Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Richard J. Ayen, Chair, a member of the NRC Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons (I and II), received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. Dr. Ayen, now retired, was director of technology for Waste Management, Inc. He managed all aspects of Waste Management’s Clemson Technical Center, including treatability studies and technology demonstrations for the treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste. His experience includes 20 years at Stauffer Chemical Company, where he was manager of the Process Development Department at Stauffer’s Eastern Research Center. Dr. Ayen has published extensively in his fields of interest. He has extensive experience in the evaluation and development of new technologies for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, industrial, and municipal wastes.


Martin Gollin, a process design engineer affiliated with Carmagen Engineering, Inc., and, before that, with ARCO Chemical Co., has over 20 years of experience in process engineering and management of capital projects, risk assessment, process safety, loss prevention, and product development. From 1988 to 1999 he served as process design manager, environment, health, and safety manager, and principal engineer at ARCO Chemical Co. As an independent consultant Mr. Gollin has participated in various activities involving chemical demilitarization programs and facilities. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in chemical engineering from Loughborough University of Technology. Mr. Gollin has expertise in process design and process safety.


Gary S, Groenewold has conducted research in surface chemistry, gas-phase chemistry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry at the Idaho National Engineering Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) since 1991. His research has focused on determining the speciation of adsorbed toxic metals (e.g., Hg, Al, and Cu) and organic compounds (e.g., VX, G agents, HD, organophosphates, amines, and sulfides). Prior to this, Dr. Groenewold served 3 years in line management at the INEEL and as the technical leader of an environmental organic analysis group. Before coming to the INEEL, Dr. Groenewold worked in anticancer drug discovery for Bristol-Myers, using mass spectrometry as an identification tool. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Nebraska, where he studied ion-molecule condensation and elimination reactions in the gas phase. He has authored 50 scientific publications on these subjects. Dr. Groenewold has expertise in monitoring instrumentation.


Frederick T. Harper is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in the High Consequence Assessment and Technology Department. He manages and performs research in the following areas: (1) explosive aerosolization of nuclear materials from nuclear weapons and other nuclear sources (experimental and analytical), including materials in metal, ceramic, powder, and liquid forms; (2) effects of chemical and biological releases from explosive and nonexplosive dissemination mechanisms (experimental and analytical); and (3) the energetic dissipation of shock waves in an aqueous foam medium (experimental and analytical). Dr. Harper is a deployable member of the DOE emergency response team that uses tools developed from the above research. Recently, he served as a substantive expert in the area of explosive aerosolization and effects of aerosol releases for several national and international counterterrorism exercises and workgroups. He has a bachelor’s degree in physics from Yale University, a master’s in nuclear engineering from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of New Mexico.


Paul F. Kavanaugh, Brigadier General (retired), is an engineering management consultant. Before that, he was the director of government programs for Rust International, Inc., and director of strategic planning for Waste Management Environmental Services. In the Army, he served with the



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Impact of Revised Airborne Exposure Limits on Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Program Activities Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Richard J. Ayen, Chair, a member of the NRC Committee on Review and Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Demilitarization of Assembled Chemical Weapons (I and II), received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Illinois. Dr. Ayen, now retired, was director of technology for Waste Management, Inc. He managed all aspects of Waste Management’s Clemson Technical Center, including treatability studies and technology demonstrations for the treatment of hazardous and radioactive waste. His experience includes 20 years at Stauffer Chemical Company, where he was manager of the Process Development Department at Stauffer’s Eastern Research Center. Dr. Ayen has published extensively in his fields of interest. He has extensive experience in the evaluation and development of new technologies for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, industrial, and municipal wastes. Martin Gollin, a process design engineer affiliated with Carmagen Engineering, Inc., and, before that, with ARCO Chemical Co., has over 20 years of experience in process engineering and management of capital projects, risk assessment, process safety, loss prevention, and product development. From 1988 to 1999 he served as process design manager, environment, health, and safety manager, and principal engineer at ARCO Chemical Co. As an independent consultant Mr. Gollin has participated in various activities involving chemical demilitarization programs and facilities. He earned a B.S. and an M.S. in chemical engineering from Loughborough University of Technology. Mr. Gollin has expertise in process design and process safety. Gary S, Groenewold has conducted research in surface chemistry, gas-phase chemistry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry at the Idaho National Engineering Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) since 1991. His research has focused on determining the speciation of adsorbed toxic metals (e.g., Hg, Al, and Cu) and organic compounds (e.g., VX, G agents, HD, organophosphates, amines, and sulfides). Prior to this, Dr. Groenewold served 3 years in line management at the INEEL and as the technical leader of an environmental organic analysis group. Before coming to the INEEL, Dr. Groenewold worked in anticancer drug discovery for Bristol-Myers, using mass spectrometry as an identification tool. He received his Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Nebraska, where he studied ion-molecule condensation and elimination reactions in the gas phase. He has authored 50 scientific publications on these subjects. Dr. Groenewold has expertise in monitoring instrumentation. Frederick T. Harper is a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Laboratories in the High Consequence Assessment and Technology Department. He manages and performs research in the following areas: (1) explosive aerosolization of nuclear materials from nuclear weapons and other nuclear sources (experimental and analytical), including materials in metal, ceramic, powder, and liquid forms; (2) effects of chemical and biological releases from explosive and nonexplosive dissemination mechanisms (experimental and analytical); and (3) the energetic dissipation of shock waves in an aqueous foam medium (experimental and analytical). Dr. Harper is a deployable member of the DOE emergency response team that uses tools developed from the above research. Recently, he served as a substantive expert in the area of explosive aerosolization and effects of aerosol releases for several national and international counterterrorism exercises and workgroups. He has a bachelor’s degree in physics from Yale University, a master’s in nuclear engineering from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of New Mexico. Paul F. Kavanaugh, Brigadier General (retired), is an engineering management consultant. Before that, he was the director of government programs for Rust International, Inc., and director of strategic planning for Waste Management Environmental Services. In the Army, he served with the

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Impact of Revised Airborne Exposure Limits on Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Program Activities Army Corps of Engineers, the Department of Energy, and the Defense Nuclear Agency and managed projects at the U.S. Army Chemical Demilitarization Program at Johnston Atoll. General Kavanaugh earned a B.S. in civil engineering from Norwich University and an M.S. in civil engineering from Oklahoma State University. He has expertise in military and civil works design and construction. Todd A. Kimmell is principal investigator with the Environmental Assessment Division at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory. He is an environmental scientist and policy analyst with more than 25 years of experience in solid and hazardous waste management, permitting and regulatory compliance, cleanup programs, and environmental program and policy development. Mr. Kimmell has supported the Army’s chemical weapons storage programs and has contributed to the Army’s Assembled Chemical Weapons Assessment Program and the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program. Mr. Kimmell also has a strong background in analytical and physicochemical test method development and in analytical quality assurance and control. He presently serves the EPA Water Protection Task Force Core Group on environmental test methods for chemical, biological, and radiological assessment technologies. Mr. Kimmell also has extensive experience in environmental cleanup programs and is involved in environmental cleanup programs at chemical weapons disposal sites. He has also supported a number of environmental permitting programs at Army chemical weapons storage sites and at open burning/open detonation sites. Mr. Kimmell graduated from the George Washington University with an M.S. in environmental sciences. He has expertise in environmental assessment and regulatory and permitting issues. Loren D. Koller is an independent consultant and former professor and dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University. His research interests include the toxicologic, pathologic, and immunologic effects of toxic substances and the effect of environmental contaminants on tumor growth and immunity. Dr. Koller is a former member of the NRC Committee on Toxicology and participated on several of its subcommittees, including the Subcommittee on Immunotoxicity and the Subcommittee on Zinc Cadmium Sulfide. He is currently serving on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Assessment of Wartime Exposure to Herbicides in Vietnam. Dr. Koller received his D.V.M. from Washington State University and his Ph.D. in pathology from the University of Wisconsin. His expertise is in toxicology. Brian Lamb, Boeing Distinguished Professor of Environmental Engineering, Washington State University, has been involved in atmospheric pollutant transport and dispersion studies for more than 20 years. His work on an automated vertical sampling system for sulfur hexafluoride that was deployed in a large Homeland Security urban dispersion study in Oklahoma City and his work on a real-time urban air quality forecast system for the Puget Sound region involved the development of detailed emission inventories and the evaluation of model performance using an array of available monitoring data. Mr. Lamb has expertise in modeling and measuring air plumes. Benjamin Y.H. Liu (NAE), Regents’ Professor Emeritus, University of Minnesota, is CEO and president of MSP Corporation. Dr. Liu directed the Particle Technology Laboratory at the University of Minnesota and conducted aerosol science research in a variety of disciplines and applications, including contamination control in microelectronics manufacturing, air pollution, gas cleaning, industrial hygiene, respiratory devices, and atmospheric sciences. He has authored or co-authored more than 300 publications, edited four books, and held 22 patents. He has extensive experience with the development of novel aerosol instrumentation and with studies of fine particle behavior. Douglas M. Medville retired from MITRE as program leader for chemical materiel disposal and remediation. He has led many analyses of risk, process engineering, transportation, and alternative disposal technologies and has briefed the public and senior military officials on the results. Mr. Medville led the evaluation of the operational performance of the Army’s chemical weapon disposal facility on Johnston Atoll and directed an assessment of the risks, public perceptions, environmental aspects, and logistics of transporting recovered non-stockpile chemical warfare materiel to candidate storage and disposal destinations. Before that, he worked at Franklin Institute Research Laboratories and General Electric. Mr. Medville earned a B.S. in industrial engineering and an M.S. in operations research, both from New York University. He has expertise in process and design engineering. Barbara Paldus, chief technology officer at Picarro, is responsible for technology strategy and research innovation. Her expertise is in cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and its application in diverse technology fields. Dr. Paldus has been issued 12 patents and written over 40 articles and conference papers on the application of CRDS and tunable lasers. In 2001, she was awarded the Aldolph Lomb Medal from the Optical Society of America. Previously, Dr. Paldus worked at Stanford on applications of MEMS to communication and display technologies. Dr. Paldus received her Ph.D. and her M.S.E.E. from Stanford University. She received her B.S. in electrical engineering and applied mathematics from the University of Waterloo, Canada. She has expertise in monitoring. George W. Parshall (NAS) is a consultant for E.I. DuPont de Nemours & Company, having retired from there in 1992

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Impact of Revised Airborne Exposure Limits on Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Program Activities after a career at the company spanning nearly 40 years. From 1979, he served as director of chemical science in Central Research and Development. Dr. Parshall is a past member of the NRC Board on Chemical Science and Technology and took part in earlier NRC chemical demilitarization studies. He continues to play an active role in National Research Council activities. He graduated from the University of Illinois with a Ph.D. in organic chemistry. He has experience in organic and inorganic chemistry and catalysis and in conducting and supervising chemical research. James P. Pastorick is president of Geophex UXO, Ltd., an unexploded ordnance (UXO) consulting firm based in Alexandria, Virginia, that specializes in UXO planning and management consulting to state and foreign governments. Since he retired from the U.S. Navy as an explosive ordnance disposal officer and diver in 1989, he has been working on civilian UXO clearance projects. Prior to starting his company, he was the senior project manager for UXO projects at UXB International, Inc., and the IT Group. He is a master-rated unexploded ordnance technician with over 18 years of experience in explosive ordnance disposal. Mr. Pastorick has been responsible for the management and supervision of numerous projects involving the investigation and remediation of sites contaminated with unexploded ordnance. He has expertise in explosives and ordnance handling; transport, disassembly, and disposal; and workforce protective ensembles. Charles F. Reinhardt, who has an M.D. from the Indiana University School of Medicine and an M.Sc. in occupational medicine from the Ohio State University School of Medicine, retired after more than 30 years with the DuPont Company’s Haskell Laboratory, where he was a physiologist, then chief of the physiology section, and then research manager for environmental sciences. In 1971 he became assistant director of the laboratory and in 1976 was named its director, a position he held until his retirement in 1996. Dr. Reinhardt has served on numerous National Research Council panels and committees, including the Committee on Toxicology. He has expertise in occupational medicine and toxicology. Gary D. Sides, senior scientist and director of government marketing for the Gas Technology Institute, Des Plaines, Illinois, has 25 years of experience in the development of automated and manual methods and the manufacture of automated monitoring systems to determine sarin (GB), VX, mustard, and other agents at the current worker protection levels and at the proposed CDC airborne exposure levels. Following the receipt of his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Florida in 1975, Dr. Sides conducted, and later directed, research, development, testing, and evaluation of automated and manual monitoring systems and accessories for the near-real-time detection of chemical warfare agents. His efforts in this area have included the design, development, and manufacture of ACAMS; the design, development, manufacture, and support of the MINICAMS; and the development of improved DAAMS methods. These three automated and manual methods form the basis of the Army’s agent monitoring technology currently used in the non-stockpile and stockpile programs. His work in air monitoring during the past 25 years has been conducted not only at CMS Research Corporation, which he founded and ran for 12 years, but also at Southern Research Institute, from which he retired in 2003. Dr. Sides has expertise in monitoring and instrumentation. Leonard M. Siegel is director of the Washington, D.C.-based Center for Public Environmental Oversight (CPEO), a project of the Tides Center that facilitates public participation in the oversight of military environmental programs, federal facilities cleanup, and brownfields revitalization. One of the environmental movement’s leading experts on military facility contamination, he serves on numerous advisory committees in that area, including the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council’s work teams on vapor intrusion and perchlorate, the Moffett Field (formerly the Moffett Naval Air Station) Restoration Advisory Board, the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council’s Federal Facilities Working Group, and the Outreach Advisory Committee of the Western Region Hazardous Substance Research Center. Mr. Siegel moderates and writes regularly for CPEO’s Military Environmental Forum listserv. He has expertise in public participation in environmental programs. Robert Snyder, associate dean of the School of Pharmacy at the Rutgers University College of Pharmacy, served as director of toxicology of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, Piscataway, New Jersey. He received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the State University of New York at Syracuse. Dr. Snyder’s research focuses on mechanisms for the toxic and carcinogenic effects of benzene, the role played by benzene metabolites, and mechanisms for the formation of these metabolites. Other scholarly interests include solvent toxicology, the mechanisms of hepatic toxicology, factors that control the dose-response relationship, and establishment of levels of exposure to chemicals that minimize the risks of toxicity. Dr. Snyder has expertise in toxicology and occupational health. Billy R. Thomas is vice president of the Consulting Division of Integrated Environmental Management, Inc., in Findlay, Ohio. He is board-certified in industrial hygiene and has served as the health and safety manager for both IT Corporation and OH Services, where he worked at the sites of spills or transportation emergencies where chemicals posed hazards to technicians. Mr. Thomas, who holds an M.S. degree in environmental health from the University of Oklahoma, has expertise in industrial hygiene in connection with the demolition of buildings, as well as a comprehensive back-

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Impact of Revised Airborne Exposure Limits on Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel Program Activities ground in protective clothing and the use of supplied air equipment. William J. Walsh is an attorney in the Washington, D.C., office of Pepper Hamilton LLP. Prior to joining Pepper, he was section chief in the EPA Office of Enforcement. His legal experience includes environmental regulatory advice and advocacy and defense of environmental injury litigation involving a broad spectrum of issues pursuant to a variety of environmental statutes, including the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). He represents trade associations, including the Rubber Manufacturers Association and the American Dental Association, in rule-making and other public policy advocacy. He has negotiated protective yet cost-effective remedies in pollution cases involving water, air, and hazardous waste and advised technology developers and users on taking advantage of the incentives for using innovative environmental technology and eliminating the regulatory barriers to its use. He previously served on NRC committees concerned with Superfund and RCRA corrective action programs and the use of appropriate scientific groundwater models in environmental regulatory programs and related activities. Mr. Walsh holds a J.D. from the George Washington University Law School and a B.S. in physics from Manhattan College. He has expertise in environmental and regulatory law.