Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

David E. Daniel, Chair, is an expert in the performance of engineered disposal cells and barriers to contaminant migration. He is dean of the College of Engineering and Gutgsell Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research has focused on engineered containment systems for waste disposal and on the cleanup of contaminated waste disposal sites. Prior to his appointments at the University of Illinois, Dr. Daniel was L.B. Meaders Professor of Engineering at the University of Texas, where he taught for 15 years. He has won several awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society for Testing and Materials. He is currently a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He has also served on the NRC’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and Geotechnical Board. Dr. Daniel received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering, all from the University of Texas. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000.


John S. Applegate, Vice Chair, is the associate dean for academic affairs and Walter W. Foskett Professor of Law at the Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington. He teaches and writes about environmental law, regulation of hazardous substances, risk, and environmental reme-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members David E. Daniel, Chair, is an expert in the performance of engineered disposal cells and barriers to contaminant migration. He is dean of the College of Engineering and Gutgsell Professor of Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research has focused on engineered containment systems for waste disposal and on the cleanup of contaminated waste disposal sites. Prior to his appointments at the University of Illinois, Dr. Daniel was L.B. Meaders Professor of Engineering at the University of Texas, where he taught for 15 years. He has won several awards from the American Society of Civil Engineers and the American Society for Testing and Materials. He is currently a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He has also served on the NRC’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and Geotechnical Board. Dr. Daniel received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering, all from the University of Texas. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2000. John S. Applegate, Vice Chair, is the associate dean for academic affairs and Walter W. Foskett Professor of Law at the Indiana University School of Law-Bloomington. He teaches and writes about environmental law, regulation of hazardous substances, risk, and environmental reme-

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste diation. Mr. Applegate is chair of the Risk Science and Law Specialty Group of the Society for Risk Analysis. He co-chaired the Long-Term Stewardship and Accelerated Cleanup Subcommittees of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Environmental Management Advisory Board. He was previously the James B. Helmer, Jr., Professor of Law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law; chair of the Fernald Citizens Advisory Board; visiting professor at Vanderbilt University Law School; a judicial clerk to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit; and an attorney in private practice. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of more than 20 articles and two books on risk and environmental law. Mr. Applegate received his B.A. in English from Haverford College and his J.D. from Harvard Law School. Lynn Anspaugh is a research professor in the Division of Radiobiology of the School of Medicine at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City. Dr. Anspaugh is an internationally recognized expert in dose reconstruction, leading an effort to assess doses due to environmental releases of radionuclides from the first nuclear weapons production plant in Russia. He held several leadership positions at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, including division leader of the Environmental Sciences Division and director of the Risk Sciences Center. His research has included the environmental effects of utilizing geothermal energy, reconstruction of radiation doses from early fallout of nuclear weapons tests, and calculation of radiation doses from nuclear reactor accidents. Dr. Anspaugh received his B.A. in physics from Nebraska Wesleyan University, Lincoln; and his M. Bioradiology (health physics) and Ph.D. (biophysics), both from the University of California at Berkeley. Allen G. Croff retired in 2003 as manager of Environmental Quality R&D Program Development in the Biological and Environmental Sciences Directorate at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). From when he joined ORNL in 1974, he was involved in numerous technical studies that have focused on waste management and nuclear fuel cycles. He recently chaired the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements committee that produced the 2002 report titled Risk-Based Classification of Radioactive and Hazardous Chemical Wastes. He is now vice chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste. Mr. Croff has served on several NRC committees, and is currently a member of the NRC’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Michigan State University, a nuclear engineering degree from the Mas-

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste sachusetts Institute of Technology, and an M.B.A. from the University of Tennessee. Rodney C. Ewing is an expert in mineralogy and materials science. His research interests include the long-term durability of radioactive waste forms. He is a professor in the Department of Geological Sciences, with joint appointments in the Departments of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences and Materials Science and Engineering, at the University of Michigan. Dr. Ewing previously served for 23 years as a professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of New Mexico. He has served on several NRC committees, and is currently a member of the Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He is a past president of the International Union of Materials Research Societies and of the Mineralogical Society of America. Dr. Ewing received M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Stanford University. Paul A. Locke, a public health scientist and attorney, is a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Previously, he was general counsel and deputy director of Trust for America’s Health, a not-for-profit public health advocacy organization; deputy director of the Pew Environmental Health Commission at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health; and director of the Center for Public Health and Law at the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C. He has worked extensively on environmental health and policy issues, including radiation protection, indoor air quality, alternatives to animal testing, and risk assessment. Dr. Locke was chair of the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) environment section in 2001 and is currently secretary of the APHA Intersectional Council Steering Committee. He is a member of the editorial board of Risk Analysis: An International Journal, and is a past councilor and past member of the executive committee of the Society for Risk Analysis. Dr. Locke currently serves as a member of the NRC’s Board on Radioactive Waste Management. He holds an M.P.H. from Yale University School of Medicine and a Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also a graduate of Vanderbilt University School of Law and is licensed to practice before the bars of the States of New York and New Jersey, the District of Columbia, and the United States Supreme Court. Patricia A. Maurice is a professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame and director of the university’s

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste interdisciplinary Center for Environmental Science and Technology. Dr. Maurice’s research focuses on microbial, trace metal, and organic interactions with mineral surfaces from the atomic scale to the scale of entire watersheds. Her research encompasses the hydrology and biogeochemistry of freshwater wetlands and mineral-water interactions, the remediation of metal contamination, and global climate change. Dr. Maurice received her B.A. in earth and planetary sciences from the Johns Hopkins University, her M.S. in geology from Dartmouth College, and her Ph.D. in aqueous and surface geochemistry from Stanford University. Robin Rogers is an expert in separations chemistry and does research on prevention or chemical treatment of waste streams. He is professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Green Manufacturing at the University of Alabama. Dr. Rogers’ research interests include green-sustainable separation science and technology, aqueous biphasic systems, room- temperature ionic liquids, environmentally benign polymer resins, crystal engineering, and radiochemistry. Dr. Rogers is the editor of the American Chemical Society journal Crystal Growth & Design. He served on a NRC study on research needs for high-level radioactive waste. Dr. Rogers received his B.S. and Ph.D., both in chemistry, from the University of Alabama, and he reached the rank of presidential research professor at Northern Illinois University before returning to Alabama. Anne E. Smith is a vice president of Charles River Associates (CRA), an economics consulting firm. Prior to joining CRA, Dr. Smith was a vice president of Decision Focus Incorporated and served as an economist in the Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Smith specializes in the integrated assessment of environmental and energy policy decisions, including risk management, decision analysis, benefit-cost analysis, and economic modeling. She has applied these techniques to many types of policy decisions, including contaminated site cleanup, nuclear waste management, global climate change, air quality, and food safety. Dr. Smith has developed and reviewed decision support tools for risk-based ranking of contaminated sites and for making risk trade-offs in selecting remediation alternatives. She led an assessment of human and environmental risks at the DOE’s Fernald site that was part of a larger effort to report to the U.S. Congress on risks posed by U.S. nuclear weapons facilities. She has served on several NRC committees reviewing issues involving risk management within DOE’s Environmental Management program. Dr. Smith

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste received her B.A. in economics from Duke University and her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Stanford University. She also completed a Ph.D. minor in engineering-economic systems at Stanford University. Theofanis G. Theofanous is an expert in risk analysis and safety. He is a professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering with a joint appointment in the Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, and is the director of the Center for Risk Studies and Safety at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His current technical interests are risk assessment and management in complex technological and environmental systems. Dr. Theofanous has done innovative work analyzing and enhancing the safety of nuclear reactors, including development of a new methodology for accident analysis. He has received several commendations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as well as the Department of Energy’s E.O. Lawrence Medal in Nuclear Technology. Dr. Theofanous received his B.S. in chemical engineering from the National Technical University, Athens, Greece, and his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Minnesota. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998. Jeffrey Wong is the deputy director for science, pollution prevention and technology development for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). His office is engaged in environmental measurements, biological and exposure monitoring, toxicology and risk assessment, pollution prevention and waste minimization, and verification and evaluation of technologies involved in hazardous waste detection, containment, treatment, disposal, or cleanup. Before his current appointment, Dr. Wong served as chief of DTSC’s Human and Ecological Risk Division since the early 1990s. In that position, he directed the scientific organization that gathers site characterization data and performs risk assessments in support of the state’s hazardous waste and site remediation programs. Dr. Wong has served on several NRC committees on issues related to hazardous waste and site cleanup, peer review teams examining DOE’s cleanup of the nuclear weapons complex, and programs on risk EPA assessment. He served by presidential appointment on the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board from 1996 until 2002. Dr. Wong received his B.A. in bacteriology, his M.S. in food science and technology, and his Ph.D. in pharmacology and toxicology, all from the University of California at Davis.

OCR for page 211
Risk and Decisions: About Disposition of Transuranic and High-Level Radioactive Waste This page intentionally left blank.