Appendix C
Biographical Sketches of Members of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem

JEAN M. BAHR, CHAIR, is professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she has been a faculty member since 1987. She served as chair of the Water Resources Management Program, UW Institute for Environmental Studies, from 1995-99 and she is also a member of the Geological Engineering Program faculty. Her current research focuses on the interactions between physical and chemical processes that control mass transport in ground water. She earned a B.A in geology from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied earth sciences (hydrogeology) from Stanford University. She has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management and several of its committees. She is a National Associate of the National Academies.


SCOTT W. NIXON, VICE-CHAIR, is professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate classes in oceanography and ecology. His current research interests include coastal ecology, with emphasis on estuaries, lagoons, and wetlands. He is a member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board and has severed on several of its committees. Dr. Nixon received a B.A. in biology from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in botany/ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.


BARBARA L. BEDFORD is Senior Research Associate at Cornell University. She joined the Department of Natural Resources there in 1989, having served as the Associate Director of Cornell University's Ecosystems Research Center since 1980. Her research focuses on wetland plant diversity, what controls it, how human actions affect it, and how to manage it. She and her students work primarily in fens, bogs, riparian wetlands, and Great Lakes wetlands. She has been recognized twice by Cornell University for outstanding accomplishments in teaching, and serves on the University's selection committees for Rhodes, Marshall, and Udall Scholars. She has served on the Management Advisory Group to the Assistant Administrator for Water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Wetland Experts Team for The Nature Conservancy's Wetland Management Network, and chaired the Scientific Oversight Committee for restoration of the Hole-in-the-Donut in Everglades National Park. She currently serves on the national advisory boards for the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research Program and the Smithsonian Institution's Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. The Association of State Wetland Managers awarded her their first National Award for Excellence in wetland science applications and policy in 1996. In 2001 she received the National Merit Award from the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) for outstanding achievements in wetland science. She recently was elected vice-president of the SWS and will become president in 2006. She served on the NRC Committee on Review of Scientific Research Programs at the Smithsonian Institution, and the Committee on Wetlands Characterization. She received a B.A. in theology and philosophy from Marquette University's Honors Program in 1968, and an M.S. and Ph.D from the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1977and 1980, respectively.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 122
Re-Engineering Water Storage in the Everglades: Risks and Opportunities Appendix C Biographical Sketches of Members of the Committee on Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem JEAN M. BAHR, CHAIR, is professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she has been a faculty member since 1987. She served as chair of the Water Resources Management Program, UW Institute for Environmental Studies, from 1995-99 and she is also a member of the Geological Engineering Program faculty. Her current research focuses on the interactions between physical and chemical processes that control mass transport in ground water. She earned a B.A in geology from Yale University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied earth sciences (hydrogeology) from Stanford University. She has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management and several of its committees. She is a National Associate of the National Academies. SCOTT W. NIXON, VICE-CHAIR, is professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. He currently teaches both graduate and undergraduate classes in oceanography and ecology. His current research interests include coastal ecology, with emphasis on estuaries, lagoons, and wetlands. He is a member of the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board and has severed on several of its committees. Dr. Nixon received a B.A. in biology from the University of Delaware and a Ph.D. in botany/ecology from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. BARBARA L. BEDFORD is Senior Research Associate at Cornell University. She joined the Department of Natural Resources there in 1989, having served as the Associate Director of Cornell University's Ecosystems Research Center since 1980. Her research focuses on wetland plant diversity, what controls it, how human actions affect it, and how to manage it. She and her students work primarily in fens, bogs, riparian wetlands, and Great Lakes wetlands. She has been recognized twice by Cornell University for outstanding accomplishments in teaching, and serves on the University's selection committees for Rhodes, Marshall, and Udall Scholars. She has served on the Management Advisory Group to the Assistant Administrator for Water at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Wetland Experts Team for The Nature Conservancy's Wetland Management Network, and chaired the Scientific Oversight Committee for restoration of the Hole-in-the-Donut in Everglades National Park. She currently serves on the national advisory boards for the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research Program and the Smithsonian Institution's Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. The Association of State Wetland Managers awarded her their first National Award for Excellence in wetland science applications and policy in 1996. In 2001 she received the National Merit Award from the Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) for outstanding achievements in wetland science. She recently was elected vice-president of the SWS and will become president in 2006. She served on the NRC Committee on Review of Scientific Research Programs at the Smithsonian Institution, and the Committee on Wetlands Characterization. She received a B.A. in theology and philosophy from Marquette University's Honors Program in 1968, and an M.S. and Ph.D from the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1977and 1980, respectively.

OCR for page 122
Re-Engineering Water Storage in the Everglades: Risks and Opportunities LINDA K. BLUM is research associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at the University of Virginia. Her current research projects include study of mechanisms controlling bacterial community abundance, productivity, and structure in tidal marsh creeks; impacts of microbial processes on water quality; organic matter accretion in salt marsh sediments; and rhizosphere effects on organic matter decay in anaerobic sediments. Dr. Blum earned a B.S. and M.S. in forestry from Michigan Technological University and a Ph.D. in soil science from Cornell University. She chaired the NRC committee that recently completed a study of the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative. PATRICK L. BREZONIK is professor of environmental engineering and director of the Water Resources Research Center at the University of Minnesota. Prior to his appointment at the University of Minnesota in the mid-1980s, Dr. Brezonik was professor of water chemistry and environmental science at the University of Florida. His research interests focus on biogeochemical processes in aquatic systems, with special emphasis on the impacts of human activity on water quality and element cycles in lakes. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Water Science and Technology Board and as a member of several of its committees. He earned a B.S. in chemistry from Marquette University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in water chemistry from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. FRANK W. DAVIS is a Professor in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California Santa Barbara (USCB). He received his B.A. in Biology from Williams College and Ph.D. from the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University. He joined UCSB in 1983, and established the UCSB Biogeography Lab in 1991. His research interests are in landscape ecology, regional conservation planning, and spatial decision support systems. He was Deputy Director of the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis between 1995 and 1998. Dr. Davis has been a member of three prior NRC committees. WILLIAM L. GRAF is Education Foundation University Professor and Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and hydrology, as well as policy for public land and water. His research and teaching have focused on river-channel change, human impacts on river processes, morphology, and ecology, along with contaminant transport and storage in river systems. In the arena of public policy, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making, and the resolution of conflicts among economic development, historical preservation, and environmental restoration for rivers. He has authored or edited 7 books, written more than 120 scientific papers, book chapters, and reports, and given more than 90 public presentations. He is past President of the Association of American Geographers and has been an officer in the Geological Society of America. President Clinton appointed him to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers. His NRC service includes past membership on the Water Science and Technology Board and present membership on the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He chaired the NRC Committee on Research Priorities in Geography at the U.S. Geological Survey and the Committee on Watershed Management, and was a member of several other NRC committees. He is a National Associate of the National Academies. His Ph.D. is from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. WAYNE C. HUBER is professor in the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. Prior to moving to Oregon State in 1991, he served 23 years on the faculty of the Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences at the University of Florida where he engaged in several studies involving the hydrology and water quality of south Florida regions. His technical interests are principally in the areas of surface hydrology, stormwater management, nonpoint source pollution, and transport processes related to water quality. He is one of the original authors of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) and continues to maintain the model for the EPA. Dr. Huber holds a B.S. in engineering from the California Institute of Technology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in civil engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

OCR for page 122
Re-Engineering Water Storage in the Everglades: Risks and Opportunities STEPHEN R. HUMPHREY is director of academic programs of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Florida and was its founding dean. He also serves as affiliate professor of Latin American Studies, wildlife ecology, and zoology. He also has been the curator in ecology for the Florida Museum of Natural History since 1980. Dr. Humphrey has authored and co-authored numerous articles and books on endangered specied and effects of urbanization on wildlife. He holds B.A. in biology from Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana and a Ph.D. in zoology from Oklahoma State University. He is former chair of the Environmental Regulatory Commission of the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation and a member of the Florida Panther Technical Advisory Council of the Florida Game Commission. KENNETH W. POTTER is professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His expertise is in hydrology and water resources, including hydrologic modeling, estimation of hydrologic risk, estimation of hydrologic budgets, watershed monitoring and assessment, and aquatic ecosystem restoration. He received his B.S. in geology from Louisiana State University and his Ph.D. in geography and environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University. He has served as a member of the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board and several of its committees. KENNETH H. RECKHOW is a professor of water resources at Duke University and is the director of the Water Resources Research Institute at North Carolina State University. Dr. Reckhow’s research interests focus on the development, evaluation, and application of models for the management of water quality. In particular, he is interested in the effect of uncertainty on model specification, parameter estimation, and model applications. Recent work has expanded this theme to consider the effect of scientific uncertainties on water quality decision making. He recently chaired the NRC Committee to Assess the Scientific Basis of the Total Maximum Daily Load Approach to Water Pollution Reduction. He was also a member of the NRC Committee to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. Dr. Reckhow received a B.S. in engineering physics from Cornell University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental science and engineering from Harvard University. LARRY ROBINSON is director of the Environmental Sciences Institute at Florida A&M University where he is also a professor. At Florida A&M University he has led efforts to establish B.S. and Ph.D. programs in environmental science in 1998 and 1999, respectively. His research interests include environmental chemistry and the application of nuclear methods to detect trace elements in environmental matrices and environmental policy and management. Previously he was group leader of a neutron activation analysis laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). At ORNL he served on the National Laboratory Diversity Council and was President of the Oak Ridge Branch of the NAACP. Dr. Robinson earned a B.S. in chemistry, summa cum laude, from Memphis State University and a Ph.D. in nuclear chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. HENRY J. VAUX, JR is professor of resource economics emeritus at the University of California and Associate Vice President emeritus of the University of California System. He is currently affiliated with the Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Berkeley. In addition to serving as Associate Vice President, Agriculture and Natural Resources, he previously served as Director of the University of California Water Resources Center. His principal research interests are the economics of water use and water quality. Prior to joining the University of California, he worked at the Office of Management and Budget and served on the staff of the National Water Commission. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Dr. Vaux has served on numerous NRC committees and was chair of the Water Science and Technology Board from 1997 to 2001. JEFFREY R. WALTERS is Bailey Professor of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, a position he has held since 1994. His professional experience includes assistant, associate,

OCR for page 122
Re-Engineering Water Storage in the Everglades: Risks and Opportunities and full professorships at North Carolina State University from 1980 until 1994. Dr. Walters’ research interests are in avian ecology, behavior and conservation. He has done extensive research on the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, and has served on several panels and committees evaluating science relevant to avian conservation, including chairing an American Ornithologists Union Conservation Committee Review that looked at the biology, status, and management of the Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow, a bird native to the Everglades. He is a fellow of the American Ornithologist Union and a member of many other scientific organizations. He holds a B.A. from West Virginia University and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

OCR for page 122
Re-Engineering Water Storage in the Everglades: Risks and Opportunities This page intentionally left blank.