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Committee Biographies

U.S. COMMITTEE ON STRENGTHENING U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION ON NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION

Rose Gottemoeller (Chair) is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment, where she holds a joint appointment with the Russian and Eurasian Program and the Global Policy Program. A specialist on defense and nuclear issues in Russia and the other former Soviet states, Gottemoeller’s research at the endowment focuses on issues of nuclear security and stability, nonproliferation, and arms control. Before joining the endowment in October 2000, Gottemoeller was deputy undersecretary for defense nuclear nonproliferation in the U.S. Department of Energy. Previously, she served as the department’s assistant secretary for nonproliferation and national security, with responsibility for all nonproliferation cooperation with Russia and the Newly Independent States. She first joined the department in November 1997 as director of the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Before working at the Energy Department, Gottemoeller served for three years as deputy director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. From 1993 to 1994, she served on the National Security Council in the White House as director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Affairs, with responsibility for denuclearization in Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Belarus. Previously, she was a senior defense analyst at the RAND Corporation and a Council on Foreign Relations international affairs fellow. She has taught on Soviet military policy at Georgetown University and is currently teaching on Russian security in Eurasia, also at Georgetown University.


Major General William F. Burns is a distinguished fellow at the U.S. Army War College. General Burns brings his extensive experience in official positions within military and civilian government departments to the committee. His experience includes command of nuclear weapons military units in Europe and detailed negotiations with representatives of the former Soviet Union on nuclear arms control and reductions. General Burns was the ninth director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and the deputy assistant secretary of state for political-military affairs. He served as the first U.S. special envoy to the denuclearization negotiations with states of the former Soviet Union under the Nunn-Lugar Act, and he negotiated the government-to-government agreement on sales of highly enriched uranium from dismantled Soviet weapons to the United States. He is a member of the National Academies Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC), chaired its 1997 study The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy, and is a cochair of CISAC’s current project on verifying agreed reductions in nuclear warhead stockpiles. Gen. Burns brings expertise in nuclear arms control and military aspects of nuclear weapons to the committee.


Orde Kittrie is an associate professor at the Arizona State University (ASU) College of Law. Prior to joining the ASU law faculty in 2004, Professor Kittrie served for 11 years at the U.S. Department of State. His current teaching and research interests include homeland security law, law and technology, public international law, international economic and business law, international negotiations, and Middle East law and law reform. Kittrie most recently served as the State Department’s director of International Anti-Crime Programs, overseeing U.S. policy and technical assistance programs for promoting the rule of law and combating transnational crime worldwide, including corruption, money laundering, intellectual property piracy, cybercrime, and alien smuggling. Kittrie earlier served as a special assistant to the undersecretary of state for economic, business, and agricultural affairs. In that capacity, he worked on economic aid for Pakistan following the attacks of September 11, 2001, and assisted with planning for the reconstruction of Afghanistan. Kittrie has also served as the State Department’s senior attorney for nuclear affairs. In that capacity, he negotiated five nuclear nonproliferation agreements between the United



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Strengthening U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Nonproliferation: Recommendations for Action B Committee Biographies U.S. COMMITTEE ON STRENGTHENING U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION ON NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Rose Gottemoeller (Chair) is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment, where she holds a joint appointment with the Russian and Eurasian Program and the Global Policy Program. A specialist on defense and nuclear issues in Russia and the other former Soviet states, Gottemoeller’s research at the endowment focuses on issues of nuclear security and stability, nonproliferation, and arms control. Before joining the endowment in October 2000, Gottemoeller was deputy undersecretary for defense nuclear nonproliferation in the U.S. Department of Energy. Previously, she served as the department’s assistant secretary for nonproliferation and national security, with responsibility for all nonproliferation cooperation with Russia and the Newly Independent States. She first joined the department in November 1997 as director of the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security. Before working at the Energy Department, Gottemoeller served for three years as deputy director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London. From 1993 to 1994, she served on the National Security Council in the White House as director for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia Affairs, with responsibility for denuclearization in Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Belarus. Previously, she was a senior defense analyst at the RAND Corporation and a Council on Foreign Relations international affairs fellow. She has taught on Soviet military policy at Georgetown University and is currently teaching on Russian security in Eurasia, also at Georgetown University. Major General William F. Burns is a distinguished fellow at the U.S. Army War College. General Burns brings his extensive experience in official positions within military and civilian government departments to the committee. His experience includes command of nuclear weapons military units in Europe and detailed negotiations with representatives of the former Soviet Union on nuclear arms control and reductions. General Burns was the ninth director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and the deputy assistant secretary of state for political-military affairs. He served as the first U.S. special envoy to the denuclearization negotiations with states of the former Soviet Union under the Nunn-Lugar Act, and he negotiated the government-to-government agreement on sales of highly enriched uranium from dismantled Soviet weapons to the United States. He is a member of the National Academies Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC), chaired its 1997 study The Future of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Policy, and is a cochair of CISAC’s current project on verifying agreed reductions in nuclear warhead stockpiles. Gen. Burns brings expertise in nuclear arms control and military aspects of nuclear weapons to the committee. Orde Kittrie is an associate professor at the Arizona State University (ASU) College of Law. Prior to joining the ASU law faculty in 2004, Professor Kittrie served for 11 years at the U.S. Department of State. His current teaching and research interests include homeland security law, law and technology, public international law, international economic and business law, international negotiations, and Middle East law and law reform. Kittrie most recently served as the State Department’s director of International Anti-Crime Programs, overseeing U.S. policy and technical assistance programs for promoting the rule of law and combating transnational crime worldwide, including corruption, money laundering, intellectual property piracy, cybercrime, and alien smuggling. Kittrie earlier served as a special assistant to the undersecretary of state for economic, business, and agricultural affairs. In that capacity, he worked on economic aid for Pakistan following the attacks of September 11, 2001, and assisted with planning for the reconstruction of Afghanistan. Kittrie has also served as the State Department’s senior attorney for nuclear affairs. In that capacity, he negotiated five nuclear nonproliferation agreements between the United

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Strengthening U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Nonproliferation: Recommendations for Action States and Russia and served as counsel for the U.S. government’s sanctions and other responses to the 1998 Indian and Pakistani nuclear tests. Earlier in his State Department career, Kittrie specialized in trade controls governing arms and dual-use items, in which capacity he was a principal drafter of U.N. Security Council resolutions, U.S. executive orders, and U.S. regulations imposing and implementing arms embargoes on terrorism-supporting and other outlaw regimes, including Rwanda during the genocide. Kittrie is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a graduate of Yale University and the University of Michigan Law School. M. Teresa Olascoaga currently leads the Cooperative International Programs (CIP) Group, one of two International Security Center (ISC) groups at Sandia National Laboratories. She is also the former deputy director of the ISC. She manages a broad spectrum of programs focused on nuclear and biological nonproliferation, nuclear materials management, regional security, and arms control and leads the six CIP departments. Terri has 10 years of experience managing and leading U.S. nuclear security programs and strategic initiatives, particularly those with Russia, including the U.S. Department of Energy-National Nuclear Security Administration’s Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) program. She also has more than 15 years of domestic and international experience in managing and performing security system design, evaluation, technology/policy support, and training for various applications, including U.S Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, International Atomic Energy Agency, and North Atlantic Treaty Organization nuclear security and for commercial aviation security in the United States. Terri holds a B.S. degree in mathematics from New Mexico State University and an M.S. in industrial engineering from Columbia University. Daniel Poneman is principal at The Scowcroft Group, providing strategic advice to the Group clients in the energy, aerospace, information technology, and manufacturing industries, among others. For nine years he practiced law in Washington, D.C., assisting clients in a wide variety of regulatory and policy matters, including export controls, trade policy, and sanctions issues. From 1993 through 1996, Mr. Poneman served as special assistant to the president and senior director for nonproliferation and export controls at the National Security Council (NSC), with responsibilities for the development and implementation of U.S. policy in such areas as peaceful nuclear cooperation, missile technology and space-launch activities, sanctions determinations, chemical and biological arms control efforts, and conventional arms transfer policy. During that period, he participated in negotiations and consultations with governments in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the former Soviet Union. Mr. Poneman joined the NSC staff in 1990 as director of defense policy and arms control, after service in the U.S. Department of Energy. He has served as a member of the Commission to Assess the Organization of the Federal Government to Combat the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, as well as other federal advisory panels. He received A.B. and J.D. degrees from Harvard University and an M.Litt. in politics from Oxford University. Mr. Poneman is the author of books on nuclear energy policy, Korea, and Argentina and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. William H. Press is senior laboratory fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. From 1998 to 2004 he served as the Laboratory’s deputy director for science and technology, sharing responsibility for all aspects of managing a research and development organization with an annual budget of $2.0 billion and about 12,000 employees. His responsibilities at times included relations with governmental sponsors and congressional liason; resource allocation; community and tribal relations; environment, safety, and health; and workforce issues (particularly those affecting the Laboratory’s 4,000 technical staff members). While deputy director, Press was responsible for ensuring the scientific quality of the Laboratory’s technical programs. He was directly responsible for the strategic allocation of all internal research and development funds (about $107 million in fiscal year 2004); oversaw institutional initiatives on technical staff recruitment and retention; chartered and appointed more than 25 outside review committees for the Laboratory’s divisions; guided the Laboratory’s relationship in academic matters with its parent institution, the University of California; and had line management responsibility for functions such as student and postdoctoral programs, the research library, the office of the chief information officer, and the Laboratory’s projectized work (some $200 million) in the national Spallation Neutron Source project. Before going to Los Alamos in 1998, Press was professor of astronomy and of physics at Harvard University. At the time of his arrival there in 1976, he was its youngest tenured professor. Subsequently, he served as chairman of the Department of Astronomy. Earlier, Press was assistant professor of physics at Princeton University, and Richard Chace Tolman Research Fellow in Theoretical Physics at Caltech, where he received a Ph.D. in physics in 1972. His undergraduate degree was from Harvard in 1969. Press, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, has published more than 140 papers in the areas of theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, and computational algorithms. RUSSIAN COMMITTEE ON STRENGTHENING U.S.-RUSSIAN COOPERATION ON NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION Vice Admiral Ashot Arakelovich Sarkisov (Chair) is academician, advisor to the Russian Academy of Sciences, and

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Strengthening U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Nonproliferation: Recommendations for Action head of the Division of Applied Problems of Nuclear Power of the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Nuclear Safety Institute. The scientific achievements of Academician Sarkisov lie in the fields of shipboard and stationary nuclear power safety, radioactive waste management, and energy-related ecological problems. He has led and personally participated in many theoretical and experimental studies on various aspects involved in ensuring the safety of complex modern technical systems. His projects have included the development of mathematical models of transient and emergency regimes of ship nuclear power facilities, studies of the effects of high-power shocks on thermohydrodynamic and neutron processes in facilities with boiling nuclear reactors, studies of accidents associated with breaks in primary circuit pipelines at nuclear facilities, studies of the safety of underground nuclear power plants, and the development of thermoelectric generators installed in the active zone of nuclear reactors. In the past 10 years, Academician Sarkisov has initiated and led large-scale systems studies on problems involved in the disposition and environmental rehabilitation of Russian nuclear naval vessels and facilities. His most recent major study focuses on the development of the Strategic Master Plan for Naval Disposition in the Northwest region of the Russian Federation. This work is being carried out under a contract from the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development within the scope of an agreement made at the 2002 G-8 Summit in Kananaskis, Canada, on providing aid to the Russian Federation in eliminating the vestiges of the Cold War. On four occasions (1955, 1957, 2002, and 2004), Academician Sarkisov has served as Russian cochair of international conferences on various problems of the disposition of nuclear submarines that have been held in Moscow within the framework of the Russia-North Atlantic Treaty Organization partnership. He serves as chair of the Expert Council on Naval and Shipbuilding Problems of the Higher Attestation Commission of the Russian Federation, chair of the Expert Council on the International Russian-American Scientific-Technical Program of the International Science and Technology Center, and deputy chair of the Scientific Council on Atomic Energy of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also a member of a number of other scientific councils and editorial boards of various scientific journals. Currently a professor and doctor of technical sciences, Academician Sarkisov received his pregraduate education at the Leningrad Higher Naval Engineering College and Leningrad University. He is the author of more than 200 scientific works, including several monographs and many books. A participant in the Great Patriotic War from 1941 to 1945, he has been awarded nine orders and many medals. Evgeny Nikolaevich Avrorin is scientific director of the Zababakhin Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Institute of Technical Physics (ZRFNC-VNIITF), in Snezhinsk (Chelyabinsk-70). His primary research accomplishments involve the area of high-energy-density physics and include matter properties study, including the EQS and opacities at extreme conditions (super-high pressure and temperature), the development of nuclear explosive devices for peaceful application, basic investigation on physics under nuclear explosions, high-velocity impact physics, ICF physics, and X-ray laser physics. Dr. Avrorin has also worked on applied problems of nuclear power engineering, the nonproliferation and control of nuclear weapon technology, and environmental monitoring and remediation. During the time of nuclear test experiments (1956 to 1989), he led and participated in the theoretical and experimental basic research performed at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIITF (Chelyabinsk-70, Russia). That research involved the measurement of equations of state at pressures up to a billion atmospheres, investigations of polymorphous phase changes at shock load, the study of phenomena of high-speed shock, the study of hydrodynamic instability and turbulent mixing, the measurement of energy absorption by matter at temperatures up to 10 million degrees, the study of the processes of thermonuclear burning and thermonuclear detonation, and the simulation of the targets for inertial confinement fusion. Dr. Avrorin studied physics at Moscow State University and received a Ph.D. and a Sc.D. from RFNC-VNIITF (Chelyabinsk-70). In 1963, he was awarded the Lenin Prize. Valery Ivanovich Rachkov is head of the Nuclear Power Department in the Federal Atomic Energy Agency of the Russian Federation. Dr. Rachkov is author of more than 150 scientific papers, 2 of which are monographs; is a member of the editorial board of Nuclear Power magazine and the Rosatom Scientific and Engineering Board on Nuclear Reactors, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Economics; he is also a member of several Russian Academy of Sciences Steering Committees. In 1999 Dr. Rachkov was appointed leader of nuclear power development strategy activities. The Strategy of Nuclear Power Development in Russia in the First Half of the XXI Century was developed under his leadership. Dr. Rachkov graduated from Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute (MIFI) in 1971 and holds a Ph.D. Vladimir I. Rybachenkov has worked in industry developing computerized scientific and technical information systems and since 1993 has served as a counselor at the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (Department for Security and Disarmament, Nonproliferation and Nuclear International Cooperation Division); he currently serves as counselor at the Russian Embassy in Washington, D.C. In this capacity, his sphere of responsibilities includes international cooperation in the field of excess weapons fissile material management, bilateral nuclear cooperation, Material Protection, Control and Accounting program, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities. He took part in Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty nego-

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Strengthening U.S.-Russian Cooperation on Nuclear Nonproliferation: Recommendations for Action tiations, and participated in Nuclear Cities Initiative negotiations as well as in the development of new arrangements for the Russian-American Highly Enriched Uranium–Low Enriched Uranium agreement. From 1994 to 1997 Dr. Rybachenkov participated in the development of the Guidelines for Management of Plutonium (published as an IAEA information circular). Since 1993 he has been a member of Russian delegations to the IAEA regular sessions of the board of governors and the general conference. Dr. Rybachenkov has made presentations at different international fora, including Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (Oxford, 1997; Geneva, 1999; Munich, 1999); Disposition of Excess Weapon-Grade Plutonium (Berlin, 1995; Boston, 1997; Washington, 1999, 2000, 2001); Monitoring of nuclear warhead dismantlement (Washington, D.C., 1998); Helping Russia Downsize Its Nuclear Weapons Complex (Princeton, 2000; Como, Italy, 2001); and The Missile Threat and Plans for Ballistic Missile Defense: Impact on Global Security (Rome, 2001). Dr. Rybachenkov graduated from the Moscow Engineering-Physics Institute and holds a Ph.D. in technical sciences. Emilia V. Sidorova is an attaché at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation in the Department for Security Affairs and Disarmament of the Nuclear Security and Nonproliferation Division. She speaks fluent English and Swedish and has worked for the Russian Academy of Public Administration and the Moscow State Institute of International Relations, specializing in international relations.