Appendix A
Biographic Information on the Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion

RICHARD B. JOHNSTON, JR. (Chair) is associate dean for research development and professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and executive vice president for academic affairs at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center. His research interests include mechanisms of resistance to infection, the cell biology of neutrophils and macrophages, immune deficiency diseases, and child health. He has published more than 250 papers on these topics. Dr. Johnston has served as chair of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, medical director of the March of Dimes, chief of pediatric immunology at Yale, member of the advisory committee for the National Center for Environmental Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and president of three academic pediatric societies. He has previously chaired five Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees and has served on numerous other IOM committees and on the Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He was elected to IOM in 1995 and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his MD from Vanderbilt University.


STACY BRANCH is a consultant and owner of Djehuty Biomed Consulting and an adjunct associate professor with the Department of Animal Science in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Science at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University. She was previously an associate professor of toxicology at North Carolina State University. Her research interests include molecular and classical teratology approaches to



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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion RICHARD B. JOHNSTON, JR. (Chair) is associate dean for research development and professor in the department of pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and executive vice president for academic affairs at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center. His research interests include mechanisms of resistance to infection, the cell biology of neutrophils and macrophages, immune deficiency diseases, and child health. He has published more than 250 papers on these topics. Dr. Johnston has served as chair of pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, medical director of the March of Dimes, chief of pediatric immunology at Yale, member of the advisory committee for the National Center for Environmental Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and president of three academic pediatric societies. He has previously chaired five Institute of Medicine (IOM) committees and has served on numerous other IOM committees and on the Board of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He was elected to IOM in 1995 and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received his MD from Vanderbilt University. STACY BRANCH is a consultant and owner of Djehuty Biomed Consulting and an adjunct associate professor with the Department of Animal Science in the School of Agriculture and Environmental Science at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University. She was previously an associate professor of toxicology at North Carolina State University. Her research interests include molecular and classical teratology approaches to

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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion elucidate the mechanisms of xenobiotically induced abnormal mammalian development, including reproductive system development, and the nature of molecular pathways leading to abnormal phenotypes. Dr. Branch has published articles and book chapters on those subjects and forensic and clinical toxicology. She is managing editor of Frontiers in Bioscience and a member of the editorial board of the Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology. Dr. Branch is a fellow of the American College of Forensic Examiners and a diplomate of the American Board of Forensic Medicine. She earned her DVM from Tuskegee University and her PhD in veterinary medical sciences (comparative biomedical sciences), pharmacology tract, from North Carolina State University. GREGORY BRENT is professor of medicine and physiology at The David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Brent is also chief of the Endocrinology and Diabetes Section of the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System and director of its fellowship program in endocrinology, metabolism, and diabetes. Dr. Brent’s research interests include the molecular mechanisms of thyroid hormone action, regulation of iodide uptake in thyroid and breast cancer, the influence of thyroid hormone on development, and thyroid disease in pregnancy. He is currently secretary of the American Thyroid Association. Dr. Brent has been an associate editor of the journal Thyroid, and he remains on the editorial board. He recently completed a term on the National Institutes of Health Endocrinology Study Section and chaired a Special Endocrinology Study Section. Dr. Brent earned his MD from the University of Southern California. ROSALIND BROWN is associate professor of pediatrics at Harvard University School of Medicine and director of clinical trials research in endocrinology at Children’s Hospital in Boston. She was formerly professor of pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and director of the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes at University of Massachusetts Memorial Health Center. Dr. Brown has published numerous articles, editorials, and book chapters with a special interest in thyroid development and disease and its consequences in childhood. She is a coeditor of the forthcoming 5th edition of Clinical Endocrinology. She has been a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism and Thyroid. Dr. Brown earned her MD from McGill University and is board-certified in pediatric endocrinology.

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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion CHARLES C. CAPEN is distinguished university professor and former chairman (1981-2002) of the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology (restructured as Veterinary Biosciences in 1994) at the Ohio State University. His research interests include the effects of environmental pollutants on thyroid and ovarian function in rodents and secondary mechanisms of oncogenesis, the comparative aspects of endocrine and metabolic diseases, the gene transfer of the sodium iodide symporter in prostate and mammary cancer, and humoral factors in cancer-associated hypercalcemia. He has consulted in the past on thyroid issues for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Food and Drug Administration, other federal agencies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and private clients. Dr. Capen was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1992 and is a diplomate and past president of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. He earned his DVM from Washington State University and his PhD from the Ohio State University. DAVID COOPER is professor of medicine-endocrinology at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also professor of international health at The Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Hygiene and International Health, director of the Thyroid Clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, and director of the Division of Endocrinology at the Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. His primary research interests are thyroid cancer, hyperthyroidism, and antithyroid drug pharmacology. Dr. Cooper earned his MD from Tufts University. RICHARD CORLEY is staff scientist in the biomonitoring and biologic modeling group at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy in Richland, Washington. Dr. Corley specializes in the development of physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, real-time breath analysis, dermal and inhalation bioavailability, and the development of three-dimensional computational fluid-dynamic models of the respiratory system. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers on oral, dermal, and inhalation toxicology; modes of action of a variety of industrial and consumer chemicals; and pharmacokinetic modeling and its applications in human health risk assessments. He received his PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. LINDA COWAN is George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Her research interests include cardiovascular

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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion disease and the relative importance of different risk factors in men and women and American Indian populations, neurologic disorders, perinatal epidemiology, and the application of epidemiology in the legal setting. Her recent research includes evaluating risk factors for abnormal fetal growth and adverse neurologic outcomes in infants and children and the role of inflammatory mediators in the pathology of the nervous system from infancy through old age. Dr. Cowan has served on several committees of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and is a member of the Advisory Board of the IOM Medical Follow-up Agency. She earned her PhD in epidemiology from The Johns Hopkins University. JAMES LAMB IV is senior vice president at The Weinberg Group Inc. He was previously senior vice president at Blasland, Bouck & Lee Sciences, Inc. His interests include risk assessment, general toxicology, carcinogenesis, and reproductive and developmental toxicology. Dr. Lamb has published extensively in those fields and in pesticide regulation and pathology. He has served on two National Research Council committees: the Committee on Risk Characterization and the Committee on Hormonally Active Agents in the Environment. Dr. Lamb is a past president and diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. He received his PhD in pathology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a JD from the North Carolina Central University School of Law. GEORGE LAMBERT is the director of the Center for Childhood Neurotoxicology and Exposure Assessment at the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute. The center is supported by competitively awarded grants from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Environmental Protection Agency, and the institute is sponsored by Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. Dr. Lambert is also an associate professor of pediatrics and director of the Division of Pediatric Pharmacology and Toxicology at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and is an attending neonatologist. His current research is focused on the influences of environmental exposure to neurotoxicants on children’s neurologic health, the presence of plasticizers in the human newborn, the effects of environmental endocrine disruption on hypospadism and cryptorchidism in children, in utero exposure to environmental chemicals and reproductive function in men, and the role of gene polymorphisms in birth defects. Dr. Lambert earned his MD from the University of Illinois at Chicago and completed his residency in pediatrics at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and a

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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion research fellowship in molecular teratology at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. R. MICHAEL MCCLAIN is a consultant in toxicology with McClain Associates and adjunct professor in the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Previously, he was distinguished research leader with Hoffmann-LaRoche, Inc. Dr. McClain is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology, a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences, and past president of the Society for Toxicology. He is experienced in teratology, reproductive toxicology, general toxicology, and carcinogenicity testing. His research activities include the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis in the thyroid, liver, and adrenals and the regulatory aspects of cancer risk assessment. He reviewed scientific studies on perchlorate for private clients and provided comments to the Environmental Protection Agency Peer Review Panel on Perchlorate in February 1999. Dr. McClain received his PhD in pharmacology from the University of Iowa. SUSAN SCHANTZ is professor of toxicology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is director of a Children’s Environmental Health Research Center and a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Environmental Toxicology Training Program. The center is supported by competitively awarded grants from NIEHS and the Environmental Protection Agency. She also chairs the Interdisciplinary Environmental Toxicology Program at the university. Dr. Schantz’s research interests include the effects of exposure to environmental neurotoxicants during development and aging—particularly the nervous system effects of polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and related compounds—and modeling human exposures to identify which chemicals mediate neuropsychologic effects. Dr. Schantz earned her PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. DALENE STANGL is director of the Institute of Statistics and Decision Sciences and professor of the practice of statistics and public policy at Duke University. Her research interests include analyzing and promoting a stronger link between statistical analysis and decision-making and promoting Bayesian statistical methods in health-related research. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Stangl has coedited two books: Bayesian Biostatistics (Marcel Dekker, 1996) and Meta-Analysis in Medicine and Health Policy (Marcel Dekker, 2000). She earned her PhD in statistics from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion LYNETTE STOKES is chief of the Bureau of Hazardous Materials and Toxic Substances in the Washington, DC, Environmental Health Administration within the Department of Health. Dr. Stokes has developed protocols and questionnaires for a cohort study of young adults to investigate neurologic, kidney, and reproductive outcomes associated with childhood lead exposure; designed and conducted epidemiologic analyses with univariate and multivariate methods; examined environmental factors associated with asthma; and copublished one of the first studies showing the relationship between childhood lead exposure and increased blood pressure in adults. She has also published on the neurotoxic effects of pesticides among agricultural workers. Previously, Dr. Stokes was an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. She received her MPH in epidemiology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and PhD in environmental health and toxicology (concentration in epidemiology) with a minor in neurotoxicology from the State University of New York, Albany. ROBERT D. UTIGER is clinical professor of medicine at the Harvard University School of Medicine and editor-in-chief of Clinical Thyroidology. He was a deputy editor of the New England Journal of Medicine from 1989 to 2000 and was editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism from 1983 to 1989. He is coeditor of Werner and Ingbar’s The Thyroid: A Fundamental and Clinical Text. He previously served on the faculty of the Washington University School of Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Dr. Utiger has extensive expertise in thyroid disease and pituitary-thyroid physiology. He is a master of the American College of Physicians. He served on the Institute of Medicine Committee on Medicare Coverage of Routine Thyroid Screening. Dr. Utiger earned his MD from the Washington University School of Medicine.