Appendix A:
Workshop Agenda

Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy

The National Academies

Workshop on Research and Development Data Needs

April 7, 2003

500 Fifth Street, N.W.

Washington, DC

8:30 AM

Introduction: Bronwyn Hall, University of California, Berkeley

8:45 AM

Users and Uses

 

There are many indications that research, development and innovation have become more critical to economic growth, corporate performance and management, and national government missions and have changed in composition, orientation, organization, location, etc.; but public data are collected in essentially the same ways and in some cases not at all. What new, prospective, or higher priority uses (e.g. national economic accounting, international comparisons, government or corporate management) will influence the demand for national R&D data and perhaps require changes in what is collected and how?

 

Chair: Lawrence Brown, Wharton School of Business

 

Speakers:

 

 

Barbara Fraumeni, Bureau of Economic Analysis

 

 

Andrew Wyckoff and Dominique Guellec, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

 

 

David Trinkle, Office of Management and Budget

 

 

Gregory Tassey, National Institute of Standards and Technology

10:00 AM

Recent Developments in NSF's R&D Data Portfolio

 

John Jankowksi, Science Resources Statistics Division, NSF



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OCR for page 46
Research and Development Data Needs: Proceedings of a Workshop Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy The National Academies Workshop on Research and Development Data Needs April 7, 2003 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 8:30 AM Introduction: Bronwyn Hall, University of California, Berkeley 8:45 AM Users and Uses   There are many indications that research, development and innovation have become more critical to economic growth, corporate performance and management, and national government missions and have changed in composition, orientation, organization, location, etc.; but public data are collected in essentially the same ways and in some cases not at all. What new, prospective, or higher priority uses (e.g. national economic accounting, international comparisons, government or corporate management) will influence the demand for national R&D data and perhaps require changes in what is collected and how?   Chair: Lawrence Brown, Wharton School of Business   Speakers:     Barbara Fraumeni, Bureau of Economic Analysis     Andrew Wyckoff and Dominique Guellec, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development     David Trinkle, Office of Management and Budget     Gregory Tassey, National Institute of Standards and Technology 10:00 AM Recent Developments in NSF's R&D Data Portfolio   John Jankowksi, Science Resources Statistics Division, NSF

OCR for page 46
Research and Development Data Needs: Proceedings of a Workshop 10:15 AM Composition of R&D   We need information on the composition of R&D linked to R&D outputs (on the private side, innovation and productivity; on the public side, publications and human resources). But it is not clear that current categories (either basic/applied/development or the research field taxonomies) are useful, up-to-date, and meaningful to respondents. How can this situation be improved? Do we need better information on cross-disciplinary research? Industry data are collected at the corporate level, obscuring the heterogeneity of activity in large, diversified companies that account for the majority of R&D and distorting the allocation across sectors. Moreover, there are many uncertainties about technical activity in the service sector. What level of detail on activities in diversified companies is it feasible to collect? Does corporate “management by the numbers”] make it easier? How can we illuminate technical activity in service companies?   Chair: William Barron, Princeton University   A. Field of public sector (federal and university) research     Michael Saltzman, Department of Energy Charlotte Kuh, National Research Council   B. Area of business R&D activity     Charles Duke, Xerox Corporation William Long, Business Performance Research Associates, Inc. Ron Jarmin, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Bureau of the Census Michael Gallaher, Research Triangle Institute John Alic, Consultant 12:00 PM Lunch 12:45 PM R&D Collaborations   Corporations are outsourcing more R&D and collaborating with rivals, customers, suppliers, and university scientists; but the data capture only a narrow slice of these relationships and reveal little about the magnitude of the investments, technical foci, or duration. Are private data sources adequate over the long term? What do firms trade? What relationships do we want to capture on an ongoing basis and how should we do that?   Chair: Don Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute   Speakers: Nick Vonortas, George Washington University Josh Lerner, Harvard Business School 2:00 PM Break

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Research and Development Data Needs: Proceedings of a Workshop 2:15 PM Location of R&D Activity   Where R&D is performed is important to public officials at all levels. Domestically, the clustering of technology-based industry and associated infrastructure (including research universities) is viewed as critical to growth, and the focus of public economic development support is frequently regional or local; but data are only national, state, and institutional. If finer-grained industrial data were collected, would it be possible to protect the confidentiality of respondents? Cross-national investment is increasing rapidly, and the current survey collects some data, but there are gaps. How can they be overcome?   Chair: Patrick Windham, Windham Consulting   A. Local     Rob Atkinson, Progressive Policy Institute   B. International     Walter Kuemmerle, Harvard Business School Obie Whichard and Ned Howenstine, Bureau of Economic Analysis Robert McGuckin, The Conference Board 4:00 PM Concluding Observations   Al Johnson, Corning and the Industrial Research Institute Bronwyn Hall, University of California, Berkeley Fred Gault, Statistics Canada 5:00 PM Adjourn