Estimated Amounts, Revised Food Package

Suggested Amounts, Dietary Guidelinesa,b

~1.3 c

2–3 c

~1.7 c

5 c

~1.5 c

3.5–4.5 c

~1.7 c

5–5.5 c

2.1

2

2.9

3

2.1

3

3.5

3

2.3 (whole grain only)

3–5 (aim toward 3 oz equiv whole grain)

1.7 (whole grain only)

7–8 (≥ 3 oz equiv whole grain)

1.2 (whole grain only)

6–7 (≥ 3 oz equiv whole grain)

1.7 (whole grain only)

8–9 (≥ 3 oz equiv whole grain)

2.4

2–4

2.4

6–6.5

1.4

5–5.5

3.4

6.5

eThe number of meat and alternatives servings shown counts dry beans and peanut butter as meat alternatives. Examples of 1-ounce equivalents are 1 oz fish; 1 egg; 1/4 cup cooked dry beans, peas, or lentils; and 1/2 oz peanut butter. If dry beans were counted in the vegetable category, as is done usually, the serving size would be 1/2 cup cooked dry beans. One lb of dried beans per mo (or the equivalent of canned dry beans) provides less than 1/4 cup of cooked dry beans per day (that is, less than one 1-ounce equivalent per day as a meat alternative).

NOTES: † = all servings are from juice; c = cups; oz equiv = ounce equivalent. ~ indicates approximate amounts. Amounts are rounded, and amounts from the revised food package are based on yields of specified foods.

allow the maximum variety of choices for participants to obtain fruits and vegetables. By including a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, the food packages become much more responsive to the preferences of different cultures (ADA, 1994, 1995, 1998a-d, 1999a, 1999b, 2000; Kittler and Sucher, 2004) and are likely to offer more incentives to participate in the WIC program (Herman, 2004; Runnings, 2004). Table 6-6 summarizes how the recommended changes in food packages address Criterion 5, fo-



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