric medicine, and emergency medicine. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Neuman has been a leader in the field of the physiology and medicine of diving throughout his career and was the editor-in-chief of Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine until July 2002. He is the co-editor of the most widely used textbook of diving medicine and physiology. He previously served on the IOM Committee on Space Medicine. THOMAS F. OLTMANNS, Ph.D., is Edgar James Swift Professor of Arts and Sciences in the Department of Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He previously served as a Professor of Psychology and Psychiatric Medicine and Director of Clinical Training in Psychology at the University of Virginia and as a Professor of Psychology at Indiana University. Dr. Oltmanns is past president of the Society for a Science of Clinical Psychology and is a consulting editor for the Journal of Abnormal Psychology and member of the editorial board for Psychological Bulletin and the Journal of Personality Disorders. His research has included peer assessment of personality traits and pathology. He has served on two different grant review committees for the National Institute of Mental Health and is a member of NASA’s Astronaut Selection Psychiatric Standards Working Group. LAWRENCE A. PALINKAS, Ph.D., is Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Palinkas serves as the Deputy Chief Officer of the Life Sciences Standing Scientific Committee of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research. He has more than 15 years of experience in studying behavioral adaptation in the Antarctic. He also has been active in translating Antarctic research for use in developing effective countermeasures to long-duration missions in space. Dr. Palinkas served as a member of the NAS Committee on Space Biology and Medicine from 1997 to 2000. He currently serves as Chair of the External Advisory Council of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute and as a member of the Behavior and Performance Integrated Product Team at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. JAMES PAWELCZYK, Ph.D., is a physiologist at the Noll Physiological Research Center of Pennsylvania State University. He was Payload Specialist on STS-90 (Neurolab) and flew in 1998 with a focus on neuroscience. Dr. Pawelczyk has been a member of the NASA Life Sciences Advisory Subcommittee, Office of Biological and Physical Research since 1998, and

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report was a member of the ReMaP Task Force in 2002, which was charged with reprioritizing research on the Space Station. He has held various NASA funding as an individual principal investigator and as a project leader on center grants and for contracts (including those involving international collaboration) since 1993. Dr. Pawelczyk’s research areas include central neural control of the cardiovascular system and compensatory mechanisms to conditioning and deconditioning. BRUCE S. RABIN, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Pathology and Psychology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and Director of the Clinical Immunopathology Laboratory. A main focus of his interest is in the interrelationship among stress, immune function, and health. Dr. Rabin is Past President of the Psycho-neuro-immunology Research Society. He has served on a number of government panels to promote research in mind-body interactions. Dr. Rabin’s research includes interdisciplinary investigations into the effects of stress on human body systems, including several disciplines germane to this study, such as immunology and human behavior changes. KARLENE ROBERTS, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Haas School of Business of the University of California, Berkeley, and a research psychologist at Berkeley’s Institute of Industrial Relations. Dr. Roberts has expertise in the design and management of organizations and systems of organizations for which errors can have catastrophic consequences. The results of her research have been applied to the medical industry and to programs in numerous organizations including the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard, the FAA’s Air Traffic Control System, and NASA. Dr. Roberts is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society. CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Surgery at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City. From 1995 to 2004, she was Professor and Head of Surgery at the same institution. Dr. Scott-Conner has been active on 22 editorial boards and has authored more than 200 original papers, abstracts, reviews, and book chapters. She holds memberships in many elected surgical societies and has frequently served in leadership positions. She previously served as a member of the IOM Committee on Space Medicine. MARGARET RHEA SEDDON, M.D., is Assistant Chief Medical Officer, Vanderbilt Medical Group, Nashville, Tennessee, and a former three-

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report flight veteran astronaut for NASA. As an astronaut, she logged more than 722 hours in space. She was a mission specialist on STS-51D and STS-40 and was Payload Commander on STS-58. Dr. Seddon also served in several other capacities at NASA, namely as technical assistant to the Director of Flight Crew Operations, as special adviser for Shuttle/Mir scientific payloads, and as a member of NASA’s Aerospace Medical Advisory Committee and the International Bioethics Task Force. Dr. Seddon’s areas of interest are emergency medicine and nutrition. JAY R. SHAPIRO, M.D., is the Director, Interdepartmental Center for Space Medicine, Uniformed Services University and Director of the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Program at the Kennedy-Krieger Institute. Dr. Shapiro has many years of direct experience with NASA research and clinical countermeasures related to bone and muscle loss in a microgravity environment. As such, he has a critical historical perspective on NASA risk management of bone loss and expertise in a wide range of clinical countermeasures, including exercise and in-flight drug trials. STAFF ANDREW M. POPE, Ph.D., is Director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope’s previous research activities focused on the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the enhancement of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed studies on priority-setting processes at the National Institutes of Health, fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties, and organ procurement and transplantation. LISA M. VANDEMARK, Ph.D., has a Ph.D. in Geography from Rutgers University and an M.S. in Human Ecology from the University of Brussels, Belgium. She is a registered nurse with a B.S. from Rutgers University.

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report Since 2000 Dr. Vandemark has been a Program Officer at the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, and in 2003 she served as a consultant to NOAA on geospatial capacity-building in Africa. Prior to joining the NRC, she was a research associate at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University; a policy intern at the National Science Resources Center at the Smithsonian Institution; and a psychiatric nurse at McLean Hospital and the Quincy (Massachusetts) Mental Health Center. Her research interests include environmental perception and decision making, international development, natural resource management, and interdisciplinary approaches to policy analysis. MELVIN H. WORTH, JR., M.D., is a Scholar-in-Residence at the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Worth completed his surgery residency at New York University–Bellevue in 1961 and remained on that faculty for 18 years. He founded the Bellevue Trauma Service in 1966 and continued as Director until 1979, when he left to become director of surgery at Staten Island University Hospital. He served for 15 years with the New York State Office of Professional Medical Conduct and 8 years as a member of the New York State Hospital Review and Planning Council (for which he was chair in 1993). He is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons, American College of Gastroenterology, and International Society for Surgery and holds memberships in the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, Society for Critical Care Medicine, Association for Academic Surgery, New York Surgical Society (of which he was president in 1979), and other academic and professional organizations. Dr. Worth retains his appointment at New York University and is Clinical Professor of Surgery at the State University of New York Downstate (Brooklyn) and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. Dr. Worth most recently served as an IOM study staff member to the Committee on Fluid Resuscitation for Combat Casualties and is the senior adviser to the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine During Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. BENJAMIN N. HAMLIN, B.A., Research Associate at the Institute of Medicine, received his bachelor’s degree in biology from the College of Wooster in 1993 and a degree in health sciences from the University of Akron in 1996. He then worked as a surgeon’s assistant in the fields of vascular, thoracic, and general surgery for several years before joining the National Academies staff in 2000. As a Research Assistant for the Division on Earth and Life Studies at the National Academies, he worked with the

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Preliminary Considerations Regarding NASA’s Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap: Interim Report Board on Radiation Effects Research on projects studying the health effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations on the human body. He has worked on a number of Institute of Medicine studies, including Testosterone and Aging: Clinical Research Directions; Review of NASA’s Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health; Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion; Improving Medical Education: Enhancing the Behavioral and Social Science Content in Medical School Curricula; and NIH Extramural Center Programs: Criteria for Initiation and Evaluation. Mr. Hamlin is currently pursuing graduate work in the sociomedical sciences. He is also involved with the U.S.–Bangladesh Advisory Council, an organization that promotes governmental cooperation between the United States and Bangladesh on matters of trade and health care. ERIN MCCARVILLE, B.A., is Senior Project Assistant at the Institute of Medicine. She received her bachelor’s degree in biology and public policy from Pomona College in Los Angeles, California. Before working at the Academies, Ms. McCarville conducted research on rural environmental health for the Center for Community Action and Environmental Justice in Los Angeles. She also worked as a teaching and research assistant for Pomona College’s animal physiology department, as a plant biology researcher for the Chicago Botanic Gardens, and as an intern for Senator Barbara Boxer. She began at the National Academies in 2003 as a Project Assistant for the Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy.

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