Appendixes



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Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward Appendixes

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Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward A Committee Biographical Information Robert W. Fri (Chair) is a visiting scholar and senior fellow emeritus at Resources for the Future, where he served as president from 1986 to 1995. From 1996 to 2001 he served as director of the National Museum of Natural History at the Smithsonian Institution. Before joining the Smithsonian, Fri served in both the public and private sectors, specializing in energy and environmental issues. In 1971 he became the first deputy administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 1975, President Ford appointed him as the deputy administrator of the Energy Research and Development Administration. He served as acting administrator of both agencies for extended periods. From 1978 to 1986, Fri headed his own company, Energy Transition Corporation. He began his career with McKinsey and Company, where he was elected a principal. Fri is a senior advisor to private, public, and nonprofit organizations. He is a director of the American Electric Power Company and of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a trustee of Science Service, Inc. (publisher of Science News and organizer of the Intel Science Talent Search and International Science and Engineering Fair). He is a member of the National Petroleum Council and a member of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee at the Department of Energy (DOE). In past years, he has been a member of the President’s Commission on Environmental Quality, the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board, and the University of Chicago Board of Governors for Argonne National Laboratory. He has chaired advisory committees of the National Research Council (NRC); the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology and Government; EPRI; and the Office of Technology Assessment. He served as chair of the NRC Committee on Benefits of DOE R&D on Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy. From 1978 to 1995 he was a director of Transco Energy Company, where he served as chair of the audit, compensation, and chief executive search committees. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi and a national associate of the National Academies. He received his B.A. in physics from Rice University and his M.B.A. (with distinction) from Harvard University. Linda R. Cohen is professor of economics, Department of Economics, University of California, Irvine, and professor of social science and law, The Law School, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. She was previously chair, Department of Economics, University of California, Irvine, where she has taught in various capacities with increasing responsibility since 1987. Previously, Dr. Cohen was an economist associate at the Rand Corporation, a research associate for economics with the Brookings Institution, a senior economist with the California Institute of Technology’s Environmental Quality Laboratory, and an assistant professor of public policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. She was the Olin Visiting Professor in Law and Economics at the University of Southern California Law School in 1993 and 1998, a fellow of the California Council for Science and Technology in 1998, and a research fellow at the Brookings Institution in 1977. Dr. Cohen has written many articles and coauthored a book on federal research and technology policy. She is currently a member of the editorial board of Public Choice and a member of the California Energy Commission’s Advisory Panel for the Public Interest Energy Research Program. She has served on a variety of panels and committees and was a member of the NRC Committee on Benefits of DOE’s R&D on Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy. She has an A.B. degree in mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley and received her Ph.D. in social sciences from the California Institute of Technology. James Corman is an independent consultant and founder of Energy Alternatives Systems, an engineering consulting company. He retired as general manager of the Advanced Technology Department of General Electric’s (GE’s) Power Generation Business, where he was responsible for develop-

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Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward ment of the next generation of power systems and technical interactions with GE’s international business associates. Dr. Corman was previously manager of the Advanced Projects Laboratory of GE Corporate Research and Development; there he led a diverse R&D program in activities ranging from basic technology to pilot-plant demonstration. Dr. Corman is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He was a member of several NRC committees. He is chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for Mechanical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University. He has a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University. Paul A. DeCotis is director of the Energy Analysis Program responsible for statewide energy policy analysis, planning, and evaluation at the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Mr. DeCotis directs statewide energy planning, energy policy and legislative analysis, corporate strategic planning, energy program and R&D program evaluation, and energy emergency planning. He oversees statewide energy demand and price forecasting for all fuels; economic, electricity and natural gas system, and environmental modeling; and energy markets assessments. He is the record access officer to the State Energy Planning Board and chair of the Interagency Energy Coordinating Working Group, comprising the Departments of Public Service, Environmental Conservation, Transportation, and Economic Development. He is also a member of the New York Independent System Operator Management Committee. Prior to joining NYSERDA in 1995, Mr. DeCotis was chief of policy analysis at the New York State Energy Office. He previously served as a staff economist, financial analyst, and policy analyst. Mr. DeCotis also is president of Innovative Management Solutions, a management consulting business specializing in strategic planning, executive management development, and mediation. Mr. DeCotis is an adjunct professor at the Sage Graduate School in the master of business administration program and previously was an adjunct professor at Cornell University in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations. His broad experiences include holding elected office as a member of the Ballston Spa Central School District Board of Education, serving as chair and chief fiscal officer, and also as chair of the Saratoga County School Boards Association. He is currently a board member and executive vice president of the Association of Energy Service Professionals International. Mr. DeCotis holds a B.S. in international business management from the State University College at Brockport; an M.A. in economics from the State University of New York at Albany, and an M.B.A. in finance and management studies from Russell Sage College. Wesley L. Harris (NAE) is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His expertise is in fluid mechanics; aerodynamics; unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics; acoustics; lean manufacturing processes; and military logistics and sustainment. Dr. Harris’s background also includes managing major national and international aeronautical and aviation programs and personnel in the executive branch of the federal government. Prior to coming to MIT, he served as associate administrator for aeronautics at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. Martha A. Krebs is president of Science Strategies, a consulting firm. She was founding director of the California NanoSystems Institute at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of California at Santa Barbara. Previously, she was a senior fellow at the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA), where she led studies in R&D management, planning, and budgeting. She has extensive experience regarding DOE’s basic and applied energy programs. Dr. Krebs also served as DOE assistant secretary and director, Office of Science, responsible for the $3 billion basic research programs that underlie the DOE’s energy, environmental, and national security missions. She also had the statutory responsibility for advising the Secretary of Energy on the broad R&D portfolio of the department and the institutional health of its national laboratories. She has been associate director for planning and development, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, where she was responsible for strategic planning for research and facilities, laboratory technology transfer, and science education and outreach. She also served on the House Committee on Science, first as a professional staff member and then as subcommittee staff director, responsible for authorizing DOE non-nuclear energy technologies and energy science programs. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a fellow of the Association of Women in Science, and she received the Secretary of Energy’s Gold Medal for Distinguished Service (1999). She is a member of NRC’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and its Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. She received her bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. in physics from the Catholic University of America. George W. Norton is professor of agricultural and applied economics at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. He teaches courses on international agricultural development and trade. His research program has a significant interdisciplinary component and focuses on international agricultural development, agricultural research evaluation, and integrated pest management. Current projects include the development of methods for evaluating impacts of agri-

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Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward cultural biotechnologies, for assessing the economic benefits of integrated pest management programs, and for setting agricultural research priorities. Dr. Norton serves as chair of the Technical Committee of the Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research Support Program (IPM CRSP), a multi-institutional international IPM project. He was a visiting professor at Cornell University (1987-1988), and at the Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (1999-2000). He received a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1979. Rosalie Ruegg is consultant and managing director, Technology Impact Assessment (TIA) Consulting, Inc., a small, woman-owned company that provides evaluation of R&D and technology programs at the federal, state, and international levels. Prior to founding TIA Consulting, Ms. Ruegg was director of the Economic Assessment Office of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Advanced Technology Program. In this capacity, she developed and implemented a comprehensive evaluation program. She also led and served on boards responsible for assessing industry-led projects for more than $1 billion of federal awards and convened panels of industry executives, business specialists, and senior economists to provide advice to the federal government on the business and economic merit of industry proposals. Other positions that she has held are senior economist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST’s) Center for Applied Mathematics, where she led an award-winning, multisector impact study for Congress; industry economist at NIST; college instructor in economics; short-course developer; and financial economist for the Federal Reserve Board of Governors. Ms. Ruegg has more than 30 years’ experience in program and project evaluation, including economic impact assessment of advanced technologies. She specializes in the development, refinement, and application of evaluation methodologies to estimate the private and social benefits of investments in research and development and technological innovation. She plans and conducts impact studies of programs and projects, develops innovative evaluation methodologies and strategies, serves on advisory and editorial boards, advises clients on their evaluation requirements, reviews studies for clients, organizes and presents workshops and conferences on best practices in the field, and frequently speaks at public events on measuring and reporting benefits and costs of public and private investments in R&D. She has a B.S. in economics with honors from the University of North Carolina, an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland, and an M.B.A. in finance from American University. A Woodrow Wilson Fellow and member of Phi Beta Kappa, Ms. Ruegg is recipient of the Department of Commerce’s Gold and Silver Medal Awards and the 2001 Wellington Award, a former member of the Federal Senior Executive Service, and recipient of the American Evaluation Association’s 2004 award for Best Publication in the Field of Evaluation. Maxine L. Savitz (NAE) is retired general manager of Technology Partnerships, Honeywell, Inc. She has managed large R&D programs in the federal government and in the private sector. Some of the positions that she has held include the following: chief, Buildings Conservation Policy Research, Federal Energy Administration; professional manager, Research Applied to National Needs, National Science Foundation; division director, Buildings and Industrial Conservation, Energy Research and Development Administration; deputy assistant secretary for conservation, U.S. Department of Energy; president, Lighting Research Institute; and general manager, Ceramic Components, AlliedSignal Inc. (now Honeywell). Dr. Savitz has extensive technical experience in the areas of materials, fuel cells, batteries and other storage devices, energy efficiency, and R&D management. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. She has been, or is serving as, a member of numerous public- and private-sector boards and has served on many energy-related and other NRC committees. She has a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Jack S. Siegel is a principal with the consulting firm of Energy Resources International, Inc., and president of its Technology and Markets Group. While at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), he held various positions of leadership, including deputy assistant secretary for coal technology and acting assistant secretary for fossil energy. Prior to serving at DOE, he was at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and led efforts to regulate and enforce the Clean Air Act of 1970. Mr. Siegel has broad and extensive experience on energy and environmental issues and has recently been involved in studies on markets and barriers to clean coal technologies, conventional and advanced turbines, renewable energy systems, distributed power systems, the impact of electric power restructuring on fuel and technology choices in the energy sector, options for reductions of greenhouse gases, and energy and environmental analysis in support of a number of foreign countries, the World Bank, and the Global Environment Facility. He served as a member of the NRC’s Committee on Challenges, Opportunities, and Possibilities for Cooperation in the Energy Futures of China and the United States and was a member of the previous Committee on Benefits of DOE R&D on Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy. He received the Presidential Award for Superior Achievement (1992) and the Secretary of Energy’s Gold Medal for Outstanding Performance (1994). He has a B.S. in chemical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. James E. Smith is an associate professor of decision sciences at Duke University. He teaches courses in probability and statistics and decision modeling. Professor Smith’s research interests lie primarily in the areas of decision analysis and real options. More specifically, his research focuses on developing methods for formulating and solving dynamic decision problems and valuing risky investments, taking ac-

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Prospective Evaluation of Applied Energy Research and Development at DOE (Phase One): A First Look Forward count of the information provided in futures and options markets. His research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and Chevron Corporation. Professor Smith received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University (in 1984 and 1986, respectively) and worked as a management consultant prior to earning his Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems at Stanford in 1990. He has been at the Fuqua School of Business since the fall of 1990, and he received the Outstanding Faculty Award from the daytime M.B.A. students in 1993 and 2000; he has been nominated for teaching awards on several other occasions. He spent the 1998-1999 academic year on sabbatical at Stanford and served as associate dean for the Daytime M.B.A. Program at the Fuqua School of Business from 2000 to 2003. Terry Surles is currently vice president for the Environment Sector at EPRI. Sector activities include environmental and economic research and policy analysis examining impacts of electricity production, transmission, and use on the environment and public health. Before joining EPRI, Dr. Surles was program manager of Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) and assistant director for science and technology of the California Energy Commission. Dr. Surles was the associate laboratory director for energy programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, following his time at the California Environmental Protection Agency as deputy secretary for science and technology. Dr. Surles was at Argonne National Laboratory for a number of years, holding several positions in the energy and environmental technology and evaluation area, with his last position being general manager for environmental programs. Dr. Surles holds a B.S. in chemistry from St. Lawrence University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Michigan State University. James L. Sweeney is professor and former chair, Department of Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research, Stanford University. He has been a consultant, director of the Office of Energy Systems, director of the Office of Quantitative Methods, and director of the Office of Energy Systems Modeling and Forecasting, Federal Energy Administration. At Stanford University, he has been chair, Institute of Energy Studies; director, Center for Economic Policy Research; and director, Energy Modeling Forum. He has served on several NRC committees, including the Committee on the National Energy Modeling System and the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. He served on the previous Committee on Benefits of DOE’s R&D on Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy, helping to develop the framework and methodology that the committee applied to evaluating benefits. His research and writings address economic and policy issues important for natural resource production and use; energy markets, including oil, natural gas, and electricity; environmental protection; and the use of mathematical models to analyze energy markets. He has a B.S. degree from MIT and a Ph.D. in engineering-economic systems from Stanford University. John J. Wise (NAE) is retired vice president of research, Mobil Research and Development Corporation. He has also been vice president, Research and Engineering Planning, manager of process and products R&D, manager of exploration and production R&D, director of the Mobil Solar Energy Corporation, and director of the Mobil Foundation. He was on the board of directors of the Industrial Research Institute and was active in the World Petroleum Conference. He was co-chair of the Auto/Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program. He was co-chair of the NRC Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology. He has served on a number of NRC committees, among them the Committee on Transportation and a Sustainable Environment; the Committee on Science and Technology for Countering Terrorism: Panel on Energy Facilities, Cities, and Fixed Infrastructure; and the Committee on Effectiveness and Impact of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards. He served on the previous NRC Committee on Benefits of DOE R&D on Energy Efficiency and Fossil Energy. Dr. Wise has expertise in petroleum exploration and production, petroleum products, including the effects of fuels and engines on emissions, petroleum refining, synthetic fuels manufacture, and R&D management. He received a B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from MIT.