Appendix C
Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers

R. Stephen Berry is now James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago and is also special advisor to the director for national security at Argonne National Laboratory. He received his undergraduate and graduate education at Harvard, entering in 1948 and completing his doctorate in February 1956. He was an instructor at the University of Michigan and an assistant professor at Yale from 1960 until 1964, when he moved to the University of Chicago. He has been a member of its Chemistry Department, its James Franck Institute, the College, and the School of Public Policy Studies. His scientific activities have involved both experimental and theoretical studies. They have included studies in electronic structure of atoms and molecules, atomic and molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, chaos and regularity, atomic and molecular clusters, thermodynamics (especially of finite-time processes), and most recently, protein dynamics. His activities in areas of public policy have involved efficient use of energy and resources, science education at the middle and high school level, science and law, and of course the distribution of and access to scientific information.

Berry is married, with three children and seven grandchildren. He continues to enjoy skiing, hiking, and fly fishing, as well as music and photography.

Martin Blume is editor-in-chief of the American Physical Society, on leave from his position as senior physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He received a B.A. from Princeton and a Ph.D. in theoretical solid-state physics from Harvard. At Brookhaven he has served as head of condensed matter theory, chairman of the National Synchrotron Light Source Department, and deputy director of the laboratory. He has also held a joint appointment as professor of physics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Since 1997 he has been editor-in-chief of the American Physical Society, with responsibility for all of the Physical Review journals, Physical Review Letters, and Reviews of Modern Physics. The challenge of electronic publishing and associated questions of intellectual property, archiving, peer review, cost containment and recovery, and provision of journals to all who need them are among those that must be addressed in this time of change in scholarly communication.

Charles P. Casey received his early education in St. Louis, Missouri (B.S. in chemistry, St. Louis University, 1963). His graduate research with George M. Whitesides at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) was on organocopper compounds. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1967, he spent several months at Harvard University as a National Science Foundation (NSF) fellow in the laboratories of Paul D. Bartlett. In 1968, he joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he is now Homer B. Adkins Professor of Chemistry and Steenbock Professor in the Physical Sciences. He was department chair at Wisconsin from 1998 to 2001. He was President of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in 2004.

Professor Casey’s research focuses on mechanistic organometallic chemistry. The mechanisms of important catalytic processes including hydroformylation, hydrogenation, and alkene polymerization are being explored. His group has characterized d0 yttrium-alkyl-alkene complexes as models for the key intermediate in metallocene-catalyzed alkene polymerizations. Earlier work involved metal-carbene-alkene complexes and their role in both cyclo-propanation and olefin metathesis, chelating diphosphines with wide natural bite angles as effective ligands for highly regioselective hydroformylations, and heterobimetallic compounds. He is author of more than 250 papers in organometallic chemistry.

Dr. Casey is a member of the National Academy of



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Are Chemical Journals too Expensive and Inaccessible? A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Appendix C Biographic Sketches of Workshop Speakers R. Stephen Berry is now James Franck Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago and is also special advisor to the director for national security at Argonne National Laboratory. He received his undergraduate and graduate education at Harvard, entering in 1948 and completing his doctorate in February 1956. He was an instructor at the University of Michigan and an assistant professor at Yale from 1960 until 1964, when he moved to the University of Chicago. He has been a member of its Chemistry Department, its James Franck Institute, the College, and the School of Public Policy Studies. His scientific activities have involved both experimental and theoretical studies. They have included studies in electronic structure of atoms and molecules, atomic and molecular collisions, chemical kinetics, chaos and regularity, atomic and molecular clusters, thermodynamics (especially of finite-time processes), and most recently, protein dynamics. His activities in areas of public policy have involved efficient use of energy and resources, science education at the middle and high school level, science and law, and of course the distribution of and access to scientific information. Berry is married, with three children and seven grandchildren. He continues to enjoy skiing, hiking, and fly fishing, as well as music and photography. Martin Blume is editor-in-chief of the American Physical Society, on leave from his position as senior physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He received a B.A. from Princeton and a Ph.D. in theoretical solid-state physics from Harvard. At Brookhaven he has served as head of condensed matter theory, chairman of the National Synchrotron Light Source Department, and deputy director of the laboratory. He has also held a joint appointment as professor of physics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Since 1997 he has been editor-in-chief of the American Physical Society, with responsibility for all of the Physical Review journals, Physical Review Letters, and Reviews of Modern Physics. The challenge of electronic publishing and associated questions of intellectual property, archiving, peer review, cost containment and recovery, and provision of journals to all who need them are among those that must be addressed in this time of change in scholarly communication. Charles P. Casey received his early education in St. Louis, Missouri (B.S. in chemistry, St. Louis University, 1963). His graduate research with George M. Whitesides at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology (MIT) was on organocopper compounds. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1967, he spent several months at Harvard University as a National Science Foundation (NSF) fellow in the laboratories of Paul D. Bartlett. In 1968, he joined the faculty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he is now Homer B. Adkins Professor of Chemistry and Steenbock Professor in the Physical Sciences. He was department chair at Wisconsin from 1998 to 2001. He was President of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in 2004. Professor Casey’s research focuses on mechanistic organometallic chemistry. The mechanisms of important catalytic processes including hydroformylation, hydrogenation, and alkene polymerization are being explored. His group has characterized d0 yttrium-alkyl-alkene complexes as models for the key intermediate in metallocene-catalyzed alkene polymerizations. Earlier work involved metal-carbene-alkene complexes and their role in both cyclo-propanation and olefin metathesis, chelating diphosphines with wide natural bite angles as effective ligands for highly regioselective hydroformylations, and heterobimetallic compounds. He is author of more than 250 papers in organometallic chemistry. Dr. Casey is a member of the National Academy of

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Are Chemical Journals too Expensive and Inaccessible? A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received the Alumni Merit Award from St. Louis University, an Alexander von Humboldt Senior Award, a fellowship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, the Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award of the ACS, and the ACS Award in Organometallic Chemistry; he was a National Science Council Distinguished Lecturer in Taiwan. Lou Ann Di Nallo is associate director, Information and Knowledge Integration, at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS). She directs the content integration and access function, which includes 19 people at five sites serving scientists and knowledge workers within the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and throughout the company. She leads content development and library systems in physical and virtual libraries as well as client services (document delivery, subscriptions, training, and marketing). She has been involved with electronic information over her entire career in a variety of positions in both for-profit and nonprofit settings. Prior to joining BMS she was electronic resources manager at the Hagerty Library, Drexel University, where she also taught undergraduate and graduate information courses as an adjunct faculty member. Michael Doyle received his B.S. degree from the College of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, and his Ph.D. degree from Iowa State University. Following a postdoctoral engagement at the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, he joined the faculty at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, in 1968. In 1984, he moved to another undergraduate institution, Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas, as the Dr. D. R. Semmes Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, and 13 years later he went to Tucson, Arizona, as professor of chemistry at the University of Arizona and vice president of Research Corporation. He came to the University of Maryland as professor and chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2003. Doyle has been the recipient of a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (1973), a Chemical Manufacturers Association Catalyst Award (1982), the American Chemical Society Award for Research at Undergraduate Institutions (1988), Doctor Honoris Causa from the Russian Academy of Sciences (1994), Alexander von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award (1995), the James Flack Norris Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education (1995), and the George C. Pimentel Award for Chemical Education (2002). He has written or coauthored 10 books, and 21 book chapters, and he is the coauthor of more than 250 research publications. Through his role in the creation of the Council on Undergraduate Research, the National Conferences on Undergraduate Research, and other organizations and studies, he is knowledgeable about the environment for research at predominantly undergraduate institutions. Peter Gregory is managing director of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s publishing operation, based in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Prior to this he worked for Wiley-VCH in Germany where he was responsible for the chemical engineering, industrial chemistry, and materials science programmes. He was also editor-in-chief of the journal Advanced Materials for more than 13 years after leaving his career in research. Peter therefore has been a researcher, an author, a referee, an editor, a commercial publisher, and now a not-for-profit publisher. Gordon G. Hammes is the University Distinguished Service Professor of Biochemistry at Duke University. He joined the faculty at Duke in 1991 and served as vice chancellor for Medical Center academic affairs from 1991 to 1998. He was a faculty member at MIT and Cornell University prior to his appointment at Duke University. Dr. Hammes’ awards and honors include an award in biological chemistry from the American Chemical Society (1967); he is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1973), a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1974), and a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty Scholar (1975-1976); he received the 2002 William C. Rose award of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He has published more than 225 scientific publications, including two books on chemical kinetics, a book on enzyme catalysis and regulation, and a book on thermodynamics and kinetics for the biological sciences. Dr. Hammes received his doctorate in 1959 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and was an NSF postdoctoral fellow at the Max Plank Institut, Göttingen, Germany, from 1959 to 1960. During his professional career, Dr. Hammes has been involved in various education and training programs, was president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and served on NIH training grant and research panels. Stevan Harnad was born in Hungary, did his undergraduate work at McGill University and his graduate work at Princeton University, and is currently Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Science at the University of Quebec, Montreal. His research is on categorization, communication, and cognition. Founder and editor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (a paper journal published by Cambridge University Press), Psycoloquy (an electronic journal sponsored by the American Psychological Association) and the CogPrints Electronic Preprint Archive in the Cognitive Sciences, he is past president of the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and author and contributor to more than 150 publications, including Origins and Evolution of Language and Speech (NY Academy of Sciences, 1976), Lateralization in the Nervous System (Academic Press, 1977), Peer Commentary on Peer Review: A Case Study in Scientific Quality Control (Cambridge University Press, 1982), Categorical Perception: The Groundwork of Cognition (Cambridge University Press, 1987), The Selection of Behavior: The Operant Behaviorism

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Are Chemical Journals too Expensive and Inaccessible? A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable of BF Skinner: Comments and Consequences (Cambridge University Press,1988) and Icon, Category, Symbol: Essays on the Foundations and Fringes of Cognition (in preparation). Patrick Jackson is publishing director, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Elsevier. His background is in the natural sciences, and he has worked for more than 30 years in the scientific, technical, and medical (STM) publishing industry in various editorial and management functions in the life sciences, clinical, and chemical sciences areas. He is currently responsible for the strategic and operational development of Elsevier’s primary publications in chemistry and chemical engineering, with responsibility for about 100 core chemistry journals and more than 80 new book and major reference work publications per year. He is physically located in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Michael A. Keller is the Ida M. Green University Librarian, director of Academic Information Resources, publisher of HighWire Press, and publisher of the Stanford University Press. These titles touch on his major professional pre-occupations: commitment to support of research, teaching, and learning; effective deployment of information technology hand-in-hand with materials; and active involvement in the evolution and growth of scholarly communication. He may be best known at present for his distinctively entrepreneurial style of librarianship. As university librarian, he endeavors to champion deep collecting of traditional library materials (especially manuscripts and archival materials) concurrent with full engagement in emerging information technologies. Keller was educated at Hamilton College (B.A. biology-music 1967), State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo (M.A., musicology, 1970)), SUNY, Geneseo (M.L.S., 1971), and SUNY, Buffalo (all but dissertation Ph.D., Musicology). From 1973 to 1981, he served as music librarian and senior lecturer in musicology at Cornell University and then in a similar capacity at University of California (UC), Berkeley. While at Berkeley, he also taught musicology at Stanford University and began the complete revision of the definitive music research and reference materials, an annotated bibliography popularly known as Duckles in honor of its original compiler. Yale called him to the post of associate university librarian and director of collection development in 1986. In 1993, he joined the Stanford staff as the Ida M. Green Director of Libraries. In 1994, he was named to his current position of university librarian and director of academic information resources. In 1995, by establishing HighWire Press, he became its publisher, and in April 2000, he was assigned similar strategic duty for Stanford University Press. Ulrich Pöschl is the head of the Aerosol Research Group at the Institute of Hydrochemistry, Technical University of Munich, Germany (http://www.ch.tum.de/wasser/aerosol). He studied chemistry at the Technical University of Graz, Austria, and worked as a postdoctoral fellow and research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Mainz, Germany. His current research and teaching activities are focused on the effects of aerosols on atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and public health (field measurements, laboratory experiments, and modeling of aerosol particle composition, structure, reactivity, and water interactions). As the initiator and chief executive editor of the open-access journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP, www.atmos-chem-phys.org) he started and established an innovative and successful initiative for improved scientific publishing and quality assurance in collaboration with a globally distributed network of coeditors. Moreover, he serves as the president of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). Christopher A. Reed is distinguished professor at the University of California, Riverside. He obtained his Ph.D. at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, in 1971 and, after postdoctoral studies at Stanford University, served on the faculty of the University of Southern California for 25 years. His research interests span inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. His current work involves carboranes and the synthesis of the strongest known Brønsted acids. His research has been recognized by Sloan, Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, Guggenheim, and senior von Humboldt awards. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and serves on the Executive Board of the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry and the Editorial Advisory Boards of Chemical Communications, Accounts of Chemical Research, and Heteroatom Chemistry. Essays on the chemical literature include “Drowning in a Sea of Refereed Publications” in Chemical and Engineering News, (January 29, 2001); “Electronic Access to Journals” in Chemical and Engineering News, (October 29, 2002); and “Publish and Perish” in the Chronicle of Higher Education (February 20, 2004). These can be accessed at http://reedgroup.ucr.edu. Brian Simboli is a science librarian at Lehigh University and a part-time writer. He attended Swarthmore College for his undergraduate work and received a Ph.D. in philosophy from Notre Dame, as well as an M.S. in library science from Drexel University. Arnold Thackray received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University. He has held faculty appointments in Oxford (visiting fellow, All Souls College), Cambridge (fellow, Churchill College), and at the London School of Economics, Harvard, the Institute for Advanced Study, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford), and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He was founding chairman of, and

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Are Chemical Journals too Expensive and Inaccessible? A Workshop Summary to the Chemical Sciences Roundtable Joseph Priestley Professor in, the Department of History and Sociology of Science at the University of Pennsylvania. Thackray’s scholarly interests lie in the historiography of science and in understanding technology, medicine, and science as elements of modern culture. He served as editor of Isis, the official journal of the History of Science Society, for seven years, and as editor of the society’s newer journal, Osiris, for ten years. He has been active in the public life of scholarship, serving on a number of boards, including that of the American Council on Education, and is a former president of the Society for Social Studies of Science and was treasurer of the American Council of Learned Societies for more than a decade. Thackray is a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Historical Society, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was founding director, and now serves as president, of the Chemical Heritage Foundation. Andrea Twiss-Brooks is the bibliographer for chemistry, physics, geophysical sciences, and technology at the University of Chicago’s John Crerar Library. She is active in the American Chemical Society’s Division of Chemical Information, where she has served in a variety of roles, including that of division chair. Andrea has also been involved in the organization of technical symposia at ACS national meetings on topics related to chemistry publishing, including most recently a session on open-access issues in scholarly publishing. She is current chair of the American Chemical Society Joint Board-Council Committee on Chemical Abstracts Service and also a member of library advisory groups to ACS Publications and to Chemical Abstracts Service.