Richard A. Fenske, Ph.D., is Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and Director of the Pacific Northwest Agricultural Safety and Health Center at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Fenske’s work has focused on the evaluation of environmental health risks in special populations. His specialty areas include health risks of pesticide exposures, development of new exposure assessment methods, and investigation of the role of skin exposure in workers and children. Dr. Fenske served on the Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2002 committee.


Jordan Firestone, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is Assistant Professor of Neurology and Director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Clinic at the University of Washington in Seattle. Dr. Firestone’s research involves chemical exposures and their interactions with individual genetic susceptibility in neurologic disease, with a special focus on Parkinson’s disease. His clinical specialty is in occupational neurotoxicology.


Thomas A. Gasiewicz, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of the Department of Environmental Medicine and Director of the Environmental Health Sciences Center in the Department of Environmental Medicine at the University of Rochester, School of Medicine. Dr. Gasiewicz has published extensively on the toxicokinetics of dioxin, dioxin toxicity, and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor in the molecular mechanism of dioxin toxicity. Dr. Gasiewicz served on the Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2000 and the Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2002 committees.


Claudia Hopenhayn, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Assistant Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the University of Kentucky School for Public Health. Her primary research focuses on cancer and reproductive outcomes within the context of environmental and occupational epidemiology and cancer control. Dr. Hopenhyn’s expertise combines toxicology, biologic markers of exposure and effect, statistics, risk factors, and assessment of intervention within a framework of epidemiology and multidisciplinary collaborations, both in the United States and abroad.


Nancy I. Kerkvliet, Ph.D., is Professor in the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University. Dr. Kerkvliet’s research has focused on animal modeling to explain how specific chemicals alter immune function and how immune suppression caused by dioxin is mediated by the aryl hydorcarbon receptor, a transcription factor that is activated upon ligand binding. She previously served on the Subcommittee of Jet Propulsion Fuel 8 and the Committee on Toxicology.



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