of the labor market participation of the youthful Hispanic population, as well as Hispanics’ social and economic future, will be compromised by underinvestment in the education of their second generation.

NOTES

1  

U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2005. This estimate does not include the 4 million residents of Puerto Rico, although they are U.S. citizens.

2  

Given a choice, migrants from Latin America overwhelmingly prefer to self-identify by country of origin, but if forced to choose between the two panethnic terms, they prefer “Hispanic” to “Latino” by a margin of three to one. “Black” and “white,” as used herein, refer to non-Hispanic African Americans/blacks and whites.

3  

There are areas in which data are emerging that the report does not cover; criminal justice, religion, and the military are three such examples. The panel considered these topics but decided that the research base was inadequate to build strong conclusions.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement