TABLE C-1 Effect of Visiting on Opinions of the United States

 

(1)

(2)

(3)

USTRAVEL

0.109

(4.00)***

0.122

(4.52)***

0.102

(1.98)**

Extra Controls?

NO

YES

YES

Sample

ALL

ALL

At least a college education; age strictly less than 46 yearsa

N

11,406

11,406

2,303

R-Squared

0.251

0.296

0.281

aAll respondents in the Pew dataset were over 18 years old.

from 0. Two asterisks indicate significance at the 5 percent level; and three stars indicate significance at the 1 percent level.

The coefficient of USTRAVEL is quite significant in regressions (1) and (2). The coefficient is still significant in regression (3), but the t-statistic is somewhat smaller, probably owing in part to the smaller sample.

Our estimate of the effect of traveling to the United States on one’s opinion of the United States is moderately large, but not enormous: A visit to the United States apparently raises a person’s opinion of the United States by about 0.1 point on a scale that runs from 0 to 3.

Attitudes Toward US Science and Technology

Suppose we had a measure of people’s attitudes toward the United States before they visited. We would be able to estimate the effect of visiting the United States on their attitudes much more convincingly. Although we do not have such data, we do have data on whether they admire United States scientific and technological achievements. People in nearly every part the world frequently come into contact with United States scientific and technological achievements (cars, for example), so it is plausible that their feelings about United States scientific and technological achievements (ADUSST) are almost fully formed by repeated experiences with products in their home countries. Perhaps, then, visiting the United States (USTRAVEL) has little effect on attitudes toward United States science and



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