WEEK may have been unusual for you, I will ask about the amount you USUALLY spend.

  1. How much did (you/your household) ACTUALLY spend at supermarkets and grocery stores LAST WEEK (including any purchases made with food stamps)? How much of the (amount from last question) was for nonfood items, such as pet food, paper products, detergents, or cleaning supplies?

  2. How much did (you/your household) spend at stores such as meat markets, produce stands, bakeries, warehouse clubs, and convenience stores LAST WEEK (including any purchases made with food stamps)?

    How much of the (amount from last question) was for nonfood items, such as pet food, paper products, detergents, or cleaning supplies?

  3. How much did (you/your household) spend for food at restaurants, fast food places, cafeterias, and vending machines LAST WEEK?

  4. How much did (you/your household) spend for food at any other kind of place LAST WEEK?

(Let’s see, it seems that (you/your household) did not buy any food LAST WEEK. /Let’s see, (you/your household) spent about (fill with S8O) on food LAST WEEK.) Now think about how much (you/your household) USUALLY (spend/spends). How much (do you/does your household) USUALLY spend on food at all the different places we’ve been talking about IN A WEEK? (Please include any purchases made with food stamps). Do not include nonfood items such as pet food, paper products, detergent, or cleaning supplies.

II. MINIMUM SPENDING NEED TO HAVE ENOUGH FOOD

  1. In order to buy just enough food to meet (your needs/the needs of your household), would you need to spend more than you do now, or could you spend less?



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement