E
Input from the Community

A broad call for community input to the committee was issued in autumn 2003, shortly after the committee’s first meeting. The announcement was sent to several professional societies and appeared on the committee’s public Web page. It is excerpted below.

Dear Colleague,

The National Research Council (NRC) has established a committee called the Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science (COHMAG). Its mission is to produce a report on the facilities available to scientists worldwide for doing experiments at high magnetic fields (i.e., at fields above 12 T), the current state of the many scientific disciplines that use high field magnets, the scientific opportunities these fields present, and the prospects for advances in related technologies. With this message COHMAG invites you to send it any information or opinions you feel should be taken into account during its deliberations. Specifically, how have high magnetic fields had an impact on your research? How have you taken advantage of facilities at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) or other high-field magnet centers? What new facilities or new capabilities would be most valuable to you? In what new areas of research are high magnetic fields likely to have a large impact? Any other comments?

Why did the NRC set up COHMAG? Earlier this year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned the NRC to generate a report on the scientific issues that surround the generation of high magnetic fields and their use in scientific research.



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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science E Input from the Community A broad call for community input to the committee was issued in autumn 2003, shortly after the committee’s first meeting. The announcement was sent to several professional societies and appeared on the committee’s public Web page. It is excerpted below. Dear Colleague, The National Research Council (NRC) has established a committee called the Committee on Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science (COHMAG). Its mission is to produce a report on the facilities available to scientists worldwide for doing experiments at high magnetic fields (i.e., at fields above 12 T), the current state of the many scientific disciplines that use high field magnets, the scientific opportunities these fields present, and the prospects for advances in related technologies. With this message COHMAG invites you to send it any information or opinions you feel should be taken into account during its deliberations. Specifically, how have high magnetic fields had an impact on your research? How have you taken advantage of facilities at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) or other high-field magnet centers? What new facilities or new capabilities would be most valuable to you? In what new areas of research are high magnetic fields likely to have a large impact? Any other comments? Why did the NRC set up COHMAG? Earlier this year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned the NRC to generate a report on the scientific issues that surround the generation of high magnetic fields and their use in scientific research.

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science Given that the last major report covering this area was issued a decade and a half ago, a new study seems both appropriate and timely. COHMAG is distributing this message to as many members of the high magnetic field community as possible because it wants to be sure that all voices have been heard before it issues its report. In order to reach as many people as possible, this message is being distributed using e-mail lists obtained from several different organizations, and they, inevitably, are overlapping. We apologize if you have received multiple copies of this message. If you have information you want to transmit to COHMAG, please communicate it by e-mail to cohmag@nas.edu, and thank you for your help. For COHMAG, Peter B. Moore, Chair Written responses were received from the following individuals: Richard Beger, National Center for Toxicological Research Oscar Bernhal, University of California at Los Angeles Paul Canfield, Ames Research Center Walter Chazin, Vanderbilt University David Cowburn, New York Structural Biology Center Jack Crow, NHMFL Kwaku Dayie, Cleveland Clinic Foundation M. Dolotenko, Russian Federal Nuclear Center Thomas Erber, Illinois Institute of Technology Bolzonia Fulvio, IMEM, Italy Roy Goodrich, Louisiana State University Jurgen Haase, Leibniz Institute, Dresden Michael Hall, Texas A&M University William Halperin, Northwestern University Bruce Hammer, University of Minnesota Fritz Herlach, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Seung Hong, Oxford Instruments Robert Leif, Newport Instruments Gerard Ludtka, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Gerhard Martinez, Grenoble High Magnetic Field Lab Andrew Maverick, Louisiana State University Craig Milling, Magnetic Resonance Microsensors Martha Morton, University of Connecticut William Moulton, NHMFL Jan Musfeldt, University of Tennessee

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Opportunities in High Magnetic Field Science Florin Neascu, International School of Choeifat, United Arab Emirates Dean Peterson, Los Alamos National Laboratory Neela Poorasingh, City University of New York Al Redfield, Brandeis University Jim Rhyne, Los Alamos National Laboratory Larry Rubin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Joshua Telser, Roosevelt University Cees Thieme, American Superconductor Corp. Sheldon Schultz, University of California at San Diego Horst Stormer, Columbia University David Weber, University of Maryland Roy Weinstein, University of Houston Nicholas Zumbulyadis, Eastman Kodak