Appendixes



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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances Appendixes

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Ruth A. David, Chair, is the president and chief executive officer of ANSER, an independent, not-for-profit, public-service research institution. In November 1999, Dr. David initiated ANSER’s Homeland Defense Strategic Thrust to address the growing national concern of multidimensional, asymmetric threats from rogue nations, substate terrorist groups, and domestic terrorists. In May 2001, the ANSER Institute of Homeland Security was established to enhance public awareness and education and contribute to the dialog on a national, state, and local level. From September 1995 to September 1998, Dr. David was deputy director for science and technology at the Central Intelligence Agency. As technical advisor to the director of central intelligence, she was responsible for research, development, and deployment of technologies in support of all phases of the intelligence process. She represented the CIA on numerous national committees and advisory bodies, including the National Science and Technology Council and the Committee on National Security. Previously, Dr. David served in several leadership positions at the Sandia National Laboratories, where she began her professional career in 1975. Most recently, she was director of advanced information technologies. From 1991 to 1994, Dr. David was director of the development testing center that developed and operated a broad spectrum of full-scale engineering test facilities. Dr. David is a member of the Department of Homeland Security Advisory Council, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Corporation for the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. She is vice chair of the HSAC Senior Advisory Committee of Academia and Policy Research and serves on the National Security Agency Advisory Board, the National Academy of Engineering Committee on Engineering Education, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Committee on Scientific Freedom and Responsibility, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Technical Division’s Advisory Board, and the External Advisory Committee for Purdue University’s Homeland Security Institute. Dr. David is a former adjunct professor at the University of New Mexico and has technical experience in digital and microprocessor-based system design, digital signal analysis, adaptive signal analysis, and system integration. Dr. David received a B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Wichita State University (1975), an M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Stanford University (1976), and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University (1981).

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances Steven R.J. Brueck is the director of the Center for High Technology Materials (CHTM) and is a professor of electrical and computer engineering and a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of New Mexico. As CHTM director, he manages research and education at the boundaries of two disciplines. The first, optoelectronics, unites optics and electronics and is found in CHTM’s emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors, and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications. Examples of these unifying themes at work are Si-based optoelectronics and optoelectronics for Si manufacturing sensors. He is also a former research staff member of MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and the Materials Research Society, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a fellow of the Optical Society of America. Stephen W. Drew holds consultancies with a variety of pharmaceutical and biotechnology organizations. Until 2000, he worked with Merck & Company, Inc., in a series of increasingly responsible positions culminating with distinguished senior scientist. He held vice presidential positions of responsibility in the Merck Manufacturing Division (MMD) as the vice president of Vaccine Science and Technology, vice president of Vaccine Operations, and vice president of Technical Operations and Engineering. Prior to joining MMD in 1987, he was the senior director of Biochemical Engineering in the Merck Research Laboratories (MRL), a department that he started in 1981. Dr. Drew received his Ph.D. in biochemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Drew is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He has served in several capacities within the NAE and assisted numerous National Research Council committees. He was chair of the advisory committee to the Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation and has launched two companies that service the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. Alan H. Epstein received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in aeronautics and astronautics. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and is currently the R.C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the director of the Gas Turbine Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His responsibilities include teaching and research in aerospace propulsion, fluid mechanics, power production, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). He has been an active consultant to industry and government for more than 25 years—his activities have included gas turbine design and operation, MEMS, system testing and advanced instrumentation, military infrared systems, and vehicle observable technology. Dr. Epstein is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the NRC Army Science Board and of the DARPA Defense Science Research Council. Robert A. Fuhrman is retired vice chairman of the board, president, and chief operating officer of Lockheed Corporation, and past chair of the Air Force Science and Technology Board. He has had a distinguished career, having served as Lockheed’s president and chief operating officer and group president for missiles and space, as well as in numerous other positions. Mr. Fuhrman received his B.S. degree in engineering from the University of Michigan and his M.S. in fluid mechanics and dynamics from the University of Maryland. Mr. Fuhrman serves on numerous boards and is a member of many professional societies. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, an AIAA honorary fellow, and a former member of the Defense Science Board.

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances Sharon C. Glotzer is an associate professor of chemical engineering, materials science and engineering, physics, and macromolecular science and engineering at the University of Michigan. She worked previously at NIST, where she was co-founder and director of the Center for Theoretical and Computational Materials Science. She is a recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award and the APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award, a Department of Commerce Bronze Medal Award, and an NRC postdoctoral fellowship, and was a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer from 2000 to 2003. She is an active member of the APS, AIChe, MRS, ACS, and AAAS; Dr. Glotzer is first vice chair for the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum of the AIChE and vice chair of the Forum on Industrial and Applied Physics of the APS. Dr. Glotzer has presented well over 100 invited presentations and keynote talks at conferences and national professional society meetings and has served as a reviewer of NRC reports. She received her B.S. degree in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and her Ph.D. in physics from Boston University. Christopher C. Green is currently executive director of emergent technologies research at Detroit Medical Center, Wayne State School of Medicine. He is also a fellow in neuroimaging and an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. He is chair of the Joint Independent Science Panel Office/Undersecretary of Operations Research, Department of the Army, and a member of the Medical Subcommittee, Local Emergency Planning Committee, State of Michigan Regional Homeland Defense. He serves on many biotechnology and medical boards of directors. Immediately prior to his current position, he was executive director for both Global Emerging Technology Policy (in GM’s Public Policy Center) and also the chief technology officer and executive director of regional science and technology (for GM Asia Pacific Operations). He managed formulation of corporate policy directives in newly emergent issues of health and safety and industrial medicine, and numerous occupational medical research programs. His distinguished career with the CIA extended from 1969 to 1985 as a senior division analyst with the Office of Scientific and Weapons Intelligence. In this role he obtained multidisciplinary research and management experience in medicine, comparative biology, bioengineering, animal and human physiology, endocrinology, and life sciences. Special areas of management experience included the direction of research of doctoral-level and physician scientists in the above areas as well as participation as a senior analyst. He continues as an agency consultant. His medical specialty is forensic medicine and toxicology, and his doctoral research work in neurophysiology concerned human biochemical functioning of the brain, with a focus on functional brain imaging and clinical MRI. Dr. Green was an analyst with the Life Sciences Division, Chief of the Biomedical Sciences Branch/LSD, and deputy division chief. He became a senior division analyst with the newly formed Office of Scientific and Weapons Intelligence in 1978. He received his bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University in pre-med, his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado Medical School in neurophysiology, and his M.D. from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas/Monterey, Mexico, with honors. He also holds the National Intelligence Medal. Diane E. Griffin is professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology and director of the Johns Hopkins Malaria Institute at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She earned a biology degree from Augustana College in 1962, followed by M.D. (1968) and Ph.D. (1970) degrees from Stanford University. She interned at Stanford University Hospital between 1968 and 1970, before beginning her career at Johns Hopkins as a postdoctoral fellow in virology and infectious disease in 1970. After completing her postdoctoral work, she was named an assistant professor of medicine and neurology. Since then, she has held the positions of associate professor, professor, and

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances now professor and chair. She served as an investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute from 1973 to 1979. Dr. Griffin’s research interest includes alphaviruses and acute encephalitis. She is also working on the effect of measles virus infection, and immune activation in response to infection, on immune responses in tissue culture and in infected humans at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. In Zambia, she and her colleagues are examining the effect of HIV infection on measles and measles virus immunization. Dr. Griffin is the principal investigator on a variety of grants from the National Institutes of Health, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Dana Foundation. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine, is the author or co-author of a number of scholarly papers and articles, is the past president of the American Society for Virology, and is the current president of the Association of Medical School Microbiology Chairs. J. Jerome Holton is the director of Technical Research, Analyses and Communications with Defense Group, Inc. In this position he is responsible for DGI’s branding, strategic planning, and positioning in the government support sector, including the policy, technology, and operations issues for weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and their effects on civilian infrastructure, first responders, military forces, and tactical operations. He has been involved in defense and energy programs related to the counter-proliferation of, counterterrorism/domestic preparedness issues for, and the detection, identification, and decontamination of chemical and biological weapons. He has provided advice and counsel to senior decision makers in the Office of the Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Counterproliferation and Chemical/Biological Defense, the Chemical Biological Defense Directorate of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and the Chemical Biological National Security Program of the Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Holton has previously served with the National Academies as a member of the Committee on Alternatives to Anti-Personnel Landmines and as a reviewer for the NRC report Army Science and Technology for Homeland Security. He earned his Ph.D. in experimental physics from Duke University. Michael R. Ladisch is the director of the Laboratory of Renewable Resources, Engineering Department, and Distinguished Professor of Agricultural and Biological Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Purdue University. He earned his B.S. degree from Drexel University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Purdue University, all in chemical engineering. His areas of expertise are bio-separations, bio-nanotechnology bioprocess engineering, and bio-energy. His research has resulted in systematic approaches and correlations for scaling up chromatographic purification techniques from the laboratory to process-scale manufacturing systems. He is currently investigating the scale-down of bio-separations and the rapid prototyping of microfluidic biochips for the rapid detection of pathogenic microorganisms. He is familiar with biotechnologies and has a broad background in bioscience and bioengineering. His work has resulted in 150 publications, a textbook on bioseparations, 14 patents (issued and applied for) and over 100 presented papers at national professional society meetings, and he has been the recipient of numerous research and teaching awards. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1999 for developing and scaling up new approaches and materials for process chromatography, adsorptive bioseparations, and biocatalysis. He has served as a member of U.S. delegations and advisory panels to Russia, Thailand, China, and Japan to review the status of biotechnology programs. He has also chaired several committees within the National Research Council concerning biotechnology. Darrell D.E. Long is professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz and director of the Storage Systems Research Center in the Jack Baskin School of Engineering. He has broad research interests in the area of computing systems, including operating systems, distributed systems,

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances high-performance storage systems, fault tolerance, performance evaluation, and mobile computing. He received his B.S. degree in computer science from San Diego State University in 1984 and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and engineering from the University of California, San Diego in 1986 and 1988, respectively. He is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery and of the Usenix Association, where he serves as the chair of the Scholars Committee, and he is a senior member of the IEEE Computer Society, for which he has served as chair of the Technical Committee on Operating Systems, and now serves on the Executive Committee of the Technical Committee on Operating Systems. He also serves on the National Security Panel and Intelligence Subpanel for Los Alamos and Livermore National Laboratories. Frederick R. Lopez has a 33-year career as an engineer with McDonnell-Douglas Aircraft Company and Raytheon Company. He is also a retired brigadier general, United States Marine Corps Reserves. Currently, he is the director of engineering for Raytheon Electronic Warfare Systems in Goleta, California. General Lopez is responsible for the management of all engineering personnel in support of operational and support programs in electronic warfare systems and for the implementation of engineering processes and process improvement activities within the engineering discipline. Highlights in his Marine Corps career include a tour of duty in Vietnam and service as an Infantry Officer with Master Parachutist Qualification, secondary Military Occupational Specialty of Forward Air Controller (FAC). He has held billets as company XO, company commander, battalion XO, battalion CO, FAC, and naval gunfire team leader, brigade platoon leader, ANGLICO operations officer, regimental operations officer, assistant division commander, commanding general, 4th Marine Division. He served 3 years on active duty and 27 years in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve. General Lopez received a B.S. degree in mathematics from California State Polytechnic College and his M.S. in computer science from West Coast University, Orange, California. Richard M. Osgood, Jr., joined Columbia University in 1981 and became Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics in 1988. From 2000 to 2004, he served as associate laboratory director at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Osgood was, with Professor Yang, a co-founder of the Columbia Microelectronics Sciences Laboratories (MSL) and has served as director or co-director of MSL and the Columbia Radiation Laboratory (CRL). He is a member of the ACS and the MRS and a fellow of the IEEE and OSA. He was co-editor of Applied Physics (1983-1995) and associate editor of the IEEE Journal of Quantum Electronics (1981-1988). Dr. Osgood serves as a consultant to numerous research institutions and government agencies, including MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He was also on the DARPA Defense Sciences Research Council (Materials Research Council) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Visiting Advisory Board (Chemical Sciences and Technology Division). Dr. Osgood has served as councilor of the Materials Research Society and as a member of the DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. In 1991, Dr. Osgood received the R.W. Wood Award from the Optical Society of America and was invited to deliver the OIDTA lecture at the Japanese Optical Association. His research interests include integrated optical devices and design, surface physics, and laser sources. He received his B.S. degree from the U.S. Military Academy, his M.S. in physics from Ohio State University, and his Ph.D. in physics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Stewart D. Personick is a member of the Board of Directors of Optical Communications Products, Inc., a member of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission’s Technological Advisory Council, and a consultant to industry in the field of telecommunications and networking. From September 1998 to August 2003, he was the E. Warren Colehower Chair and Professor of Telecommunications at Drexel

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances University and the director of Drexel’s Center for Telecommunications and Information Networking. From 1970 to 1985 he worked as an individual contributor, and as a research manager (Bell Laboratories, TRW, Bellcore), in the field of optical communications technology and applications. Since 1985 he has focused his research and management activities on emerging and next-generation telecommunications systems, technologies, and applications. He was a vice president, in charge of a wide variety of research and systems engineering efforts, at Bellcore (now Telcordia Technologies) from September 1985 to July 1998. He also served as the senior management link from Bellcore and its telecommunications industry clients to the emerging Internet community. He served as a member, and as chair, of the U.S. Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee during the critical transition of the NSFnet to the current set of commercial and federally sponsored networks. He holds a B.E.E. (1967) from the City College of New York/CUNY, and an S.M. (1968) and an Sc.D. (1970) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a fellow of the IEEE (1983), a fellow of the Optical Society of America (1988), and a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering (1992). He received the IEEE/OSA John Tyndall Award in 2000 in recognition of his pioneering contributions to optical fiber communications technologies, systems, and applications. Alton D. Romig, Jr., is currently vice president, Nonproliferation and Assessments, at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. His responsibilities include the leadership and management of the development and engineering activities that provide systems, science, technology, and expertise in support of national objectives to reduce the threat to the United States from proliferation and use of weapons of mass destruction. Program areas include remote sensing, proliferation assessment, intelligence activities, international security, physical security, and nuclear/chemical/biological nonproliferation and counterintelligence. Dr. Romig is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is active on a number of National Academy of Engineering/National Research Council committees and boards. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and TMS (The Metals, Minerals and Materials Society). Dr. Romig is also a fellow and former president of ASM, International (formerly, American Society for Metals). He also serves on the boards of Atomic Weapons Establishment Management Limited, a Lockheed Martin joint venture company in the United Kingdom, and Technology Ventures Corporation, a Lockheed Martin subsidiary dedicated to technology commercialization. For his pioneering work in analytical electron microscopy and solid-state diffusion, Dr. Romig has received several awards, including the Burton Medal (1988), awarded by the Electron Microscopy Society of America to an Outstanding Young Scientist; the K.F.J. Heinrich Award (1991), given by the Microbeam Analysis Society to an Outstanding Young Scientist; the ASM Silver Medal for Outstanding Materials Research (1992); and the Acta Metallurgica International Lectureship (1993-1994). Dr. Romig has also been named the 2003 ASM-TMS Distinguished Lecturer in Materials and Society. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in materials science and engineering from Lehigh University in 1975, 1977, and 1979, respectively. In 1979, he joined Sandia National Laboratories as a member of the technical staff, Physical Metallurgy Division. After a variety of management assignments, he was named director, Materials and Process Sciences, in 1992. From 1995 to 1999, he was director of Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components. In 1999, he was named chief technology officer and vice president for Science, Technology, and Partnerships. In that role, he was chief scientific officer for the Nuclear Weapons program, accountable for Sandia’s interactions with industry and the Laboratories’ Campus Executive program. In addition, he was responsible for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. He served in this capacity until attaining his present position in 2003.

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances S. Shankar Sastry was chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley from 2001 to 2004. The previous year, he served as director of the Information Technology Office at DARPA. From 1996 to 1999, he was the director of the Electronics Research Laboratory at Berkeley, an organized research unit on the Berkeley campus conducting research in computer sciences and all aspects of electrical engineering. He is currently the NEC Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and a professor of bioengineering. Dr. Sastry received his Ph.D. degree in 1981 from the University of California, Berkeley. He was on the faculty of MIT as an assistant professor from 1980 to 1982 and at Harvard University as a chaired Gordon McKay professor in 1994. He has held visiting appointments at the Australian National University, Canberra, the University of Rome, Scuola Normale, and the University of Pisa, as well as at the CNRS laboratory LAAS in Toulouse (poste rouge), as professor invite at Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (CNRS laboratory VERIMAG), and as a Vinton Hayes visiting fellow at the Center for Intelligent Control Systems at MIT. His areas of research are embedded and autonomous software, computer vision, computation in novel substrates such as DNA, nonlinear and adaptive control, robotic telesurgery, control of hybrid systems, embedded systems, sensor networks, and biological motor control. Dr. Sastry has served as associate editor for numerous publications, including IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, IEEE Control Magazine; IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems; the Journal of Mathematical Systems, Estimation and Control; IMA Journal of Control and Information; the International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing; and the Journal of Biomimetic Systems and Materials. He has coauthored over 300 technical papers and books. Dr. Sastry was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2001 and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2004. He also received the President of India Gold Medal in 1977, the IBM Faculty Development Award for 1983–1985, the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, the Eckman Award of the American Automatic Control Council in 1990, an M.A. (honoris causa) from Harvard University in 1994, election as a fellow of the IEEE in 1994, the distinguished Alumnus Award of the Indian Institute of Technology in 1999, and the David Marr Prize for the best paper at the International Conference in Computer Vision in 1999. James B. Smith is vice president of Precision Engagement at Raytheon. Precision Engagement is a Raytheon Company strategic business area (SBA) that draws on the capabilities of the entire company. Precision engagement is the ability to locate, discern, and track objectives or targets; to employ the best systems available to achieve the desired effects; to assess results; and to reengage with decisive speed and overwhelming operational tempo as required. Precision engagement is effects-based engagement, relevant to all types of operations. Prior to his current position, he served as director of Navy C2 programs, Lockheed Martin Mission Systems. He retired from the U.S. Air Force as a brigadier general and served as commander, Joint War Fighting Center, U.S. Joint Forces Command, Joint Training Analysis and Simulation Center. He was responsible for managing the joint force exercise and training development program and the modeling, simulation, and deploying of solutions that demonstrated a high probability of operational success. A carrier fighter pilot, General Smith logged nearly 4000 flight hours in the F-15 and T-38 and flew combat missions during the Gulf War. He is a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy with a bachelor’s degree in military history; he holds a master’s degree in history from Indiana University. Camillo J. Taylor is currently an associate professor in the Computer and Information Science Department of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include reconstructing and rerendering three-dimensional images from two-dimensional images and vision-guided robotic systems. He has

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Avoiding Surprise in an Era of Global Technology Advances refereed many journal publications with the most recent being “A Vision-Based Formation Control Framework.” His most recent of the many refereed conference proceedings is “Camera Trajectory Estimation using Inertial Sensor Measurements and Structure from Motion Results.” Dr. Taylor received his A.B. degree in electrical computer and systems engineering from Harvard College, his M.S. degree in computer engineering from Yale University, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Yale University. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Association for Computing Machinery and has received numerous awards throughout his career. Dianne S. Wiley is a Boeing Technical Fellow for Space Exploration Systems, NASA Systems, Washington, D.C. She recently left the Missile Defense National Team, where she was responsible for international coordination of Defense of Deployed Forces, Friends, and Allies. In addition to managing proposal strategy and execution for the enterprise, she also serves as the enterprise liaison to the Boeing Technical Fellowship to facilitate technology maturation and technology transition to the space exploration systems business area. Previously, Dr. Wiley was assigned to the Missile Defense National Team, responsible for international missile defense activities for defense of friends and allies and defense of U.S. deployed forces. In her prior assignment with the Boeing Phantom Works, she was the program manager for airframe technology on the NASA Space Launch Initiative Program, overseeing the development and demonstration of advanced structure and materials technology for next-generation reusable launch vehicles. Previously, she was with Northrop Grumman for 20 years where she was manager of Airframe Technology. In that position, Dr. Wiley was responsible for research and development and technology transition in structural design and analysis, materials and processes, and manufacturing technology. During this time, she was responsible for transitioning airframe core technologies into three new business areas (space, biomedicine, and surface ships) to offset declines in traditional business. Before that, she served as a senior technical specialist on the B-2 program. Dr. Wiley was responsible for developing and implementing innovative structural solutions to ensure the structural integrity of the B-2 aircraft. Dr. Wiley’s 25 years of technical experience have involved durability and damage tolerance, advanced composites (organic and ceramic), high-temperature structures, smart structures, low-observable structures, concurrent engineering, and rapid prototyping. Dr. Wiley holds a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from UCLA School of Engineering and Applied Science. She attended Defense Systems Management College (1996). She is a graduate of the Center for Creative Leadership (1995), Leadership California Class of 1998, and the Boeing Leadership Center (2002).