G
Committee and Staff Biographies

KERRY A. EMANUEL (Co-chair) is a professor in the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate with the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Emanuel is interested in the dynamics and climate of the tropics, with a particular focus on moist convection and the various circulations that arise due to the interaction of the atmosphere and the ocean. His current research involves theoretical and modeling studies of air-sea interaction in tropical cyclones, coupled atmosphere-ocean models of hurricanes, the dynamics of cumulus convection and large-scale circulations, and the control of atmospheric water vapor by convection. Dr. Emanuel is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate; a former member of the NRC’s Committee on Meteorological Analysis, Prediction, and Radar Research; and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from MIT.

JOHN C. WYNGAARD (Co-chair) is a professor of meteorology, mechanical engineering, and geoenvironmental engineering at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Wyngaard studies turbulence in the atmosphere through direct observations and supercomputer simulation. He is interested in new observational approaches, including ground-based remote sensing, as well as measurements from towers and aircraft, and he studies the dynamic performance of turbulence sensors. Using the large-eddy simulation technique, he is developing new representations of turbulence effects in meteorological and oceanographic models of local to global scales. Dr. Wyngaard is a member of the National



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Improving the Scientific Foundation for Atmosphere-Land-Ocean Simulations: Report of A Workshop G Committee and Staff Biographies KERRY A. EMANUEL (Co-chair) is a professor in the Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate with the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dr. Emanuel is interested in the dynamics and climate of the tropics, with a particular focus on moist convection and the various circulations that arise due to the interaction of the atmosphere and the ocean. His current research involves theoretical and modeling studies of air-sea interaction in tropical cyclones, coupled atmosphere-ocean models of hurricanes, the dynamics of cumulus convection and large-scale circulations, and the control of atmospheric water vapor by convection. Dr. Emanuel is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate; a former member of the NRC’s Committee on Meteorological Analysis, Prediction, and Radar Research; and a fellow of the American Meteorological Society. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from MIT. JOHN C. WYNGAARD (Co-chair) is a professor of meteorology, mechanical engineering, and geoenvironmental engineering at Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Wyngaard studies turbulence in the atmosphere through direct observations and supercomputer simulation. He is interested in new observational approaches, including ground-based remote sensing, as well as measurements from towers and aircraft, and he studies the dynamic performance of turbulence sensors. Using the large-eddy simulation technique, he is developing new representations of turbulence effects in meteorological and oceanographic models of local to global scales. Dr. Wyngaard is a member of the National

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Improving the Scientific Foundation for Atmosphere-Land-Ocean Simulations: Report of A Workshop Research Council’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate and recently served on its Committee on the Atmospheric Dispersion of Hazardous Material Releases. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University. JAMES C. MCWILLIAMS is a professor of earth sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles, and a research scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. As a geophysical fluid dynamicist, he explores how material advection in a fluid produces the peculiar combination of global order and local chaos, and vice versa, evident in oceanic currents, as well as analogous phenomena in atmospheric and astrophysical flows. Some of his particular interests are coherent vortices in turbulence, interactions among surface waves and nearby winds and currents, general circulation of the ocean, Earth’s climate and its intrinsic variability, coastal physical-biogeochemical dynamics, and computational simulations of natural systems. Dr. McWilliams is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on several committees of the National Research Council, including the Committee on the Science of Climate Change. Dr. McWilliams received his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University. DAVID A. RANDALL has been a professor in the Department of Atmospheric Science at Colorado State University since 1988. Prior to that, he held positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Most of his research centers around further development and applications of a global atmospheric model, which is coupled with a land-surface model and an ocean model. His current research focus is on modeling studies of clouds and their role in the global climate system. Ongoing projects include development of improved cloud parameterization methods and an investigation of the role of clouds in climate dynamics. Dr. Randall is chief editor of the Journal of Climate. He received his Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles. YUK L. YUNG is a professor in the Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. He is interested in the chemistry, radiation, and transport in the terrestrial and planetary atmospheres and the application of global datasets to study climate change. His current research includes planets, high-precision remote sensing from space, isotopic atmospheric chemistry, and what influences and is influenced by the ozone layer. Dr. Yung is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and a member of Academia Sinica’s Advisory Panel, the American Astronomical Society (Division of Planetary Science), and the National Research Council’s Climate Research Committee. Dr. Yung has authored two books and more than 160 professional papers. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University.

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Improving the Scientific Foundation for Atmosphere-Land-Ocean Simulations: Report of A Workshop Staff JULIE DEMUTH is a program officer for the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She received her B.S. in meteorology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and her M.S. in atmospheric science from Colorado State University. Her master’s research focused on developing techniques for objectively estimating the intensity and wind structure of tropical cyclones in the Atlantic and East Pacific basins using microwave sounding data. The intensity estimation algorithm is now being run operationally by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Hurricane Center during the tropical season. Since joining BASC in March 2003, Ms. Demuth has worked on studies involving atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials, weather modification, and road weather research, and the use of NEXRADs sited in complex terrain for flash flood forecasting. DIANE GUSTAFSON is an Administrative Coordinator in the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Since joining BASC in 1998, she has worked on studies involving climate change, the transition from research to operations, climate services, communicating uncertainties in weather and climate, and the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous material releases. Ms. Gustafson received her B.S. in biology from Marymount University.