Study Committee Biographical Information

Susan Hanson, Chair, is Landry University Professor and Director of the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. She is an urban geographer with interests in gender and economy, transportation, and sustainability. She has published numerous papers and journal articles on the travel patterns of individuals and households in urban areas and on gender issues in local labor markets. Dr. Hanson has been an editor of three geography journals—Economic Geography, the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, and The Professional Geographer—and currently serves on the editorial boards of several other journals. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (Section 64) and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. She is a Past President of the Association of American Geographers.


Bobbie A. Berkowitz, Vice Chair, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychosocial and Community Health at the University of Washington’s School of Nursing and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington’s School of Public Health. Dr. Berkowitz also serves as Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Turning Point National Program Office, whose mission is to transform and strengthen the public health system in the United States by creating a network of public health partners across the country to broaden community participation in defining, assessing, prioritizing, and addressing important health issues. Her research interests include public health



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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 Study Committee Biographical Information Susan Hanson, Chair, is Landry University Professor and Director of the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University. She is an urban geographer with interests in gender and economy, transportation, and sustainability. She has published numerous papers and journal articles on the travel patterns of individuals and households in urban areas and on gender issues in local labor markets. Dr. Hanson has been an editor of three geography journals—Economic Geography, the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, and The Professional Geographer—and currently serves on the editorial boards of several other journals. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (Section 64) and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. She is a Past President of the Association of American Geographers. Bobbie A. Berkowitz, Vice Chair, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychosocial and Community Health at the University of Washington’s School of Nursing and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Health Services at the University of Washington’s School of Public Health. Dr. Berkowitz also serves as Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Turning Point National Program Office, whose mission is to transform and strengthen the public health system in the United States by creating a network of public health partners across the country to broaden community participation in defining, assessing, prioritizing, and addressing important health issues. Her research interests include public health

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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 policy, determinants of health and population health outcomes, information technology, and the interaction and intersection of public health with other sectors, including community groups, the private sector, health care, and policy. Dr. Berkowitz is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Section 10, Other Health Professionals. She previously served as Cochair of the IOM Committee on Using Performance Monitoring to Improve Community Health. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. Barbara E. Ainsworth is a Professor in the Department of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences at San Diego State University. Her principal area of research is physical activity, including epidemiology, surveillance, and assessment, and environmental determinants of physical activity. Dr. Ainsworth also focuses on the physical activity needs and interventions directed at women and minorities. She is a fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine and an editorial board member of the Journal of Physical Activity and Health and the International Journal of Nutrition and Physical Activity. Steven N. Blair is President and CEO of the Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas. His research focuses on associations between lifestyle and health with emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. Dr. Blair served as the first president of the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity and held the position of Senior Scientific Editor for the Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health. Dr. Blair also served as a committee member on the IOM study to Develop Criteria for Evaluating the Outcomes of Approaches to Prevent and Treat Obesity. Robert B. Cervero is Professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California, Berkeley. Before joining the faculty in 1980, he was a transportation planner in Los Angeles; Billings, Montana; Atlanta; and Norfolk, Virginia. Dr. Cervero has written extensively on such issues as transit and urban form, jobs–housing balance, joint development planning, and commuting. He is the author of several well-known transportation books, including The Transit Metropolis, Transit Villages

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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 in the 21st Century, America’s Suburban Centers, Paratransit in America, and Suburban Gridlock. He was the principal investigator and primary author of the recent Transit Cooperative Research Program study on Transit Oriented Development (TOD) in America. Dr. Cervero serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Public Transportation. He is a Fellow of the Urban Land Institute and World Bank Institute and chairs the National Advisory Board of the Active Living Policy and Environmental Studies Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Cervero was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Transportation Options for Megacities in Developing Nations and the Committee on National Urban Policy. Donald D. T. Chen is Founding Executive Director and CEO of Smart Growth America (SGA), a nationwide coalition of more than 100 partner organizations working to realize a shared vision of growth that protects the environment while developing the economy, advances social equity, promotes affordable housing and community development, and preserves farmland. Before helping create SGA, Mr. Chen was Research Director for the Surface Transportation Policy Project, Senior Research Associate at the Rocky Mountain Institute, and Researcher at the World Resources Institute. He cochairs the Board of the Environmental Leadership Program, is President of the Board of the Institute for Location Efficiency, serves on the Board of West Harlem Environmental Action, serves on the Advisory Board of Grist Magazine, is Vice Chair of the Congress for the New Urbanism’s Transportation Task Force, and is an Associate Member of the Northeast Environmental Justice Network. Randall Crane is Professor of Urban Planning in the School of Public Affairs and the Institute of the Environment at the University of California at Los Angeles. His research interests include urban environmental and development problems both in the United States and abroad, with a focus on behavior–built environment interactions. Among his current projects, Dr. Crane is studying sprawl and smart growth. He is coauthor with Marlon Boarnet of Travel by Design: The Influence of Urban Form on Travel (Oxford, 2001). Dr. Crane

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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 served on NRC’s Committee on the Use of the Mexico City Aquifer as a Water Supply Resource. Mindy Thompson Fullilove is Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Public Health at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Her research interests include community health issues such as AIDS, violence, and substance abuse in low-income communities. Dr. Fullilove is an expert in the field of qualitative research and community health and has published a number of articles and books, including The House of Joshua: Meditations on Family and Place. She also served on the Task Force for the Guide to Community Preventive Services, which examines issues from obesity and physical activity to cancer screening and diabetes management. Dr. Fullilove has been a member of the NRC/IOM Board on Children, Youth, and Families and has served on several other NRC and IOM committees. Genevieve Giuliano is Professor in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development at the University of Southern California (USC) and Director of the USC/California State University Long Beach Metrans Transportation Center. Dr. Giuliano’s research interests include the relationship between land use and transportation, transportation policy evaluation, travel behavior, and the role of information technology in transportation. She has published more than 100 papers and reports and has presented her research at numerous conferences in the United States and abroad. She is currently a member of two international research consortia and serves on the editorial boards of several professional journals. She is a member and former Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Executive Committee and is a National Associate of the National Academies. T. Keith Lawton recently retired as Director of Technical Services in the Planning Department at Metro, the metropolitan planning organization for the Portland, Oregon, area. Mr. Lawton led the model development work at Metro, where he concentrated on bringing pedestrian environment variables into the modeling process. Most recently, he was involved in the development of activity-based

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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 models that consider daily activity schedules and use tours, rather than trips, as the unit of travel. Mr. Lawton was also involved in the federally supported activity-based model development known as TRANSIMS at the Los Alamos National Laboratories. He was on the Editorial Board of the journal Transportation. He is past Chair and a current member of TRB’s Transportation Demand Forecasting Committee and past member of the TRB Committee to Review the Bureau of Transportation Statistics’ Survey Programs and of the TRB Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program. Patricia L. Mokhtarian is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Associate Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Davis. Before coming to Davis, she spent 9 years in regional planning and consulting in Southern California. Dr. Mokhtarian specializes in the study of travel behavior. Her research has focused on the travel-related impacts of telecommunications technologies, attitudes toward travel itself, and the role of lifestyle and attitudes in the relationship between residential location and travel behavior. She is on the editorial advisory boards of Transportation Research and Transportation and is a past board member of the International Association for Travel Behavior Research. Dr. Mokhtarian serves on the Executive Committee of the University of California Transportation Center. She is a former member of TRB’s Group 1 Council, former founding chair and member of the TRB Telecommunications and Travel Behavior Committee, and a member of the TRB Traveler Behavior and Values Committee. Kenneth E. Powell is Chief, Chronic Disease, Injury, and Environmental Epidemiology Section, Division of Public Health, Georgia Department of Human Resources. The relationship between physical activity and health has been an important theme during his career as an epidemiologist. He initiated the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s epidemiologic work in the area by consolidating the scientific literature and setting the public health research agenda. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians,

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Does the Built Environment Influence Physical Activity? Examining the Evidence - Special Report 282 American College of Epidemiology, and American College of Sports Medicine. Jane C. Stutts is Associate Director for Social and Behavioral Research at the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center. Her areas of research include bicycle and pedestrian safety, older driver safety and mobility, drowsy and distracted driving, crash data analysis, and injury prevention. She has published numerous journal articles and reports in each of these areas. Dr. Stutts is a member of the editorial advisory board of Accident Analysis and Prevention and of the Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine. She currently serves on the TRB System Users Group Council and on the Safety and Mobility of Older Persons Committee. She is past Chair of the TRB Bicycle Transportation Committee and was a member of the Committee for the Conference on Transportation in an Aging Society: A Decade of Experience. Richard P. Voith is Senior Vice President and Principal of Econsult Corporation, which provides economic consulting services to assist business and public policy decision makers. He is also the Executive Director of the Greater Philadelphia Transportation Initiative, an organization dedicated to transportation policy analysis and research in Greater Philadelphia. Before joining Econsult, Dr. Voith served as Economic Advisor, Senior Economist and Research Advisor, Senior Economist, and Economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia. He held the position of Adjunct Professor in the Real Estate Department of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He was on the Board of Directors of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority and served as its Vice Chairman. Dr. Voith is an economist and expert in transportation and real estate economics, including the impacts of transportation and other policies on the real estate market and development patterns. He is currently a member of the editorial board of Real Estate Economics, the Research Committee of the Metropolitan Philadelphia Policy Center, and the Research Advisory Group of the Greater Philadelphia Regional Review. Dr. Voith is a member of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.