Appendix A
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION OF COMMITTEE

Charles F. Stevens (Chair) is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Vincent J. Coates Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, CA. Previously, he was professor and Chair of the Section of Molecular Neurobiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Stevens’s research centers on mechanisms responsible for synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, using a combination of molecular biological, electrophysiological, anatomical, and theoretical methods. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Stevens served on a number of NRC committees and as chair of the Committee on Possible Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Biological Systems. In addition to his publications in the field of neurobiology, he authored a book on the core theories of modern physics. Dr. Stevens serves as an advisor to a telecommunications firm on the possible health effects of cell phone use. He received his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University.

Jean M. Andino is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida. She is also affiliated with the university's School of Natural Resources and the Environment and serves as the Technical Leader for Air Revitalization in the NASA-Johnson Space Center-sponsored Environmental Systems Commercial Space Technology Center. Her research focuses on air pollution, specifically the chemical kinetics and mechanisms pertinent to air pollut-



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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants Appendix A BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION OF COMMITTEE Charles F. Stevens (Chair) is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Vincent J. Coates Professor of Molecular Neurobiology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, CA. Previously, he was professor and Chair of the Section of Molecular Neurobiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Stevens’s research centers on mechanisms responsible for synaptic transmission in the central nervous system, using a combination of molecular biological, electrophysiological, anatomical, and theoretical methods. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Stevens served on a number of NRC committees and as chair of the Committee on Possible Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Biological Systems. In addition to his publications in the field of neurobiology, he authored a book on the core theories of modern physics. Dr. Stevens serves as an advisor to a telecommunications firm on the possible health effects of cell phone use. He received his M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine and his Ph.D. from Rockefeller University. Jean M. Andino is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida. She is also affiliated with the university's School of Natural Resources and the Environment and serves as the Technical Leader for Air Revitalization in the NASA-Johnson Space Center-sponsored Environmental Systems Commercial Space Technology Center. Her research focuses on air pollution, specifically the chemical kinetics and mechanisms pertinent to air pollut-

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants ant formation and control. From 1997 to 2002, Dr. Andino was a National Science Foundation CAREER award recipient. She earned her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Lyle R. Chinkin is the senior vice president for Emissions, Policy, and Geographic Information Systems Services at Sonoma Technology, Inc. (STI). He also serves as STI's corporate General Manager. Those business areas encompass the preparation and assessment of stationary and mobile source emission inventories for use in air quality analyses and control strategy development. Mr. Chinkin has expertise in emission inventory preparation and assessment and air quality analyses. He has performed numerous emission inventory and air quality studies primarily for government agencies. He also has directed analyses for industrial associations. His work involves emission inventory field measurements, surveys, development, improvement, preparation, and evaluation. Mr. Chinkin earned an M.S. in atmospheric science from the University of California, Davis. Herek L. Clack is an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. His research interests include transport processes within multiphase flows, and design and development of advanced thermofluid processes with application toward combustion and combustion emissions. Currently, his primary research involves developing methods to control mercury emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. In January, 2004, Dr. Clack was awarded a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Development CAREER award. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Edwin H. Clark, II is president of Clean Sites Inc. in Alexandria, VA. He is a former secretary of Natural Resources and Environmental Control for the State of Delaware, vice president of the Conservation Foundation, vice president of the World Wildlife Fund, and associate assistant administrator for pesticides and toxic substances in EPA. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and on several committees, including the Committee on Risk-Based Criteria for Non-RCRA Hazardous Waste and the Committee to Review EPA’s Research Grants Program. He holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from Princeton University.

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants John C. Crittenden is the Richard Snell Presidential Chair in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Arizona State University (ASU). His research expertise includes sustainability, pollution prevention, physical-chemical treatment processes in air and wastewater, and modeling of fixed-bed reactors and adsorbers. Dr. Crittenden is the codirector of the Sustainable Technologies Program at ASU and directed the National Center for Clean and Industrial and Treatment Technologies (CenCITT) for 10 years. CenCITT conducted research on environmentally responsible manufacturing and involved 60 faculty from 16 academic units and over 200 graduate students. Dr. Crittenden is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is an associate editor of the journal Environmental Science and Technology. Dr. Crittenden received a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Michigan. H. Christopher Frey is a professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at the North Carolina State University. Dr. Frey's research is in the areas of environmental control, energy utilization, and modeling methods applicable to exposure assessment. He is involved in a number of different projects, including assessment of advanced technology for controlling sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, advanced electric power generation and end-use technologies for transfer to developing countries, and optimal design capability for coal gasification systems. Dr. Frey's research and consulting work has been funded by a number of sources, including EPA, DOE, NSF, consulting firms, industry, universities, and nonprofit organizations. Dr. Frey has contributed to assessments and guidance documents particularly pertaining to uncertainties in emissions characterization, exposure assessment, and risk assessment for organizations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), NARSTO, and the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization (WHO/FAO). He serves on EPA’s Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) Scientific Advisory Panel and is president-elect of the Society for Risk Analysis. He earned a Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Benjamin F. Hobbs is a professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics (joint) at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Hobbs’s research activities involve the development and application of systems analysis

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants and economic methods to analyze energy, water, and environmental problems. He currently has research projects investigating regulatory and economic influences on the electric power sector. Dr. Hobbs has received funding for research and consulting from various sources including EPA, U.S. Geological Survey, National Science Foundation, and industry, such as the Baltimore Gas & Electric Corporation and the Electric Power Research Institute. He is a member of the California Independent System Operator Market Surveillance Committee. His Ph.D. is in environmental systems engineering from Cornell University. Jonathan I. Levy is an assistant professor of environmental health and risk assessment in the Departments of Environmental Health and Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Levy's research centers on developing models to quantitatively assess the environmental and health impacts of air pollution on local, regional, and national scales, the focus being on urban environments. This work involves the evaluation of exposure using a combination of atmospheric dispersion modeling, predictive statistical models, and field measurements. Dr. Levy has published several papers that model emissions from power plants. He earned a Sc.D. from the Harvard School of Public Health. Thomas A. Louis is professor of biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He earned a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from Columbia University. His research interests include risk assessment, environmental health and public policy, and development of related statistical approaches. Current applications include assessing the health effects of airborne particulate matter, assessing the cardiopulmonary complications of AIDS therapy, and clinical quality improvement. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He serves on the Health Review Committee of the Health Effects Institute and on the EPA's Science Advisory Board Drinking Water Committee. Dr. Louis’s previous National Academies service includes the Committee on National Statistics, the Board of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Medical Follow-up Agency, the IOM Panel to Assess the Health Consequences of Service in the Persian Gulf War, the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, and the Committee on the Use of Third Party Toxicity Research with Human Research Participants. He also chaired the Panel on Formula Allocation of Federal and State Program Funds.

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants Brian F. Mannix is a senior research fellow in the Regulatory Studies Program of the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. Previously, he served in a variety of positions, including deputy secretary of natural resources under Virginia Governors George Allen and Jim Gilmore and director of science and technology studies for the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation. In addition, he has worked within numerous federal government agencies, including the EPA, the Department of Energy, the Office of Management and Budget, and the Council on Wage and Price Stability. Mr. Mannix received an A.M. in chemistry from Harvard University and an M.P.P. in public policy from the Kennedy School of Government. Joe L. Mauderly is vice president of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute; president of its subsidiary, the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute; director of one of its research programs, the National Environmental Respiratory Center; and former director of the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Dr. Mauderly received his D.V.M. degree from Kansas State University, and after brief periods in clinical practice and the U.S. Air force, specialized in research on comparative respiratory physiology, comparative pulmonary responses to inhaled toxicants, and the adverse effects of materials inhaled in the workplace and environment. During the past decade, his research has focused on the health effects of complex mixtures of air contaminants, including engine emissions. He is an adjunct professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico and on the editorial board of Inhalation Toxicology. He is a member of the Particulate Matter Panel of EPA's Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) and member or chairman of several research center advisory committees. His past appointments include chairman of the CASAC of the EPA Science Advisory Board, chair and member of several National Research Council committees, chairman of the Environmental and Occupational Health Assembly of the American Thoracic Society, president of the Inhalation Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology, member of the Research Committee of the Health Effects Institute, chairman of the Air Pollution Health Advisory Committee of the Electric Power Research Institute, associate editor of Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, and editorial board member of Experimental Lung Research. Craig N. Oren is a professor at the Rutgers School of Law. Mr. Oren has written extensively on the Clean Air Act, including the New Source Review provisions of the Act. He received his A.B. and J.D. degrees

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants from the University of California, Berkeley. From 1979 to 1983, Mr. Oren served as assistant counsel to the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. He served on the Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants and the Committee on Haze in National Parks and Wilderness Areas. Karen L. Palmer is a senior fellow at Resources for the Future in the Quality of the Environment Division. She served as an economist with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Office of Economic Policy. Her research interests include the environmental and economic consequences of electricity restructuring and of new environmental policy proposals targeted at the electricity sector; the regulation of solid waste and recycling; and the cost-effectiveness of environmental regulation. Dr. Palmer also is studying the costs and environmental benefits of the product stewardship movement, which among other things encourages industry to play a more active role in dealing with the environmental consequences of products at the end of their useful lives. She received a Ph.D. in economics from Boston College. Lynn M. Russell is an associate professor in the Center for Atmospheric Sciences, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego. Her research is in the area of aerosol particle chemistry, including the behavior of particles under pristine and anthropogenically influenced conditions. Her research interests span experimental and modeling approaches to aerosol evolution in the atmosphere, incorporating chemical and physical mechanisms in aerosol-cloud interactions, organic aerosols, and their radiative effects. She has served on several NRC committees, including the Panel on Aerosol Radiative Forcing and Climate Change, the Committee to Review NARSTO's Scientific Assessment of Airborne Particulate Matter, and the Panel on Atmospheric Effects of Aviation. She holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Mitchell J. Small is the H. John Heinz III Professor of Environmental Engineering in the Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. He earned his Ph.D. in environmental and water resources engineering from the University of Michigan. Dr. Small's research focuses on mathematical modeling of environmental quality, including statistical methods and uncertainty analysis, human exposure modeling, indoor air pollution, human risk perception and decision making, and integrated assessment

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Interim Report of the Committee on Changes in New Source Review Programs for Stationary Sources of Air Pollutants models for acid deposition and global climate change. Dr. Small has served on EPA's Office of Research and Development's Board of Scientific Counselors and is currently a member of EPA's Science Advisory Board. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on Remediation Priorities for Hazardous Waste Sites and the Committee on Environmental Remediation at Naval Facilities. Dr. Small is an associate editor for the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Ira B. Tager is professor of epidemiology in the Division of Public Health, Biology, and Epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley, and is codirector and principal investigator for the Center for Family and Community Health. He holds an M.D. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and an M.P.H from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Tager's research interests include the development of exposure assessment instruments for studies of health effects of chronic ambient ozone exposure in childhood and adolescence, the effects of ozone exposure on pulmonary function, and the effects of oxidant and particulate air pollution on cardiorespiratory morbidity and mortality as well as morbidity from asthma in children. Dr. Tager was a member of the NRC Committee on Air Quality in Passenger Cabins of Commercial Aircraft. He currently serves as a member of the Research Committee for the Health Effects Institute. John G. Watson is a research professor in the Division of Atmospheric Sciences at the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada. His research includes the development and evaluation of measurement processes, receptor models for source apportionment, and the effects of measurement uncertainty on model results. Dr. Watson is the primary author of a chemical mass balance receptor model and its application and validation protocol. Dr. Watson is currently principal investigator for the California regional particulate and air quality study, the Fresno Supersite, the southern Nevada air quality study, and for a Department of Defense program to quantify emissions from nonroad diesel engines. He recently completed the 2002 Air and Waste Management Association's critical review of Visibility: Science and Regulation that examined evolution and scientific justification for EPA's Regional Haze Rule. He earned a Ph.D. in environmental science from the Oregon Graduate Institute.