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TABLE 3 Fractionation of Radionuclides at the Mayak Production Association

Year of Operation

Volume of High-Level Wastes Processed (m3)

Specific Activity of High-Level Wastes (Ci/dm3)

Cs-Sr Concentrate Extracted × 106 Ci

Transplutonium and Rare Earth Elements Extracted

α-activity × 103 Ci

β-activity × 103 Ci

1996

210

32.4

7.5

1998

95

20.0

4.8

1999

62

20.3

1.5

1.9

37.3

2000

276

27.3

6.8

125.8

313.8

2001

586

27.0

16.112

290.2

970

Total

1229

36.712

417.9

1320.8

CONCLUSION

In implementing even the temporary storage of wastes, we representatives of today’s nuclear power industry can by no means sit by peacefully with our hands folded. We must discuss this problem more widely, collaborate more closely, and seek alternative new technologies—and having reached a decision, we must act. Let us act together!

I would like to note the need to expand scientific-technical and commercial cooperation among nuclear countries with regard to the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes. In this regard, the creation of major international complexes for storing and reprocessing spent fuel and possibly manufacturing new fuel and recycling radioactive wastes should be based on existing enterprises that have the necessary technologies and, most importantly, the experience—for example, such enterprises as the radiochemical plants in France and Great Britain and the industrial enterprises of Minatom.



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