TABLE 2-2 Estimated Prevalence of Inadequacy of Selected Micronutrients and Protein Using Usual Intakes, Children and Women

Nutrient

Estimated Prevalence of Inadequacy (percentage)

WIC Children,

1–1.9 y

(n = 287)

WIC Children,

2–4.9 y

(n = 872)

Pregnant Women and Lactating

Women, 14–44 y

(n = 123)

Non-Breastfeeding Postpartum

Women, 14–44 y

(n = 105)

Iron

1.6

0.4

7.5

9.5

Zinc

0.2

0.1

24.1

<0.1

Selenium

0.3

<0.1

1.4

<0.1

Magnesium

0.1

0.5

49.4

87.5

Phosphorus

0.6

0.2

0.4

0.7

Vitamin A

0.5

0.4

31.2

44.1

Vitamin Ea

55.3

47.0

94.4

99.8

Vitamin C

<0.1

<0.1

32.7

42.2

Thiamin

0.1

<0.1

17.2

3.2

Riboflavin

<0.1

<0.1

3.8

1.2

Niacina

2.5

0.1

8.1

3.3

Vitamin B6

<0.1

<0.1

34.0

17.1

Vitamin B12

0.1

<0.1

1.5

6.6

Folatea

1.2

<0.1

41.5

12.0

Protein

<0.1

<0.1

17.1

4.2

aFor discussion of important issues regarding differences between the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) and dietary intake data in the units used for vitamin E, niacin and folate, please see the section Data SetNutrients Examined in Appendix CNutrient Intake of WIC Subgroups.

NOTES: n = sample size. Details of these analyses are provided in Tables C-2D through C-2G and Tables C-3D through C-3G (protein), in Appendix CNutrient Intake of WIC Subgroups.

DATA SOURCES: Intake data are from 1994–1996 and 1998 Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals (FSRG, 2000); data set does not include intake from dietary supplements (e.g., multivitamin and mineral preparations). All young children were non-breastfed. Intake distributions were calculated using C-SIDE (ISU, 1997). Estimated Average Requirements used in the analysis were from the DRI reports (IOM, 1997, 1998, 2000b, 2001, 2002/2005).

postpartum women (Table 2-3). For WIC infants and children, mean calcium intakes exceeded the Adequate Intake (AI), while for women, mean calcium intakes were low, far below the AI in most cases. Although mean intakes below the AI do not necessarily imply nutrient inadequacy, when mean intakes are far below the AI, concerns about nutrient adequacy may arise. (See Appendix CNutrient Intake of WIC Subgroups—for details of the methodology.)



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