TABLE B-1 Specifications for Foods in the Revised Food Packages

Category / Food

Package Number and Participant Description

Allowable Foods and Minimum Requirements

Infant Foods

Infant formula

I-FF, II-FF

Infants, fully formulafed, 0–11.9 mo

I-BF/FF-B, II-BF/FF

Infants, partially breastfed, 4–11.9 mo

No change from current specifications.

All allowed infant formulas must meet the definitions and requirements for an infant formula as regulated by FDA: Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, definitions [21 USC § 321(z)]; requirements [21 CFR § 106 and §107]; and any updates of these regulations.

The iron fortification level must be 10 mg per liter of formula (as prepared for consumption as directed on the container).

Liquid concentrate, powdered, or ready-to-feed forms of formula are allowed.a

Infant formula, powdered

I-BF/FF-A

Infants, partially breastfed, 1–3.9 mo

Only powdered formula is allowed (except when powdered formula is contraindicated).b

Infant formula, powdered

I-BF

Infants, fully breast-fed

Allowed only during the first month after birth under special conditions. Only powdered formula is allowed (except when powdered formula is contraindicated).b

Baby food fruits and vegetables

II

Infants, 6–11.9 mo

Commercial baby food fruits and vegetables without added sugars, starches, or salt (i.e., sodium). Texture may range from strained through diced.

Fresh banana may replace up to 16 oz of baby food fruit (e.g., 4 4-oz jars per month) at a rate of 1 lb of bananas per 8 oz of baby food fruit.

Infant cereal

II

Infants, 6–11.9 mo

No change from current specifications.

Infant cereal, instant (must conform to USDA commercial item description A-A-20022B and any updates of these regulations)

Must contain a minimum of 45 mg of iron per 100 g of dry cereal.

Infant cereals containing infant formula, milk, fruit, or other noncereal ingredients are not allowed.

Baby food meat

II-BF

Infants, fully breast-fed, 6–11.9 mo

Single major ingredient, commercial baby food meat without added sugars, starches, vegetables, or salt (i.e., sodium). Broth (unsalted; that is,



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