TABLE 1-3 Costs of Spinal Cord Injuries to Society (1996)

Service

Costs ($ millions)

First-Year Costs

First-year medical and related costs

2,366.57

Initial home modifications

221.58

Total first-year costs

2,588.15

Annual Costs

Medical care (recurring)

1,624.86

Medications and supplies

449.02

Vehicle modifications

103.01

Home modifications (recurring)

67.83

Wheelchairs

235.60

Personal assistance

2,068.10

Total annual costs

4,548.42

Indirect Costs

2,591.11

Total Costs

9,727.68

 

SOURCE: Reprinted with permission, from Berkowitz et al., 1998. Copyright 1998 by Demos Medical Publishing.

TABLE 1-4 Average Yearly Individual Expenses (2004 dollars)

Severity of Injury

First-Year Expenses

Expenses for Each Subsequent Year

High tetraplegia (C1 to C4)

$682,957

$122,334

Low tetraplegia (C5 to C8)

$441,025

$50,110

Paraplegia

$249,549

$25,394

Incomplete motor function

$201,273

$14,106

NOTE: C1 to C8 refer to the site of the injury on the cervical section of the spinal column (see Chapter 2).

SOURCE: Reprinted with permission, from NSCISC, 2004. Copyright 2004 by NSCISC.

vidual over his or her lifetime can be as high as $2.7 million for someone with high tetraplegia who is injured at 25 years of age (NSCISC, 2004). On the other hand, the average age at diagnosis of many of the diseases that affect the nervous system is older, resulting in lower lifetime costs. For example, only 15 percent of those diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease are younger than age 50. Of the individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, 3 percent are between the ages of 65 to 74 at the time of diagnosis, whereas nearly



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