Appendix H
Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Fitzhugh Mullan, M.D. (Chair), is a contributing editor of the journal Health Affairs and a clinical professor of pediatrics and public health at the George Washington University. He is a member of the medical staff at the Upper Cardozo Community Health Center in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mullan graduated from Harvard University and from the University of Chicago Medical School. In 1972 he was commissioned in the U.S. Public Health Service and went to work as one of the first physicians in the National Health Service Corps. From 1977 through 1981 he served as director of the program followed by tours as a senior medical officer at the National Institutes of Health and, in 1984–1985, as the Secretary of Health and Environment for the state of New Mexico. He was appointed director of the Bureau of Health Professions in 1990 and to the rank of Assistant Surgeon General (Rear Admiral) in 1991. In subsequent years, he served on both the President’s Task Force on Health Care Reform and the Council on Graduate Medical Education. Dr. Mullan retired from the Public Health Service in 1996. Dr. Mullan has written widely for professional and general audiences, including his books Plagues and Politics: The Story of the United States Public Health Service, and Big Doctoring in America: Profiles in Primary Care. Dr. Mullan is the Founding President of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. He serves as Vice-Chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Health Museum.


Michele Barry, M.D., F.A.C.P., is a Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health at Yale University where she is the Director of Yale’s Office



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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS Appendix H Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS Fitzhugh Mullan, M.D. (Chair), is a contributing editor of the journal Health Affairs and a clinical professor of pediatrics and public health at the George Washington University. He is a member of the medical staff at the Upper Cardozo Community Health Center in Washington, D.C. Dr. Mullan graduated from Harvard University and from the University of Chicago Medical School. In 1972 he was commissioned in the U.S. Public Health Service and went to work as one of the first physicians in the National Health Service Corps. From 1977 through 1981 he served as director of the program followed by tours as a senior medical officer at the National Institutes of Health and, in 1984–1985, as the Secretary of Health and Environment for the state of New Mexico. He was appointed director of the Bureau of Health Professions in 1990 and to the rank of Assistant Surgeon General (Rear Admiral) in 1991. In subsequent years, he served on both the President’s Task Force on Health Care Reform and the Council on Graduate Medical Education. Dr. Mullan retired from the Public Health Service in 1996. Dr. Mullan has written widely for professional and general audiences, including his books Plagues and Politics: The Story of the United States Public Health Service, and Big Doctoring in America: Profiles in Primary Care. Dr. Mullan is the Founding President of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship. He serves as Vice-Chair of the Board of Trustees of the National Health Museum. Michele Barry, M.D., F.A.C.P., is a Professor of Medicine and Global Public Health at Yale University where she is the Director of Yale’s Office

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS of International Health. She also serves as the health consultant for the Ford Foundation overseas programs. As codirector for more than 20 years of Yale/Johnson and Johnson Physician Scholar Award program she has sent more than 800 physicians overseas to underserved areas. As a past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, she led an educational initiative in tropical medicine and travelers health which culminated in diploma courses in tropical medicine both in the United States and overseas, as well as a U.S. certification exam. She has written extensively in the areas of clinical tropical diseases, refugee health, and ethical dilemmas of overseas research. Dr. Barry has lived overseas on projects in Ecuador, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Haiti, and South Africa. Jane Carter, M.B.B.S., F.R.C.P.(C.), is Head of the Clinical Services Program for the African Medical and Research Foundation, located in Nairobi, Kenya. As Head of the Laboratory Program, Dr. Carter pilots her own single-engine Cessna and flies to 80 remote villages in East Africa to help establish outreach services or set up a lab. Dr. Carter, one of the foundation’s “Flying Doctors,” has a medical practice that covers more than 1.5 million square kilometers. In addition to her establishing outreach services, Dr. Carter is responsible for developing and supervising clinical and laboratory diagnostic services. She also coordinates with African ministries of health and other health care agencies to develop training methods and learning materials, and does operational research into diagnostic systems development and diagnostic methodologies. Born in Calcutta, Dr. Carter spent her early childhood in developing countries such as Pakistan and Sri Lanka and later attended boarding school in England. She later earned a medical degree at the Royal Free Hospital in London. Dr. Carter did her residency training in general internal medicine at the University of Toronto, where she later specialized in clinical hematology. Lincoln Chen, M.D., M.P.H., is the Director of the Global Equity Center at Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Previously he has served as the Executive Vice President for Strategy at the Rockefeller Foundation, and as a member of the Board of Trustees Committee on Future Strategies chairs or directs programs in global philanthropy, such as the Program Venture Experiment and the Bellagio Committee. Prior to joining the Rockefeller Foundation, Dr. Chen was the Director of the University-wide Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies and the Taro Takemi Professor of International Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. From 1981–1987, Dr. Chen was the Representative of the Ford Foundation in India, and in 1973–1980, he worked for the Ford Foundation both on its staff and seconded as Scientific Director of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research in Bangladesh. Dr. Chen has more than 100

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS publications on world social development, especially in health, population, and food and nutrition. Gary Gunderson, M.Div, D.Min, is Director of the Interfaith Health Program (IHP) of the Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University. Dr. Gunderson is the author of Deeply Woven Roots (Fortress, 1997), exploring the strengths of religious congregations as agents in building healthy communities, and Playing to Our Strengths (Carter Center, 1997), examining the opportunities and challenges in the realignment of religious health assets such as hospitals and the new foundations. He has also published many articles and speeches. He is the program chair for the American Public Health Association caucus on Faith Community and Public Health, consultant to the United Methodist Bishop’s Initiative on Children and Poverty, member of the Board of Directors of Heifer Project International and the Atlanta Committee for UNICEF, and co-chair of Oakhurst Baptist Building Fund. Gunderson is an ordained American Baptist minister educated at Wake Forest University (history), Emory University (M.Div.) and Interdenominational Theological Center (D.Min.). Gunderson was the founder and editor of Seeds magazine, which won international recognition for excellence in coverage of hunger and international development. He led a private company, USAfrica, for 5 years, establishing joint venture projects and consulting with governments in Africa. He has served as Honorary Consul for the country of Burkina Faso, West Africa, since 1988. Barry Kistnasamy, M.B.Ch.B., M.Med., is a specialist in Community Health with further training in Health Economics and Planning (York, UK) and Environmental and Occupational Health (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor). He is currently the program manager for HIV/AIDS in the Department of Community Health at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine in Durban, South Africa. Before becoming the program manager for HIV/ AIDS, he served as Dean of Medicine of the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, as Deputy Director General of Health, Welfare and Environment in the Northern Cape, and as advisor to the Minister of Health in KwaZulu-Natal. He received an M.B.Ch.B. and an M.Med. (Community Health) from the University of Natal. He has also studied Health Economics and Planning in York (UK), Occupational and Environmental Health in Michigan, and Health Leadership in Cambridge (UK). Dr. Kistnasamy contributed to health policy development in South Africa (Occupational Health, Health Financing and Human Resources) and has been involved with Health System transformation over the last 20 years. He also serves in various nongovernmental organizations and professional and academic bodies in South Africa.

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS Ronaldo Lima, M.Sc., is Senior Director of Information Technology for the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative. A native of Brazil, Mr. Lima has a Bachelor of Science in electronic engineering and a master’s degree in computer networks from Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Besides engineering, he has also been involved in AIDS advocacy since 1991 as president of an AIDS community-based organization named Grupo Pela Vidda, in Rio de Janeiro. In 1999, Mr. Lima was invited to work for the Brazilian National AIDS Program in Brasilia as the head of the Information Technology Department where he employed his different experiences in information technology as well as in the AIDS field. In this position he led 23 technical consultants in advancing the implementation of three nationwide information systems. He has also been involved particularly with AIDS vaccine advocacy during the last 3 years, being one of the community representatives in the Brazilian National AIDS Vaccine Committee. In 2000, Mr. Lima moved to the United States to work as an information technology consultant for an American company located in California. In September 2001, Mr. Lima moved to New York to join IAVI and, once more, is bringing together his backgrounds in information technology, management, and vaccine advocacy. Leslie Mancuso, Ph.D., R.N., is CEO of JHPIEGO, where she provides strategic direction and coordination of JHPIEGO’s major programs and awards, directs the corporate management of program, technical, and administrative operations, and manages and guides JHPIEGO’s business development activities. Prior to serving as CEO, Dr. Mancuso was Acting Chief Executive Officer and Chief Operating Officer, and later served as a Vice President for Project HOPE, a $100 million not-for-profit organization active in the training of health care professionals and the provision of medicines and medical supplies in more than 30 low-income countries worldwide. The international health community recognizes Dr. Mancuso as a leader in the field because of her pioneering work in neonatal and pediatric care. Under her leadership, Dr. Mancuso provides her staff of 400 with a vision for how JHPIEGO can maximize both public and private sector resources to create sustainable health networks throughout the world. JHPIEGO works with many international organizations, including HealthNet International, UNICEF, the World Health Organization (WHO), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). MG (Retired) William L. Moore, Jr., M.D., served as Chief Medical Executive, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Clinical Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Moore is

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS a nationally known infectious diseases physician-epidemiologist who has authored/co-authored more than 40 scientific articles in peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Moore retired from the U.S. Army at the rank of Major General. His assignments included Vice Commander, Headquarters, Joint Military Medical Command; Commander, Brooke Army Medical Center; and Commander, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School. As Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, Dr. Moore oversaw DoD-wide programs for training combat medics and other professional extenders for work in low resource settings. Early in his career he trained Special Forces medics and also directed Army AIDS programs. Prior to his position with the Department of Veterans Affairs, he was State Epidemiologist and Director of Communicable and Environmental Disease Services Section of the Tennessee Department of Health. His primary areas of expertise include infectious diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, epidemiology, military medicine, and public health. Dr. Moore is board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases, and a fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Dr. Moore has served as a member on many local, state, and national panels and committees. Dr. Moore’s extensive background in military medicine and his diverse expertise in infectious diseases, hospital administration, epidemiology, and public health contribute greatly to the Board’s ability to provide recommendations to DoD on a variety of important health issues. Andre-Jacques Neusy, M.D., DTM&H, is the founder and director of the Center for Global Health at NYU School of Medicine, dedicated to shaping new interdisciplinary education and capacity development strategies for health and health-allied professionals. Dr. Neusy was raised in CongoZaire where he completed his premedical education. He obtained his medical degree and a certificate in Tropical Medicine and Hygiene at the Free University of Brussels School of Medicine. He joined the faculty of New York University’s School of Medicine in 1975. Dr. Neusy returned numerous times to Africa to serve as health coordinator in development and disaster settings. In 1994, he led the health team of the International Rescue Committee (IRC), responding to the humanitarian crisis in the aftermath of the genocide in Rwanda. A technical advisor to its Health Unit, Dr. Neusy has worked for IRC, a $148 million not-for-profit organization involved in emergency relief and rehabilitation in 25 countries, in Eastern Zaire, Macedonia, and Kosovo. Committed to strengthening global human resources for health, Dr. Neusy serves as advisor to the Ministry of Health and the National University of Rwanda. President of the International Health Medical Education Consortium, he has lectured on disaster management and global health-related issues at various institutions.

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS Lieutenant General James B. Peake, MC, USA, is a graduate of the military academy at West Point and has held a wide variety of important positions in the U.S. Army, culminating in his appointment September 22, 2000, as Army Surgeon General and Commander of the U.S. Army Medical Command, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Previous key assignments include: Commander, U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School, and Installation Commander, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Deputy Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Commanding General, Madigan Army Medical Center/Northwest Health Service Support Activity, Tacoma, Washington; Commanding General, 44th Medical Brigade/Corps Surgeon, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Deputy Director, Professional Services/Chief, Consultant, Office of the Surgeon General, Falls Church, Virgnia; Commander, 18th Medical Command and 121st Evacuation Hospital/Command Surgeon, Seoul, Korea; Deputy Commander for Clinical Services, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Assistant Chief, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas; Staff General Surgeon/Chief, General Surgery Clinic, DeWitt Army Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia; and General Surgery Resident, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Christina Polyak, M.P.H., is currently a medical student at the University of Maryland. Ms. Polyak previously operated as an epidemiologist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense’s Global Emerging Infections System at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. Her work has included extended field assignments in Kenya and Malawi. She has published and presented extensively in the field of epidemiology and is a member of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, the International Society of Travel Medicine, and the American Medical Student Association. Ms. Polyak received her Bachelor of Science and Master’s in Public Health at Johns Hopkins University. Marla Salmon, ScD., R.N., currently serves as Professor and Dean, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing and Professor at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University. Prior to joining Emory, Dr. Salmon served as professor and graduate dean of the School of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, where she was responsible for both master’s and doctoral nursing programs. Prior to her role at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Salmon served as director of the Division of Nursing for the United States Department of Health and Human Services; Professor and Chair of Public Health Nursing in the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina; and Head of the Public Health Nursing Program at the University of Minnesota. Her areas of teaching and research include

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS health policy and administration, public health nursing, and health workforce development. Dr. Salmon is the author of numerous publications in these areas. Dr. Salmon has worked with a number of international organizations, including the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization and the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. In addition, Dr. Salmon has consulted with governments and organizations outside of the United States and served as a member of the U.S. Delegation to the World Health Assembly. Dr. Salmon is the former Chair of the World Health Organization’s Global Advisory Group on Nursing and Midwifery. Dr. Salmon received her doctoral degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health, holds degrees in nursing and political science from the University of Portland and is the recipient of two honorary degrees. Dr. Salmon has also been a Fellow in the W. K. Kellogg National Fellowship Program and the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs. Robert Schooley, M.D., is Professor and Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of California, San Diego. He has served as Chair of the NIH’s AIDS and Related Retrovirus 1 Study Section and as Chair of the Executive Committee of the NIAID’s AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). He currently serves as International Program Liaison for the ACTG. Dr. Schooley is a Member of the AIDS Treatment Guidelines Panels of the Department of Health and Human Services and of the International AIDS Society–USA. He is also a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; American Society for Clinical Investigation; American Society for Microbiology; Clinical Immunology Society; and Association of American Physicians and is a Fellow of the Infectious Disease Society. His research interests are in the areas of viral pathogenesis and therapy. Harrison Spencer, M.D., M.P.H., is President and CEO of the Association of Schools of Public Health. Before that, he was Dean of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has also served as Dean of Tulane School of Public Health and Chief of the parasitic disease branch at the CDC. Dr. Spencer received his bachelor’s degree from Haverford College and his medical degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He holds a M.P.H. in epidemiology from Berkeley, as well as a diploma in tropical medicine and hygiene from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (DTM&H). He is a member of many expert committees of the World Health Organization and many professional societies. Dr. Spencer is the author of numerous publications on topics ranging from malaria, filariasis, and schistosomiasis to the use of community health care workers in the control of disease.

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS CONSULTANTS Thomas Denny, M.Sc., is an Associate Professor of Pathology, Laboratory Medicine and Pediatrics and Director of the Center for Laboratory Investigation at the New Jersey Medical School. Mr. Denny is the principal investigator of a $6.2 million grant from NIAID to develop the AIDS Immunology Quality Assessment Program. The program will be responsible for monitoring performance and developing new immunologic laboratory assays for 85 to 100 NIH-supported AIDS laboratories throughout the United States. He has more than 20 years of cellular immunology experience related to studying host defense mechanisms in response to tumors and/or infectious diseases. He has served on numerous committees for the NIH-NIAID Division of AIDS over the last two decades as part of the HIV clinical trials program. In 1997, he received a NIH HIV Innovative Vaccine Grant award to study a new method of vaccine delivery. He holds an M.Sc. in molecular and biomedical immunology from the University of East London and completed a course of study in strategic management at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania in 1991. He has completed the Program for Advanced Training in Biomedical Research Management at Harvard School of Public Health. Mr. Denny has authored and coauthored more than 70 peer-reviewed papers. In 1991, Mr. Denny helped establish a small laboratory in the Republic of Kalmykia (former Soviet Union) to improve the care of children with HIV/AIDS. In the aftermath of September 11, Mr. Denny established a medical school study to comprehensively assess immunologic memory/responses in those (individuals more than 30 years old) who had previously received smallpox vaccinations. He has recently been called upon to help support NIH biodefense vaccine trials. Mr. Denny’s policy interests include vaccine development, regulatory issues, clinical trials, women and infant HIV/AIDS, accessibility to care, and global public health. Mr. Denny previously served as a Robert Wood Johnson Policy Fellow with the National Academies. Bjorg Palsdottir, M.P.A., is the Cofounder and Associate Director of the Center for Global Health at New York University School of Medicine, dedicated to shaping new interdisciplinary education and capacity development strategies for health and health-allied professionals. Prior to working for the Center Ms. Palsdottir worked for the International Rescue Committee a relief and development organization, first at their headquarters in New York, then as a regional information coordinator for East and Central Africa covering programs in Sudan, Somalia, Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Her consultancy work has included the development of a management training program taught in Uganda and an evaluation of the American International Health Alliance’s

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS emergency medical training programs in Ukraine, Russia, and Uzbekistan. Prior to her working for humanitarian organizations, she worked as a journalist for The Economist Intelligence Unit in New York as well as for the Palestine-Israel Journal in Jerusalem. Ms. Palsdottir has also studied and worked in France, Germany, Denmark, Norway, Switzerland, and her home country of Iceland. She holds a B.A. in economic journalism, and a master’s in Public Administration and a certificate in Management Training and Organizational Development from New York University; she is also a graduate of the Coaches Training Institute in San Rafael, California. Claire Panosian, M.D., D.T.M.H. (London) (Senior Consultant/Writer), is a Professor of Medicine/Infectious Diseases at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, a tropical medicine and infectious diseases clinician, and a medical journalist. She joined the UCLA faculty after attending Stanford University and Northwestern University School of Medicine and completing her postgraduate medical training at Northwestern Medical Center, Tufts–New England Medical Center, and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Over the past 20 years, she has frequently worked overseas as a medical educator and has pioneered several global health curricula in the UCLA School of Medicine, UCLA College of Letters and Science, and UCLA Graduate School of Education. Her second career as a journalist includes 6 years as a medical writer, reporter, and coanchor for national medical television; she has also authored many articles and columns for Scientific American, Discover magazine, and the Los Angeles Times. Dr. Panosian is currently a Councilor of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene and a senior consultant/writer for the Institute of Medicine Board on Global Health where she previously coedited Saving Lives, Buying Time: Economics of Malaria Drugs in an Age of Resistance (The National Academies Press, 2004). Her other medical publications include original research articles as well as chapters, reviews and editorials on parasitic infections, diarrhea, tuberculosis, malaria, and immunization. Kai Spratt, R.N., M.P.H., Ph.D., has more than 17 years of experience in the health care field. For the last 12 years she has been associated with Johns Hopkins University in a wide range of professional areas including: research, research design, strategic planning, monitoring, and evaluation, and project management. Dr. Spratt’s HIV/AIDS expertise dates back to 1996 with her involvement on a HIVNET multidisciplinary team conducting HIV/AIDS epidemiological and behavioral surveillance and research in Pune, India, including Phase I trials assessing the efficacy of counseling methods and a vaginal microbicide. As a professional behavioral scientist, Dr. Spratt has made significant contributions to the design of HIV/AIDS

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS and related projects in many countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Seconded to the U.S. Agency for International Development from 1999–2001, Dr. Spratt served as the HIV/AIDS Technical Advisor to the Asia and Near East Bureau. In this capacity, Dr. Spratt conducted technical analyses; designed and developed strategic approaches to addressing HIV/AIDS; provided technical and programmatic guidance; developed monitoring and evaluation frameworks; and fostered key relationships for the Agency with government entities (both domestic and foreign), organizations working in the field of HIV/AIDS, and the international donor community. Dr. Spratt joined JHPIEGO in June 2001 as the Director of the Research and Evaluation Office and Senior HIV/AIDS Advisor. In January 2003 the Office of HIV/AIDS was opened under Dr. Spratt’s direction, becoming the Center for Excellence in HIV/AIDS in July 2004; the Center provides technical assistance to JHPIEGO country programs and assures that best practices are disseminated throughout JHPIEGO programs. Dr. Spratt has technical expertise in the area of VCT, PMTCT, care and support, and monitoring and evaluation. Richard Guerrant, M.D. (Liaison to the Board on Global Health), is the Thomas H. Hunter Professor of International Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health and Director of the Trans-University Center for Global Health at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. He received his M.D. at the University of Virginia with additional training in medicine and infectious diseases at Boston City Hospital, NIH, Johns Hopkins, and UVA. Dr. Guerrant has worked in the Congo, Bangladesh, and in a longstanding collaboration in Northeast Brazil and is past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine. His primary areas of research include recognition, diagnosis, pathogenesis, and control of enteric infections; and in mentoring colleagues who return to develop Trans-University Centers for Global Health in Brazil, Ghana, Philippines, and South Africa. With colleagues in Brazil, Dr. Guerrant’s research documents the effects of and potential solutions for diarrhea and enteric parasitic infections on the long-term physical and cognitive development in malnourished children and on anti-HIV drug absorption and resistance in patients with AIDS. Dr. Guerrant is the author of over 400 scientific and clinical articles and reviews. He also edits At the Edge of Development: Health Crises in a Transitional Society, and textbooks on Infections in the GI Tract and the two-volume textbook Tropical Infectious Diseases: Principles, Pathogens and Practice.

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS IOM STAFF Patrick W. Kelley, M.D., Dr.P.H., joined the Institute of Medicine in July 2003 serving as the Director of the Board on Global Health and the Board on African Academy Science Development. Previously he served in the U.S. Army for more than 23 years as a physician, residency director, epidemiologist, and program manager. In his last DoD position, Dr. Kelley founded and directed the presidentially mandated DoD Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). This responsibility entailed managing approximately $42 million dollars of emerging infections surveillance, response, training, and capacity-building activities undertaken in partnership numerous elements of the federal government and with health ministries in over 45 developing countries. He also designed and established the DoD Accessions Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity, the first systematic DoD effort to apply epidemiology to the evidence-based development and evaluation of physical and psychological accession standards. Dr. Kelley is an experienced communicator having lectured in over 20 countries and authored over 50 scholarly papers and book chapters. He also designed and served as the specialty editor for the two-volume textbook Military Preventive Medicine: Mobilization and Deployment. Dr. Kelley obtained his M.D. from the University of Virginia and his Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. Patricia Cuff, M.S., R.D., M.P.H., is currently the Study Director for the Committee on the Options for Overseas Placement of US Health Professionals. She was most recently a Study Director with the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. Ms. Cuff joined the Institute of Medicine staff in April, 2001, to work on the report, Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century with the Board on Global Health. Prior to that, she worked extensively in the field of HIV-nutrition as a counselor, researcher, and lecturer on topics of adult and pediatric HIV. She received an M.S. in nutrition and an M.P.H. in Population and Family Health from Columbia University in 1995, and performed her undergraduate studies at the University of Connecticut. Alyson Schwaber joined the Institute of Medicine in November 2004 as a research associate for the Committee on the Options for Overseas Placement of U.S. Health Professionals. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Schwaber was a program manager for sustainable development focused on Africa at Sister Cities International in Washington, D.C. She served as a Peace Corps community health volunteer in Mauritania from 1999–2001. Following her service, she remained in Mauritania for two additional years to work with an international NGO on their newly created

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Healers Abroad: Americans Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS project. Ms. Schwaber completed her undergraduate studies at Penn State University and is currently pursuing a Master of Public Health degree at Johns Hopkins University. Dianne Stare is a Research Assistant for the Board on Global Health. Ms. Stare began her tenure with the National Academies in 2001 as a Project Assistant with the Board on Radiation Effects Research in the Division of Earth and Life Studies. There she worked on studies relating to compensation claims of radiation-exposed veterans, evaluating radioactive fallout exposure to the U.S. population, and several CDC studies related to the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Ms. Stare joined the Board on Global Health in 2003 and is currently involved with the Committee on the Options for Overseas Placement of US Health Professionals and the InterAcademy Medical Panel Secretariat. Prior to joining the Academies, Ms. Stare managed a clinical drug study in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and coordinated laboratory research for the Penn State Cancer Center. Ms. Stare received her B.S. in Biology from Syracuse University. Allison L. Berger is a Senior Program Assistant for the Board on Global Health. She currently provides meeting and travel assistance on an Institute of Medicine fast-track study “Committee on the Options for Overseas Placement of U.S. Health Professionals.” Ms. Berger previously served as a Project Assistant for the IOM’s Medical Follow-up Agency, and the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health where she worked on other IOM studies: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss and Tinnitus in the Military; Health Literacy: A Prescription to End Confusion; and Introducing Behavioral and Social Science into Medical School Curricula. Before joining the IOM staff, she served a 5-year tenure as an Administrative Assistant for the American Psychological Association where she assisted the APA Committee on Psychological Test and Assessment, Committee on Scientific Awards, and the Committee on Animal Research and Ethics. She also worked on several funding and grant programs sponsored by the APA Science Directorate.