Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

ARLEEN LEIBOWITZ (Chair) is professor of public policy in the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Affairs. She conducts research in health and labor economics with particular interest in investments in human capital and in health. She has examined the role of maternal education in investments in children, educational outcomes for children, the demand for child care, the effect of education on women’s labor force participation, secular trends in women’s labor supply, and the effect of maternity leave on new mothers’ return to work. She has also worked extensively in health economics and policy, studying cost-sharing and children’s health care use, birth rates, and expenditures for prescription and over-the-counter drugs. Her current work in health examines how public policies, such as Medicaid, and private policies, such as managed care, affect the amount and kind of health care obtained by children and by persons living with HIV. She heads the Evaluation Core of the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services and served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics from 2001 to 2004. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University.

WILLIAM T. BIELBY is professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, and from 1977 through 2004 he was on the sociology faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He served as president of the American Sociological Association from 2002 to 2003. His research interests include the economy and society, quantitative methods, organizations, gender, labor markets, and discrimination. In addition to being a contributor to numerous journals, including Sociological Perspectives and the Ameri-



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Analyzing Information on Women-Owned Small Businesses in Federal Contracting Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff ARLEEN LEIBOWITZ (Chair) is professor of public policy in the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Public Affairs. She conducts research in health and labor economics with particular interest in investments in human capital and in health. She has examined the role of maternal education in investments in children, educational outcomes for children, the demand for child care, the effect of education on women’s labor force participation, secular trends in women’s labor supply, and the effect of maternity leave on new mothers’ return to work. She has also worked extensively in health economics and policy, studying cost-sharing and children’s health care use, birth rates, and expenditures for prescription and over-the-counter drugs. Her current work in health examines how public policies, such as Medicaid, and private policies, such as managed care, affect the amount and kind of health care obtained by children and by persons living with HIV. She heads the Evaluation Core of the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services and served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics from 2001 to 2004. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University. WILLIAM T. BIELBY is professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, and from 1977 through 2004 he was on the sociology faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He served as president of the American Sociological Association from 2002 to 2003. His research interests include the economy and society, quantitative methods, organizations, gender, labor markets, and discrimination. In addition to being a contributor to numerous journals, including Sociological Perspectives and the Ameri-

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Analyzing Information on Women-Owned Small Businesses in Federal Contracting can Sociological Review, he has testified and submitted expert reports in over 40 trials throughout the country dealing mostly with labor relations. He is currently doing research on the use of statistical evidence in class action employment discrimination litigation. He has an M.A. in economics and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. CONSTANCE F. CITRO (Study Director) is director of the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous projects, including the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She has a B.A. from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. JONATHAN S. LEONARD is the Quist professor of business ethics in the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley, as well as the current chair of the Haas Economic Analysis and Policy Group. He previously served on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers and as a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research interests include employee incentives, affirmative action, job creation, and workplace regulation, and he has published papers on these topics in numerous journals, including Economic Policy and the Journal of Economic Perspectives. He has M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics from Harvard University. JOHN E. ROLPH is a professor in the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California and also holds appointments in the Department of Mathematics and the Law School. Previously he spent 24 years as a statistician at RAND, 12 of them as founding head of RAND’s statistics group. His areas of expertise include empirical Bayes estimation and the application of statistics to public policy and the law. He is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, a fellow of the American Statistical Association, a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and a national associate of the National Academies. He has served as a member and chair of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Committee

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Analyzing Information on Women-Owned Small Businesses in Federal Contracting on National Statistics and as a member of the NRC Committee on Law and Justice. In addition, he has served on several NRC panels, on topics including operational test design in defense systems, methods for assessing discrimination, assessing evaluation studies of bilingual education, and decennial census methodology. He currently chairs the NRC panel on assessing the feasibility, accuracy, and technical capability of a national ballistics imaging database. He has been editor of Chance magazine and has served in many other editorial capacities. He has a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of California, Berkeley. PATRICIA A. ROOS is professor of sociology at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. Her current research interests include work, family, and community; the sociology of work; and gender. She has published extensively on gender and work, including two books: Gender and Work: A Comparative Analysis of Industrial Societies and (with Barbara Reskin) Job Queues, Gender Queues: Explaining Women’s Inroads into Male Occupations. In 1998-1999, she served as vice president of the American Sociological Association. She also served two 3-year terms on the association’s executive council. At Rutgers, she served as chair of the Sociology Department and dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences. She has been awarded grants from the National Science, Rockefeller, and Alfred P. Sloan Foundations, and has served on several professional editorial boards, advisory councils, and National Science Foundation (NSF) grant review panels. She has an M.A. from the University of California, Davis, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, both in sociology. J.H. (RIP) VERKERKE is professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law and is director of the Program for Employment and Labor Law Studies. His areas of expertise include employment discrimination, sexual and racial harassment, disability discrimination and accommodation, the use of statistical evidence to prove discrimination, economic analysis of law, mediation and arbitration of employment disputes, and contract law. He has M.Phil. and J.D. degrees from Yale University. ANDREW A. WHITE (Study Director through May 2004) is a senior consultant at StatTech, Inc. He consults with the National Academies, The Brookings Institution, federal agencies, and others on survey design, data research, development, and dissemination strategy, and a variety of other topics. A former Director of the Committee on National Statistics, he developed and provided oversight to over 35 studies on a diverse range of topics, and served as study director for projects on census methods, social science research in the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and new directions for health statistics. He is a former executive staff member, research staff chief,

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Analyzing Information on Women-Owned Small Businesses in Federal Contracting and senior survey designer for the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). He has written numerous articles and technical reports and lectured on a wide variety of statistical and survey-related topics. He served as senior statistician for several national surveys including the National Health Interview Survey and the National Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and provided statistical advice to other countries through the NCHS international statistics program. He holds a B.A. in political science and M.P.H. and Ph.D. degrees in biostatistics from the University of Michigan.