cord injury. Many of the chapter’s recommendations for New York State are also applicable to other states interested in setting or revising strategic directions for their spinal cord injury research programs. The states can learn much from one another to develop and strengthen their spinal cord injury research programs.

STATE PROGRAMS AND LEGISLATION

Since 1988, 14 states have passed legislation that has resulted in annual funding for spinal cord injury research of about $27 million (Table 8-1).

TABLE 8-1 State Legislation Relevant to Spinal Cord Injury Research

State

Year Legislation Enacted

Year Legislation Proposed but Not Enacted

California

2000a

 

Colorado

 

2004a

Connecticut

1999

 

Florida

1988

Illinois

2000a

Indiana

1998

Iowa

 

2004a

Kansas

2001

Kentucky

1994

 

Maryland

2000

Massachusetts

2004a

Michigan

 

1989

Minnesota

2000a

Missouri

2001

 

New Jersey

1999a

New York

1998a

Ohio

 

2000a

Oregon

1999a

 

Pennsylvania

 

2000

South Carolina

2000

 

South Dakota

 

2003

Texas

 

1999a

Virginia

1997

 

Washington

 

2004a

aThe legislation specifically notes that research is conducted to cure spinal cord injuries.

NOTE: The data were compiled in October 2004 and are based on a review of state legislature websites, searches on Lexis-Nexis, and telephone interviews. The table includes the year that the legislation was first enacted or considered (i.e., data on later years when the legislation was revised or considered are not included). Enacted legislation supersedes proposed legislation (e.g., legislation considered in 1996 but approved in 1998 is listed as enacted in 1998 and does not appear in the proposed legislation column).



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