TABLE 1-1 Demographics of Persons in the NSCISC Database by Year of Injury

 

1973-1977

1995-1999

Gender (percent)

Male

82.7

79.5

Female

17.3

20.5

Age at Injury (percent)

1-15

7.7

3.0

16-30

61.6

42.1

31-45

17.7

28.1

46-60

8.8

15.1

61-75

3.6

8.5

76+

0.7

3.2

Mean Age (yr) at Injury

28.2

36.5

Race or Ethnicity (percent)

Caucasian

76.8

62.2

African American

14.9

23.7

Hispanic

6.2

10.9

Asian American

0.8

2.2

Native American

1.3

0.3

Other Race

0.0

0.7

NOTE: The NSCISC database includes data from an estimated 13 percent of new spinal cord injury cases in the United States. As of July 2004, the database contained information on 22,992 individuals who had sustained traumatic spinal cord injuries. Since 1973, 25 federally funded Model Spinal Cord Injury Care Systems have contributed data to the NSCISC database. Although the database has a large sample size and geographic diversity, it is not population based.

SOURCE: Reprinted with permission, from DeVivo et al., 2002. Copyright 2002 by Demos Medical Publishing.

graphic data for individuals with spinal cord injuries occurring in the periods from 1973 to 1977 and 1995 to 1999.

The nature and extent of spinal cord injuries vary widely, depending on the site of the injury and its severity. Table 1-2 highlights the heterogeneous nature of the functional outcomes resulting from spinal cord injuries. Each individual’s experience is unique in terms of the degree of paralysis and pain, the extent of spasticity, and the therapies involved in stabilizing autonomic system dysfunction. Therefore, how a spinal cord injury impacts a person’s life is highly individualized. Injuries to the upper sections of the spine nearest the head can result in quadriplegia (also termed tetraplegia), with the individual losing motor and sensory functions in the arms and legs, as well as bowel, bladder, chest, abdominal, and diaphragm function. Injuries occurring in the lower areas of the spine may



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement