Appendix D
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Eric J. Barron (chair) is dean of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and a distinguished professor of geosciences at the Pennsylvania State University. He led Penn State’s Earth System Sciences Center for 15 years and has chaired many committees related to global change, including the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC), its Climate Research Committee, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Earth Observing System Science Executive Committee. Dr. Barron’s research interests are in climate modeling, hydrology, and Earth system history. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society.


Roger C. Bales is a professor of hydrology and water resources in the School of Engineering at the University of California, Merced. His research interests focus on snow hydrology, hydrogeochemistry, water resources, and climate impacts. He was principal investigator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Climate Assessment for the Southwest Project, which examined the impacts of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest. Dr. Bales is a former member of the NRC Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data and Committee on Hydrologic Studies. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society.


John B. Carberry is director of environmental technology at the DuPont



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Thinking Strategically: The Appropriate Use of Metrics for the Climate Change Science Program Appendix D Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Eric J. Barron (chair) is dean of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and a distinguished professor of geosciences at the Pennsylvania State University. He led Penn State’s Earth System Sciences Center for 15 years and has chaired many committees related to global change, including the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC), its Climate Research Committee, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Earth Observing System Science Executive Committee. Dr. Barron’s research interests are in climate modeling, hydrology, and Earth system history. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Meteorological Society. Roger C. Bales is a professor of hydrology and water resources in the School of Engineering at the University of California, Merced. His research interests focus on snow hydrology, hydrogeochemistry, water resources, and climate impacts. He was principal investigator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Climate Assessment for the Southwest Project, which examined the impacts of climate variability and longer-term climate change on human and natural systems in the Southwest. Dr. Bales is a former member of the NRC Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data and Committee on Hydrologic Studies. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Meteorological Society. John B. Carberry is director of environmental technology at the DuPont

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Thinking Strategically: The Appropriate Use of Metrics for the Climate Change Science Program Company. While his early career focused on developing chemical processes or new products, he is currently analyzing environmental issues of interest to his company to help set policy or develop business programs. In that capacity, he has formulated performance metrics for industrial ecology and presented them in a wide range of venues. He has also participated in a number of global change-related activities, including the mid-Atlantic assessment of the environment. Mr. Carberry has served on a number of committees dealing with performance metrics, most notably the NRC Committee on Industrial Environmental Performance Metrics and the American Institute for Chemical Engineering’s Sustainability Metrics Working Group. David J.C. Constable is director of sustainable development, environment, health and safety product stewardship, corporate environment, health, and safety at GlaxoSmithKline. In addition to his other duties, he is responsible for developing the company’s sustainability metrics. He has brought this expertise to the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, where he participated in or led a number of working groups developing sustainability metrics for industrial issues, such as energy, water usage, and pollutants. Dr. Constable also has experience working with government agencies and academia, mostly to advance state-of-the-art environmental technologies. Paul V. Desanker is an associate professor of geography at the Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on forest landscape management, the effects of land-use change on ecosystem processes, and the assessment of impacts and of adaptation to climate change. Much of his work concentrates on Africa, and he has served on numerous committees related to climate change on that continent. He is also a member of the United Nation’s Framework Convention on Climate Change Least Developed Countries Expert Group and of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC’s) Task Group on Climate Impacts Assessments. Marvin A. Geller is a professor of atmospheric sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research deals with atmospheric dynamics, middle and upper atmosphere, climate variability, and aeronomy. Dr. Geller has served on many national and international advisory committees on atmospheric science, the upper atmosphere, and near-space environment and is currently president of the Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics. He is a fellow of the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and a past president of AGU’s Atmospheric Sciences Section. Eileen E. Hofmann is a professor in the Department of Oceanography at Old Dominion University. Her research focuses on analysis and modeling

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Thinking Strategically: The Appropriate Use of Metrics for the Climate Change Science Program of biological and physical interactions in marine ecosystems. Dr. Hofmann has served on many ocean-related committees, including the NRC’s Ocean Studies Board, and has served as an officer for the Ocean Sciences Section of the American Geophysical Union. She currently chairs the International Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics Southern Ocean Planning Group and is member of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study Synthesis and Modeling Project. Henry D. Jacoby is a professor of management and co-director of the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He was formerly director of MIT’s Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research. Dr. Jacoby has made contributions to the study of policy and management in the areas of energy, natural resources, and environment. He has also served on a number of committees related to these topics, including the NRC Climate Impact Committee and the Office of Technology Assessment Committee on Alternative Energy R&D Strategies. Joyce E. Penner is a professor in the Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences and director of the Laboratory for Atmospheric Science and Environmental Research at the University of Michigan. Her research interests focus on cloud and aerosol interactions, interactions of atmospheric chemistry with climate, and model interpretation. Dr. Penner has chaired or been a member of numerous advisory committees related to atmospheric chemistry and global change. Examples include the ad hoc Steering Committee to develop a National Aerosol Climate Interactions Program Plan and the NRC Panel on Aerosol Forcing and Climate Change. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union. Eugene A. Rosa is a professor of sociology and the Edward R. Meyer Distinguished Professor of Natural Resource and Environmental Policy in the Thomas S. Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service at Washington State University. His current research focuses on two complementary topics: technological risk and global environmental change. Research activities associated with the latter include specifying the anthropogenic causes of carbon dioxide loads, historical relationships between greenhouse gases and societal well-being, the history of social thought on climate, and theories of environmental impact. Dr. Rosa is a member of the NRC Board on Radioactive Waste Management and the Committee to Review the U.S. Climate Chance Science Program. Susan E. Trumbore is a professor of Earth system science and director of the Center for Global Environmental Change Research and Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the University of California, Irvine.

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Thinking Strategically: The Appropriate Use of Metrics for the Climate Change Science Program Her research interests are in biogeochemistry and its application to ecology, soil biochemistry, and terrestrial carbon cycling. Dr. Trumbore was an author of the IPCC’s report on land use, land-use change, and forestry. She is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, a former president of its biogeochemistry section, and has served on AGU Committees on Global Environmental Change and Paleoceanography and Paleoclimatology. Karl K. Turekian is Sterling Professor of Geology and Geophysics and director (until January 1, 2004) of the Institute for Biospheric Studies at Yale University. He is also director of the Center for the Study of Global Change of that institute. His research focuses on applications of isotope geochemistry to marine, atmosphere, terrestrial, and hydrologic environments. He also has a long-standing interest in climate change and has been a member of many NRC committees concerned with that topic. Recent examples include the Committee on Global Change Research, the Ocean Studies Board, and the Water Science and Technology Board. Dr. Turekian is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Carl Wunsch is Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physical Oceanography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research focuses on ocean observing technologies, and the general circulation of the ocean and its implications for climate change. Dr. Wunsch has chaired a number of ocean science advisory groups, such as the NRC Ocean Studies Board and the International Steering Group for the World Ocean Circulation Experiment. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Society, a recipient of the American Geophysical Union’s Macelwane Award and Maurice Ewing Medal, and the American Meteorological Society’s Henry Stommel Medal. NRC Staff Anne M. Linn, senior program officer, has been with the NRC Board on Earth Sciences and Resources since 1993. In addition to staffing a wide variety of studies on geophysics, Earth observing systems, and data policy, she directs the U.S. World Data Center Coordination Office. She is also the secretary of the International Council for Science (ICSU) Panel on World Data Centers. Prior to joining the staff of the National Academies, Dr. Linn was a visiting scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and a postdoctoral geochemist at the University of California, Berkeley. She holds a Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an M.S. and B.S. in geology from Texas A&M University.