C
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Staff, and Working Group Members

COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF

Mark R. Wilson (Chair) is a professor of policy, organization, measurement, and evaluation cognition and development in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a convenor of the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center. His research focuses on educational measurement, survey sampling techniques, modeling, and assessment design. He is currently advising the California State Department of Education on assessment issues as a member of the Technical Study Group. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in measurement and educational statistics from the University of Chicago.

J. Myron Atkin is professor emeritus of education and human biology at Stanford University, where he specializes in science curriculum and teaching. A former science teacher at the elementary and secondary school levels, he focuses on innovations in science education in the United States and other countries, as well as teachers’ roles in formulating educational policy for curriculum and teaching, including assessment and evaluation. His publications include Everyday Assessment in the Science Classroom (with Coffey), Inside Science Education Reform: A History of Curricular and Policy Change (with Black), and Changing the Subject: Innovations in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education (with Black). He has served on several National Research Council committees, including Assessment in Support of Instruction and Learning: Bridging the Gap Between Large-Scale and Classroom Assessment; Science Education K–12; and Next Steps in



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Systems for State Science Assessment C Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Staff, and Working Group Members COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND STAFF Mark R. Wilson (Chair) is a professor of policy, organization, measurement, and evaluation cognition and development in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a convenor of the Berkeley Evaluation and Assessment Research Center. His research focuses on educational measurement, survey sampling techniques, modeling, and assessment design. He is currently advising the California State Department of Education on assessment issues as a member of the Technical Study Group. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in measurement and educational statistics from the University of Chicago. J. Myron Atkin is professor emeritus of education and human biology at Stanford University, where he specializes in science curriculum and teaching. A former science teacher at the elementary and secondary school levels, he focuses on innovations in science education in the United States and other countries, as well as teachers’ roles in formulating educational policy for curriculum and teaching, including assessment and evaluation. His publications include Everyday Assessment in the Science Classroom (with Coffey), Inside Science Education Reform: A History of Curricular and Policy Change (with Black), and Changing the Subject: Innovations in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education (with Black). He has served on several National Research Council committees, including Assessment in Support of Instruction and Learning: Bridging the Gap Between Large-Scale and Classroom Assessment; Science Education K–12; and Next Steps in

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Systems for State Science Assessment Education Research, Practice, and Progress: Strategic Planning at the National Academies. He has a Ph.D. in science education from New York University. Meryl W. Bertenthal (Study Director) is a senior program officer in the Board on Testing and Assessment of the National Research Council. Previously, she served as a senior research associate with the Committee on Equivalency and Linkage of Educational Tests and the Board on Testing and Assessment. She also served as a senior program officer with the Committee on Programs for Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in American High Schools and as study director for the Committee on Assessment in Support of Instruction and Learning. Before joining the NRC staff she worked in public education as a teacher and as a curriculum and instructional supervisor. Her areas of interest include student assessment, educational reform, and education policy. She has an M.A.Ed from Clark University and completed a post master’s degree program in counseling education at the University of Virginia. Audrey B. Champagne is a professor in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice in the School of Education and in the Department of Chemistry in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University at Albany, State University of New York. She also serves as coprincipal investigator of the Students’ Construction of Scientific and Mathematical Explanations Project and of the local systemic initiative, Assessment in the Service of Learning. Previously, she served as a senior scientist and project director of the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Her involvement in U.S. and international activities in the assessment of science achievement has included membership on advisory committees for the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. She is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She participated in the development of the National Science Education Standards and served as chair of the National Research Council’s Working Group on Science Assessment Standards. Champagne is a member of the planning committee charged with the design of the 2006 NAEP Science Framework. She has a Ph.D. in science education from the University of Pittsburgh. David N. Figlio is the Knight-Ridder professor of economics at the University of Florida and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He also serves as associate of the Institute for Research on Poverty and has previously served on the faculty at the University of Oregon. His work focuses on education and public finance and includes investigations of the quality of public and private schools and the relationship between teacher pay and teacher quality. He has also worked in Chile, Sweden, Tanzania, Thailand, and other countries to help design and evaluate school policies. His work on school accountability and education policy has been published or is forthcoming in the American Economic Review, the

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Systems for State Science Assessment Journal of Public Economics, the Journal of Law and Economics, and the Journal of Urban Economics, and as chapters in books. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Gregory B. Hall is the assistant superintendent for assessment and research for the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction for the state of Washington. Previously, he served as assistant director for achievement testing and an assessment specialist in the department of education of the Province of Alberta in Canada. He has also served as a principal of a grade K–9 school and as a teacher of science, physics, and mathematics in Alberta’s public school system. His post-secondary teaching and workshop leadership across the United States have focused on the topics of developing classroom and performance assessments, particularly for use in improving student learning. He has a B.S. in physics and a B.E. in science, both from the University of Alberta. Joan Herman is codirector of the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing at the University of California, Los Angeles. Her research has explored the effects of testing on schools and the design of information systems to support school planning and instructional improvement. Her recent work has focused on the validity and utility of alternative forms of assessment, with particular emphasis on opportunity to learn and portfolio assessment, as well as evaluation of technology and school reform. A former teacher, she has served in leadership positions with both the California Educational Research Association and the American Educational Research Association. Her numerous publications include Tracking Your School’s Success: A Guide to Sensible School-Based Evaluation and A Practical Guide to Alternative Assessment. She has an Ed.D. in learning and instruction from the University of California, Los Angeles. Heinrich D. Holland is Harry C. Dudley research professor of economic geology at Harvard University in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. His research interests include the chemistry of the atmosphere and oceans, particularly the controls on atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide and on the composition of seawater; the chemical evolution of the atmosphere and oceans, particularly the evolution of the oxygen and carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere and of the major cations and anions in seawater; the origin and composition of ore-forming fluids and the formation of hydrothermal ore deposits; and the chemical contamination of the atmosphere, rivers, and lakes. He has taught science in the elementary grades, has served on school committees in New Jersey and Massachusetts, and has been active in education issues at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Associateship Programs Advisory Committee and panels on Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and Geochemical Cycles. He has a Ph.D. in geology from Columbia University.

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Systems for State Science Assessment Joseph Krajcik is professor of educational studies in the School of Education at the University of Michigan and a member of the Center for Highly Interactive Classrooms, Curriculum and Computing in Education. He works with teachers in science classrooms to bring about sustained change by creating classrooms in which students collaborate to find solutions to important intellectual questions that subsume essential curriculum standards and use new technologies as productivity tools. He also seeks to discover what students learn in such environments, as well as to explore challenges that teachers face in enacting such complex instruction. With colleagues he is designing and testing the next generation of middle school curriculum materials to engage students in developing deep understandings of science content and practices. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has served as president of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching and as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation, as well as many professional journals. His National Research Council service has included membership on the Department of Education OERI Visiting Scholars Review Panel and the Ford Foundation Minority Postdoctoral Review Panel on Education. He has a Ph.D. in science education from the University of Iowa. Suzanne Lane is a professor of research methodology in education in the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests focus on measurement issues, including the technical quality and validity of large-scale assessments and performance-based assessments, item response models for test design, and generalizability theory. She has directed research on the consequences of the Maryland State Performance Assessment Program and directed the assessment division of the project Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reasoning (QUASAR). She was president for the National Council of Measurement in Education and vice president for Division D of the American Educational Research Association. She has served as consultant to the American Institutes for Research, the College Board, the Educational Testing Service, and the Delaware, Kentucky, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania departments of education. She has a Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of Arizona. Richard Lehrer is a professor at Vanderbilt University in the Peabody College Department of Teaching and Learning, and coeditor of Cognition and Instruction. Previously he worked at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he was associate director of the National Center for Improving Student Learning and Achievement in Mathematics and Science. He collaborates with teachers to craft, implement, and assess modeling of mathematics and sciences in the elementary grades. He has also formulated innovative geometry instruction for primary- and elementary-grade students that is guided by longitudinal study of student thinking about space. He is a former high school science teacher and has pioneered

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Systems for State Science Assessment classroom research that investigates cognitive technologies as tools for thought in mathematics, science, and literacy. He has served as a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Foundations of Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in educational psychology and statistics from the University of New York, Albany. Sharon Lewis is director of research for the Council of the Great City Schools, where she is responsible for developing and maintaining a research program that articulates the status, needs, attributes, operation, and challenges of urban public schools and their students. She previously served in the Detroit Public Schools as assistant superintendent for the Department of Research, Development and Co-ordination and as director of the Office of Research, Evaluation and Testing. She has also served as an international education consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense Dependents Schools and as a Michigan delegate to the Soviet Union and the People’s Republic of China. Her National Research Council service has included membership on the Board on International Comparative Studies in Education, the Committee on the Evaluation of National and State Assessments of Educational Progress, and the Committee on Appropriate Uses of Educational Testing. She has an M.A. in educational research from Wayne State University. James W. Pellegrino is distinguished college professor in psychology and education and codirector of the Center for the Study of Learning, Instruction, and Teacher Development, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Previously, he served as the Frank W. Mayborn professor of cognitive studies and dean of the Peabody College of Education at Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on human cognition, cognitive development, individual differences, and applications of cognitive research and technology to instructional and assessment design issues. His National Research Council service includes the Panel on Learning and Instruction (chair), the Committee on the Foundations of Assessment (cochair), the Committee on the Evaluation of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (chair), the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice (cochair), the Board on Testing and Assessment, and the Committee on Improving Learning with Information Technology. He has a Ph.D. in experimental and quantitative psychology from the University of Colorado. Brian Stecher is a senior social scientist in the education program at the RAND Corporation. His research focuses on the development, implementation, quality, and impact of educational assessment and curriculum reforms. His current work includes two large-scale studies of the implementation of standards-based accountability. He has directed research on the impact of class size reduction, the effects of state assessment systems on classroom practices, the relationship between mathematics and science teaching reforms and student achievement, and the use of performance-based assessments in large-scale testing programs. He recently served as a member of the National Research Council’s Steering Com-

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Systems for State Science Assessment mittee for the Workshop on Taking Stock of the National Science Education Standards: The Research. He has a Ph.D. in education from the University of California, Los Angeles. Gerald M. Stokes is the director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaborative enterprise of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. Previously he served in several positions at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and as the chief scientist of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program at the U.S. Department of Energy. A fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, he has served as president of the board of the Columbia River Exposition of History, Science, and Technology and as a member of the board of the Association for the Advancement of Science through Astronomy. His primary research interests include climate and the design of large-scale field research facilities. His National Research Council service includes membership on the Committee on Support for Thinking Spatially: The Incorporation of Geographic Information Science Across the K–12 Curriculum and the National Committee on Science Education Standards and Assessment. He has a Ph.D. in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of Chicago. Rachel Wood is currently serving as head of school at the Alternative School for Math and Science, and her additional responsibilities include teaching science to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders. Prior to assuming this role, she was education associate at the Science Resources Center of the Delaware Department of Education, where she served as state science supervisor with the responsibility for leading implementation of its science standards. Her previous responsibility had been as cochair of the Delaware Department of Education Science Curriculum Framework Commission to develop the elementary and secondary science standards, after serving as a junior and senior high school science teacher. She has led the state of Delaware’s efforts to create a comprehensive assessment program. Her National Research Council service includes membership on the Committee on Science Education K–12, the Committee on Classroom Assessment and the National Science Education Standards, and the Working Group on Teaching Evolution. She has a B.S. in biology and an M.S. in earth science from Salisbury University. WORKING GROUP MEMBERS Amitabha Basu is a teacher of biology and science at George Washington Carver High School of Engineering and Science in Philadelphia. He has also recently served as an adjunct lecturer in ecology at Drexel University, a consultant and lecturer in the biotechnology laboratory technician program of the Community College of Philadelphia and The Wistar Institute, and a consultant to the science

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Systems for State Science Assessment and technology curriculum committee of the Pennsylvania Department of Education. In Bangalore, India, he served as scientific officer and faculty in the field of biological electron microscopy at the Indian Institute of Science. He has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Calcutta and an M.S. in education from Drexel University, where he is working toward a Ph.D. in environmental science. Conni Crittenden is a teacher at Williamston Explorer Elementary School in Williamston, Michigan, where she established and directs the McAuliffe Lab for the Integration of Science, Math, and the Arts for kindergarten through fifth-grade students. Throughout the district and the state, she has served as a mentor teacher, science consultant, and chair of elementary and K–12 science, and has developed and provided professional development activities for teachers. In the College of Education at Michigan State University, she teaches a course for intern teachers on teaching for understanding. Her awards include a McAuliffe Fellow-ship and the Presidential Award for Excellence in Elementary Science Teaching, and she has participated with other presidential award recipients in workshops sponsored by the Space and Rocket Center Education Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. She has an M.S. in fisheries and wildlife– environmental education from Michigan State University. Diane Hernandez is the science consultant in the Standards and Assessment Division of the California Department of Education. Her responsibilities center on the planning, development, implementation, monitoring, reporting, and evaluation of the science tests required by or administered through the Standardized Testing and Reporting Program, the Golden State Exams, the National Assessment of Educational Progress, and the No Child Left Behind Act. Previously she served as a teacher of mathematics and science at various grade levels. She has also served as a national consultant and facilitator for the Activities Integrating Math and Science Education Foundation. She has an M.A. in mathematics and science with emphasis on curriculum and instruction from Fresno Pacific University. Hector Ibarra is a teacher of science at West Branch Middle School, in West Branch, Iowa. His teaching approaches include field-based research and encouraging student involvement in the community. His numerous awards include Fulbright Study Abroad in Japan and Russia, as well as the Presidential Science Teaching Award, a Christa McAuliffe fellowship, the Milken National Educator Award, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Educators’ Environmental Excellence Award. He has served as president of both the National Association of Presidential Awardees in Science Teaching and the National Middle Level Science Teachers Association. He has an M.S. in science education with emphasis in geology from the University of Iowa and has completed course work toward a Ph.D. there.

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Systems for State Science Assessment Linda Jordan is the science coordinator at the Tennessee Department of Education. Previously she served as a high school teacher of biology, chemistry, and ecology, as well as a middle school teacher of physical science. She has provided national, state, and regional leadership for science educators by numerous means, including the Council of State Science Supervisors (executive board), the Tennessee Science Teachers Association (executive board), and the Appalachian Educational Laboratory Eisenhower Math/Science Consortium (regional steering committee). She has an M.S. in science education and an educational specialist degree, both from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Thomas E. Keller is a science specialist and regional education services team member at the Maine Department of Education. He has also served as an instructor in the College of Education at the University of Southern Maine and as a high school science teacher, as well as president of the Council of State Science Supervisors. He has worked to align local comprehensive assessment systems with state standards, make teacher certification more standards-based, and help school districts to integrate curriculum programs and instructional materials with state and national standards and assessments. His service with the National Research Council includes membership on the Committee on Science Education and the Committee on Assessment in Support of Instruction and Learning: Bridging the Gap Between Large-Scale and Classroom Assessment. He has an Ed.D. in teacher preparation and curriculum studies from the University of Massachusetts. Shelley A. Lee is the science education consultant in the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. She facilitates development of the state science academic content standards as well as the Wisconsin Student Assessment System in science with the assessment division and a commercial testing company. In addition, she conducts item and data analysis, assists school districts with making decisions about local curriculum and programs, and provides interpretations about the state science academic standards. Previously she served as a ninth-grade science teacher and as president of the National Science Teachers Association. Her publications include Beyond 2000—Teachers of Science Speak Out. She has a B.S. in education from Southeastern Oklahoma State University and is doing course work toward a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. Patricia LeGrand is a teacher at Guilford County Middle College High School in Jamestown, North Carolina. Previously, with Enterprise City Schools in Alabama, she served as the science department chair, and while teaching at Dudley High School and with Greensboro City Schools, she taught academically gifted science and advanced placement chemistry as well as general chemistry. She has received awards in recognition of her teaching and is a national board-certified teacher who shares her strategies for success and leads efforts to improve instruction. Her doctoral research involved reaching and teaching capable, yet poorly performing

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Systems for State Science Assessment students. She has an Ed.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Shelley Loving-Ryder is assistant superintendent for assessment and reporting at the Virginia Department of Education. Previously she coordinated testing in the Virginia Department of Education, which included criterion-referenced and norm-referenced programs, as well as the National Assessment of Educational Progress. She has also taught high school mathematics. She has an M.S. degree in psychology from the University of Richmond and has done doctoral study in clinical psychology at the Virginia Commonwealth University. John McKinney is a teacher of earth science at Mountain Ridge Middle School in Colorado. He uses research-based practices, data collection, and assessment methods, as well as creative instruction, and has been involved in writing district standards, developing district-wide performance assessments in science, and creating interesting curricula that meet district standards. He is a master teacher and curriculum textbook author and has received numerous awards for excellence and leadership in science education, including a Milken National Educator of the Year Award for teaching. He has an M.S. in earth sciences from the University of Northern Colorado. Valdine McLean is a teacher of physics, chemistry, biology, and student leadership at Pershing County High School in Lovelock, Nevada. She has served in such leadership roles as president of the Nevada State Science Teachers Association and as a presenter and facilitator for workshops with a technology focus. Her innovative teaching style seeks to serve all children and has been recognized by several awards, including Master Teacher of the Year from the National Teacher Training Institute, Nevada Teacher of the Year, the state and national Presidential Award for Mathematics and Science Teaching, and the national Teaching Excellence Award from the Horace-Mann and National Education Association Foundation for Improving Education. She is a member of the National Research Council’s Teacher Advisory Council. She has a B.S. in biology from Humboldt State University and is working toward an M.S. in science education. Herman W. Meyers is associate professor in the Department of Education at the University of Vermont, where he has also held the position of department chair. Previously he was deputy commissioner of the Vermont State Department of Education (2000–2004). His other University of Vermont responsibilities have included directing the design and management of field-based, preservice and in-service teacher education in the Teacher Corps Projects. His research projects and evaluations have included study of the extent of gender and family background equity in school outcomes, a project to attract minority students to teacher education, evaluations of Mathematics and Science Partnership programs for Ver-

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Systems for State Science Assessment mont and Massachusetts, and the first implementation year of the Vermont assessment system. He has a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Connecticut. Brett Moulding is the state science specialist for the Utah State Office of Education. He provides leadership and direction for science education policy and programs, including development and implementation of Utah’s Science Core Curriculum, the Core Science Assessment, and statewide science professional development of K–12 teachers. Previously he was a high school chemistry teacher and received the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. He is president-elect of the Council of State Science Supervisors and serves as a member of the science advisory committee of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He has an M.A. in education with emphasis on science from Weber State University. Pat Roschewski is the director of statewide assessment at the Nebraska Department of Education. Previously she served in a school district as director of curriculum as well as in other administrative positions, and during most of that time also served as a teacher, primarily in a middle school classroom. She has also worked at the district level with classroom- and school-based assessment systems. Her doctoral dissertation was entitled “Promising Practices, Processes and Leadership Strategies in Building Quality Local Assessment.” She has a Ph.D. in curriculum and administration from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Carol A. Shestok is the K–5 science coordinator of curriculum and instruction and mentor training coordinator of the Westford Public School System in Westford, Massachusetts. She has served as an elementary school teacher, an instructor at Fitchburg State College, a member of the Massachusetts Science Curriculum Frameworks and the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment Development committees, and a national board certification national standards delegate to Australia, New Zealand, and the People’s Republic of China. She has received the Presidential Award in Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching and the Environmental Educator Award of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. She has an M.Ed. from Kutztown University and is studying for a Ph.D. in leadership and schooling at the University of Massachusetts. Ann Smisko (retired) served as the associate commissioner for curriculum, assessment, and technology at the Texas Education Agency, where she provided leadership and oversight to the areas of curriculum, student assessment, advanced academic services, textbook administration, and educational technology. She has been responsible for developing and implementing the state assessment program, including the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills, instructional materials adoptions, and educational technology to ensure alignment with the Texas Essen-

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Systems for State Science Assessment tial Knowledge and Skills assessment. She has worked in formulating education policy as well as in special education, school support services, governmental relations, and professional staff development. She has served as a supervisor of student teachers at Boston College and as a teacher of students with disabilities at the Perkins School and the Boston Public Schools. She has a Ph.D. in education administration from the University of Texas, Austin. C. Scott Trimble (retired) served as the associate commissioner in the Office of Assessment and Accountability of the Kentucky Department of Education. Previously he served in the Kentucky Department of Education’s Office of Curriculum Assessment and Accountability as director of the Division of Assessment Implementation. He also served in the Office of Research and Planning as director of the Division of Evaluation, director of the Testing Unit, and education research analyst in the Division of Research. He has an M.A. in international and comparative education from Michigan State University. Marsha Winegarner is a K–12 science program specialist and consultant in the Bureau of Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment of the Florida Department of Education, where she provides leadership in state initiatives in curriculum, standards, and professional development. Previously she served as a high school science teacher, as well as a Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program delegate to Japan, a participant in the Leadership Institute of the National Research Council, and a teaching fellow at the Research Science Institute, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of California, and George Washington University. Her honors include the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science Teaching. She has an M.A. in zoology from the University of South Florida.