Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members and Speakers

PLANNING COMMITTEE

Peter A. Hancock is provost distinguished research professor in the Department of Psychology, the Institute for Simulation and Training, and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Central Florida. Previously, he founded and was the director of the Human Factors Research Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. His current experimental work concerns the evaluation of behavioral response to high-stress conditions. His theoretical work concerns human relations with technology and the possible futures of this symbiosis. He is the author of Essays on the Future of Human-Machine Systems (1997), as well as numerous refereed scientific articles and publications. He is the editor of a number of books, including Human Performance and Ergonomics in the Handbook of Perception and Cognition series (1999) and Stress, Workload, and Fatigue (2001). He is the principal investigator of the Multi-Disciplinary University Research Initiative, overseeing research on stress, workload, and performance. He has a Ph.D. in motor performance from the University of Illinois, Champaign (1983) and a D.Sc. in human-machine systems from Loughborough University, England (2001).

John D. Lee is associate professor of industrial engineering at the University of Iowa. His research enhances the safety and acceptance of complex human-machine systems by considering how technology mediates atten-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Planning Committee Members and Speakers PLANNING COMMITTEE Peter A. Hancock is provost distinguished research professor in the Department of Psychology, the Institute for Simulation and Training, and the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Central Florida. Previously, he founded and was the director of the Human Factors Research Laboratory at the University of Minnesota. His current experimental work concerns the evaluation of behavioral response to high-stress conditions. His theoretical work concerns human relations with technology and the possible futures of this symbiosis. He is the author of Essays on the Future of Human-Machine Systems (1997), as well as numerous refereed scientific articles and publications. He is the editor of a number of books, including Human Performance and Ergonomics in the Handbook of Perception and Cognition series (1999) and Stress, Workload, and Fatigue (2001). He is the principal investigator of the Multi-Disciplinary University Research Initiative, overseeing research on stress, workload, and performance. He has a Ph.D. in motor performance from the University of Illinois, Champaign (1983) and a D.Sc. in human-machine systems from Loughborough University, England (2001). John D. Lee is associate professor of industrial engineering at the University of Iowa. His research enhances the safety and acceptance of complex human-machine systems by considering how technology mediates atten-

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary tion. His research also investigates the role of trust in mediating to help people manage imperfect automation more effectively. He is on the editorial board of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and the Human Factors Transportation Journal; he is a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Transportation Research Board. He has B.S. and B.A. degrees from Lehigh University and an M.S. in industrial engineering and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois (1992). Joel S. Warm is a professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cincinnati, Ohio. His research specializes in sensation/perception, human performance, human factors, and perceived mental workload. His current interests include sustained attention in terms of test of theoretical models, studies of the psychophysical, psychophysiological, and training determinants of performance efficiency and the perceived mental workload of vigilance tasks. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Alabama (1966). SPEAKERS Julie A. Adams is currently an assistant professor of computer science at Vanderbilt University. Before joining the Vanderbilt faculty, she was an assistant professor at Rochester Institute of Technology. She also spent five years working in industrial human factors positions for Honeywell, Inc., and Eastman Kodak Co. Her research focuses on the development of usable, efficient, and effective human-robotic interfaces. She has a Ph.D. in human-robotic interaction from the University of Pennsylvania’s General Robotics, Automation, Sensing and Perception Laboratory (1995). Michael Barnes is the co-manager (with TARDEC, the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center) of the Army’s Science and Technology Objective: Human Robot Interaction and Teaming, representing the Human Research and Engineering Directorate. While working for the U.S. Navy, he conducted applied research on the human element of varied radar systems, high-performance fighters, adaptive automation, and unmanned aerial vehicles. He was also the Aegis Combat System manager for the General Electric Corporation. He has published numerous peer-reviewed conference papers, journal articles, and book chapters on applied human factors research. Currently he is the field element chief at Ft. Huachuca, Arizona, supporting the military intelligence school

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary and futures development in such programs as unmanned aerial vehicle training and human factors research. He has an M.A. in experimental psychology from New Mexico State University. Kevin B. Bennett is a professor and the graduate program director of the Human Factors/Industrial Organization program at Wright State University. Previously he worked in industry for three years and was hired as an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Wright State University in 1988. He is an active member of the Human Factors Society and served on the editorial board of the Human Factors Journal for over a decade. His research interests are in theoretical and applied aspects of computerized decision support. He has designed and evaluated interfaces and graphical displays in aviation, process control, and military command and control. Wright State University is an academic partner in the Army’s Advanced Decision Architectures Collaborative Technology Alliance. He has a Ph.D. in applied-experimental psychology from the Catholic University of America (1984). Nancy Cooke is a professor of applied psychology at Arizona State University East and acting science director of the Cognitive Engineering Research Institute. She served on the faculty at Rice University from 1987 to 1992 and at New Mexico State University from 1992-2002. Her recent research focuses on team cognition and its assessment. She conducts empirical team research in the context of the Cognitive Engineering Research on Team Tasks lab’s unmanned aerial vehicle synthetic task environment. Recent projects involve modeling the acquisition and retention of team coordination using a dynamic systems approach and developing embedded measures of team cognition through automated communication analyses. She has a B.A. from George Mason University (1981) and a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from New Mexico State University (1987). Mary (Missy) Cummings is the Boeing assistant professor in the Aeronautics and Astronautics Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her previous teaching experience includes instructing for the U.S. Navy at Pennsylvania State University and as an assistant professor for the Virginia Tech Engineering Fundamentals Division. Her research interests include human supervisory control, collaborative human-computer decision making, decision support, information complexity in displays, and the ethical and social impact of technology. A naval officer and military pilot

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary from 1988 to 1999, she was one of the Navy’s first female fighter pilots. She has a B.S. in mathematics from the United States Naval Academy (1988), an M.S. in space systems engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School (1994), and a Ph.D. in systems engineering from the University of Virginia (2003). David Dahn is a principal for applied technology at Micro Analysis & Design in Boulder, Colorado. He has been leading developments for tactical control units that include control of unmanned air and ground systems for the past four years. The tactical control units range from the Crew-Integration and Automation Testbed Mounted Multipanel Display System of the U.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center to the Future Force Warrior’s PDA class display system. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Arizona State University and an M.S. in computer engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology. Mica R. Endsley is president of SA Technologies in Marietta, Georgia. Prior to forming SA Technologies, she was a visiting associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and associate professor of industrial engineering at Texas Tech University. She is the author of numerous scientific articles and reports on subjects that include the implementation of technological change, the impact of automation, the design of expert system interfaces, new methods for knowledge elicitation for artificial intelligence system development, pilot decision making, and situation awareness. She is coauthor of a new book entitled Designing for Situation Awareness (2003). She has a Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Southern California. Michael Goodrich is an associate professor in computer science at Brigham Young University. From 1996 to 1998 he was a postdoctoral research associate with Nissan CBR in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His research is focused on human-robotic interaction, multiagent learning, and decision theory. He has authored many conference and journal papers and is currently serving as chair of HRI 2006, a new conference on human-robotic interaction sponsored by the Association for Computing Machinery in cooperation with the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, and the Systems, Man, and Cybernetics Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He has

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary a Ph.D. from Brigham Young University in electrical and computer engineering (1996). Robert R. Hoffman is a research scientist at the State of Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. He is also an adjunct instructor at the Department of Psychology of the University of West Florida in Pensacola. His work spans the fields of remote sensing, meteorology, experimental psychology, human factors, and artificial intelligence. His work in psycholinguistics bridged to the field of artificial intelligence, in which he has contributed to emerging notions of human-centered computing. In the area of human factors he has made contributions to the methodology of knowledge elicitation and workstation and display design for environmental science and is currently helping to forge the theory of complex cognitive systems. He has B.A. (1972), M.A. (1974), and Ph.D. (1976) degrees, the latter in experimental psychology, from the University of Cincinnati. Christopher Miller is co-owner and principal scientist for Smart Information Flow Technologies, a small business focused on research and development in human interaction with advanced technologies. Its primary emphases have been on the development of a Playbook™ approach to human interaction with robots and unmanned vehicles, as well as on the use and consideration of “etiquette” in the design of advanced human-machine systems. He spent 12 years in Honeywell’s research and development laboratory working on advanced human-automation integration programs, such as the U.S. Air Force’s Pilot’s Associate and the U.S. Army’s Rotorcraft Pilot’s Associate—as well as related Honeywell projects for oil refineries, building security systems, and in-home elder care. He has master’s and Ph.D. degrees in cognitive psychology from the University of Chicago. Robin Roberson Murphy is a professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of South Florida, with a joint appointment in cognitive and neural sciences in the Department of Psychology. She is the author of numerous publications in the areas of sensor fusion, human-robot interaction, and rescue robotics, as well as the textbook, Introduction to AI Robotics (2000). She is director of the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center on Safety, Security, and Rescue Technologies and the Center for Robot-Assisted Search and Rescue (CRASAR) at the University of South Florida. She leads the CRASAR rescue robot response team, the only such team in

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary the world. She has a B.M.E. in mechanical engineering (1980) and M.S. (1989) and Ph.D. (1992) degrees, the latter in computer science, from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Richard W. Pew is principal scientist at BBN Technologies in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His work has focused on the design of interactive computer systems to make them more compatible with human users. He has conducted studies of improved means of introducing human factors requirements in preliminary design. He has developed specific design recommendations for improved human interfaces in systems to be used by individuals with no knowledge of computers. He has also participated in experimental studies measuring human performance in computer-based systems. He was the first chair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Human Factors, chair of its Panel Modeling Human Behavior and Command Decision Making, and cochair of the Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from Cornell University (1956), an M.S. in psychology from Harvard University (1960), and a Ph.D. in psychology with a specialization in engineering psychology from the University of Michigan (1963). John Pye is senior managing engineer in the technology development practice of Exponent Failure Analysis Associates, located in Menlo Park, California. He has participated extensively in the U.S. Army’s transformational soldier programs, serving as the test and evaluation lead for the Land Warrior 1.0 program and as the Wolfpack chief engineer for the phase one Objective Force Warrior program. For the past year, he has been working with the Army’s Rapid Equipping Force on their Advanced Robotic Controller program, developing a universal wearable computer/robot interface for the dismounted soldier. A registered professional mechanical engineer in the State of California, he has a Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from Stanford University (1999). Thomas B. Sheridan is Ford professor of engineering and applied psychology emeritus in both the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and also senior transportation fellow at the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Volpe National Transportation Research Center. He has published numerous technical papers and five books and

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary has served on a number of government, National Research Council, and industrial advisory committees. A fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, he served as president of its Systems, Man and Cybernetics Society and editor of IEEE Transactions on Man-Machine Systems and received its Norbert Wiener and Joseph Wohl awards, as well as the Centennial Medal and the Third Millennium Medal. He was also president and is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and recipient of its Paul Fitts Education Award and the Arnold Small Distinguished Service Award. He is a fellow of the International Ergonomics Association and received the National Engineering Award of the American Association of Engineering Societies and the Oldenburger Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He has an S.M. degree from the University of California, an Sc.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an honorary doctorate from Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands. Charles Shoemaker manages the Army Research Laboratory’s Robotics Program Office. He is the program manager for the Demo III Experimental Unmanned Vehicle Program and is the consortium area manager for the Army’s Collaborative Technology Alliance-Robotics, a multiyear robotics research program including leading U.S university/industry/research organizations. His work in the development of autonomous mobility technology for Army systems was selected as the U.S. Army’s Laboratory of the Year for 2003. During his career in federal service, he has served in the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, the Laboratory Command of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and the Human Engineering Laboratory. He received the U.S. Army Meritorious Civilian Service Award and was selected in 1999 to receive the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s Al Aube award for contributions to the field of unmanned systems. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees with concentration in human factors from Loyola College of Maryland. James Szalma is a senior research scientist and the director of the Multi-University Research Initiative Operator Performance Under Stress Laboratory in the Psychology Department and the Institute for Simulation and Training at the University of Central Florida. His current research efforts are aimed at testing theoretical models of stress and performance. As part of this work, he is investigating individual differences in personality and their relation to performance, workload, stress, and coping strategies. He is also

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary conducting studies to empirically test a novel modification of signal detection theory, called fuzzy signal detection theory. He has a Ph.D. (1999) from the University of Cincinnati, where he investigated the performance, workload, and stress of monitoring tasks and the use of feedback in training for vigilance performance. Scott Thayer is systems scientist in the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the director of the Software Systems and Subterranean Robotics Groups in the Field Robotics Center. He is primary or coauthor of numerous refereed conference and journal papers in the areas of computer vision, robotics, and embedded systems and networks. His work has been featured in various news and media outlets, including Nature, Scientific American, Newsweek, and the History and the Discovery cable TV channels. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the International Society for Optical Engineering, and Eta Kappa Nu. He has a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Tennessee (1998). Geb Thomas is an assistant professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at the University of Iowa. Previously he worked briefly at NASA Ames Research Center. His research interest is primarily in the areas of mobile robot interface design, virtual reality, and haptics. He has authored or coauthored numerous technical papers and journal articles, many of which describe large, international rover field trials sponsored by NASA and conducted in deserts around the world. He has a Ph.D. in industrial engineering from the Pennsylvania State University (1997). Christopher Wickens is professor of psychology and head of the Division of Human Factors at the University of Illinois Institute of Aviation. His research interests are in applications of psychology to human performance and cognition in complex, safety-critical systems, such as aircraft and unmanned aerial and ground vehicles. Particular interest is focused on the design of displays based on principles of human attention and developing computational models of human performance in such systems. He is a member of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and of the American Psychological Association, and has received the Federal Aviation Administration’s 2001 award for excellence in research. He has published two major textbooks on human factors and engineering psychology. He has served as a member of

OCR for page 42
Interfaces for Ground and Air Military Robots: Workshop Summary the Committee on Human Factors, as well as its panels on pilot performance models and education of human factors specialists; he chaired panels on automation of air traffic control and on workload transition. He has a Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of Michigan (1974).