intergenerational perpetuation of disadvantage among Hispanics that would result from limiting the opportunities of future generations—a demographic penalty exemplified by the high incarceration rates among U.S.-born Hispanic youth with less than a high school education compared with their foreign-born counterparts.18

Notwithstanding uncertainty about future immigration flows and macroeconomic conditions, what is certain is that the current educational profile of Hispanics will undermine their long-term economic, social, and physical well-being and diminish their prospects for social integration and civic engagement. Given the projected growth of the Hispanic population over the next quarter century, compromising the future economic prospects of Hispanics by underinvesting in their education will likely compromise the nation’s future as well.

NOTES

1  

U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2003.

2  

Passel, 2004.

3  

Passel, 2004.

4  

Duncan et al., 2006.

5  

Schneider et al., 2006.

6  

Russell, 2005.

7  

Citing a December 2003 Nielson study, HispanTelligence Market Brief reports that only 11 percent of the total TV households in the top 16 Hispanic states are Spanish-language dominant, while almost 21 percent of the total TV households in these same states are Hispanic.

8  

A recent Pew Hispanic Center report claims that Hispanics’ views on many topics are influenced by the language in which they obtain news. See Suro, 2004.

9  

Hispanic Business Magazine Staff, 2005.

10  

Bean and Tienda, 1987. A distinction is made between symbolic ethnicity and minority status to describe Cubans on the one hand and Mexicans and Puerto Ricans on the other.

11  

Levy and Murnane, 2004:42.

12  

Carnevale, 1999.

13  

Duncan et al., 2006. Calculations by V. Joseph Hotz based on employment, earnings, and school differentials.

14  

Longman, 2004, points out that because Mexican fertility rates have dropped so dramatically, the country is now aging five times more rapidly than the United States.

15  

Longman, 2004.

16  

Plyler v. Doe, 1982, No. 80-1538, 628 F.22 448, and No. 80-1934, affirmed.

17  

Rumbaut, 2005.

18  

Rumbaut, 2005.



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