APPENDIX B
SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES

David Allison, Ph.D.

David Allison, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics and Head of the Section on Statistical Genetics Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Associate Director of the NIH-funded Clinical Nutrition Research Center. He has authored over 250 scientific publications and edited three books. He has won several awards, including the 2002 Lilly Scientific Achievement Award from the North American Association for the Study of Obesity and the 2002 Andre Mayer Award from the International Association for the Study of Obesity. H holds several NIH and NSF grants, served on the Council of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity from 1995 to 2001, and has been a member of the Board of Trustees for the International Life Science Institute, North America, since January 2002. Dr. Allison serves on the editorial boards of Obesity Reviews, Nutrition Today, International Journal of Eating Disorders, International Journal of Obesity, Behavior Genetics, and Human Heredity. Dr. Allison’s research interests include obesity, quantitative genetics, clinical trials, and statistical and research methodology

Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P

Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P., has been Executive Director of the American Public Health Association (APHA) since December 2002. Prior to joining APHA, Dr. Benjamin was Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing the state's bioterrorism plan. From 1995-1999 he served as Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services. Dr. Benjamin has also worked extensively in the field of emergency medicine. He was Chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, WA; Chief of Emergency Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and Chair of the Community Health and Ambulatory Care Department at the District of Columbia General Hospital. From 1990-1991 he served as the District of Columbia's Commissioner of Public Health. He has taught emergency medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a former Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Benjamin has held a variety of positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians, including President and Vice President of the DC chapter, Chair of the Injury Control committee, member of the Governmental Affairs Committee, and member of the Health Policy Committee. He also served as President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (2001-2002) and has sat on the editorial board of the Journal of the National Medical Association.

Steven N. Blair, P.E.D.



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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary APPENDIX B SPEAKER BIOSKETCHES David Allison, Ph.D. David Allison, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics and Head of the Section on Statistical Genetics Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and Associate Director of the NIH-funded Clinical Nutrition Research Center. He has authored over 250 scientific publications and edited three books. He has won several awards, including the 2002 Lilly Scientific Achievement Award from the North American Association for the Study of Obesity and the 2002 Andre Mayer Award from the International Association for the Study of Obesity. H holds several NIH and NSF grants, served on the Council of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity from 1995 to 2001, and has been a member of the Board of Trustees for the International Life Science Institute, North America, since January 2002. Dr. Allison serves on the editorial boards of Obesity Reviews, Nutrition Today, International Journal of Eating Disorders, International Journal of Obesity, Behavior Genetics, and Human Heredity. Dr. Allison’s research interests include obesity, quantitative genetics, clinical trials, and statistical and research methodology Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P Georges C. Benjamin, M.D., F.A.C.P., has been Executive Director of the American Public Health Association (APHA) since December 2002. Prior to joining APHA, Dr. Benjamin was Secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, where he played a key role in developing the state's bioterrorism plan. From 1995-1999 he served as Deputy Secretary for Public Health Services. Dr. Benjamin has also worked extensively in the field of emergency medicine. He was Chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, WA; Chief of Emergency Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and Chair of the Community Health and Ambulatory Care Department at the District of Columbia General Hospital. From 1990-1991 he served as the District of Columbia's Commissioner of Public Health. He has taught emergency medicine at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, MD. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a former Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Dr. Benjamin has held a variety of positions with the American College of Emergency Physicians, including President and Vice President of the DC chapter, Chair of the Injury Control committee, member of the Governmental Affairs Committee, and member of the Health Policy Committee. He also served as President of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (2001-2002) and has sat on the editorial board of the Journal of the National Medical Association. Steven N. Blair, P.E.D.

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary Steven N. Blair, P.E.D., is President and CEO of The Cooper Institute in Dallas, Texas. His research focuses on associations between lifestyle and health with emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition and chronic disease. Dr. Blair served as the first president of the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity and held the position of Senior Scientific Editor for the Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. Dr. Blair also served as a member of the IOM Committee to Develop Criteria for Evaluating the Outcomes of Approaches to Prevent and Treat Obesity. Robert Brewer, M.D. Dr. Brewer is the Alcohol Team Leader in the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) at CDC. In this position, he provides overall management and direction for the Alcohol Team, and serves as Principal Investigator on an RWJF-funded update of Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) software. Prior to assuming his current position in Atlanta, Dr. Brewer worked as the State Chronic Disease Epidemiologist in Nebraska, on assignment through the NCCDPHP’s Field Epidemiology Program. Prior to this, Dr. Brewer led the CDC’s work on the prevention of alcohol-impaired driving at the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, and served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in North Carolina. Dr. Brewer has authored and co-authored many publications and reports on alcohol use, particularly binge drinking, and alcohol-related health effects. He has also won numerous awards for his work in public health, including two Outstanding Service Medals from the USPHS and the Shepard Science Award, CDC/ATSDR’s preeminent award for scientific excellence, for a study he first-authored on deaths in alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes. Graham Colditz, M.D. Graham Colditz, M.D., is Head of the Chronic Disease Epidemiology Group, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital & Harvard Medical School. He is Epidemiologist and Principal Investigator of the ongoing Nurses’ Health Study located at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. This cohort, founded by Frank Speizer, M.D., follows 121,700 U.S. women with a questionnaire assessment of lifestyle factors and the use of biomarkers to assess risk of chronic diseases. He also serves as Principal Investigator of an ongoing cohort study of 16,000 adolescents relating diet, physical activity, smoking, and weight gain among adolescents. He has a major interest in the etiology and prevention of cancer, working with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to translate research findings from ongoing cohort studies into public health strategies for prevention. He teaches cancer prevention, and a course on implementing prevention. His additional public health practice activities include collaborations through the Women, Infants, and Children program to improve diet assessment and nutrition education in the service delivery setting. Within the Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention, Dr. Colditz serves as the Director and has taken a leadership role in developing the Center’s website, http://www.yourcancerrisk.harvard.edu/, which provides information to the public on the contribution of lifestyle factors to cancer incidence and the potential for preventing cancer. In 2003 Dr. Colditz was the recipient of the American Chemical Society’s Clinical Research

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary Professorship award. He also serves as a Director of the New England division of the American Cancer Society. He is a Fellow of the Australian Faculty of Public Health Medicine, the Royal Australian College of Physicians. Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D. Harvey V. Fineberg, M.D., Ph.D., is President of the Institute of Medicine. He served as Provost of Harvard University from 1997 to 2001, following 13 years as Dean of the Harvard School of Public Health. He has devoted most of his academic career to the fields of health policy and medical decision making. His past research has focused on the process of policy development and implementation, assessment of medical technology, evaluation and use of vaccines, and dissemination of medical innovations. Dr. Fineberg helped found and served as President of the Society for Medical Decision Making and also served as consultant to the World Health Organization. At the Institute of Medicine, he has chaired and served on a number of panels dealing with health policy issues, ranging from AIDS to new medical technology. He also served as a member of the Public Health Council of Massachusetts (1976-1979), Chair of the Health Care Technology Study Section of the National Center for Health Services Research (1982-1985), and President of the Association of Schools of Public Health (1995-1996). Dr. Fineberg is co-author of the books Clinical Decision Analysis, Innovators in Physician Education, and The Epidemic That Never Was, an analysis of the controversial federal immunization program against swine flu in 1976. He has co-edited several books on such diverse topics as AIDS prevention, vaccine safety, and understanding risk in society. He has also authored numerous articles published in professional journals. In 1988, he received the Joseph W. Mountain Prize from the Centers for Disease Control and the Wade Hampton Frost Prize from the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association. Dr. Fineberg earned his bachelor's and doctoral degrees from Harvard University. Eric Finkelstein, Ph.D. Eric Finkelstein, Ph.D., is a Senior Health Economist at RTI International. He is the Associate Director for the RTI-University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion Economics and also teaches an undergraduate health economics course at Duke University. He focuses on the economic causes and consequences of health behaviors, with a primary emphasis on behaviors related to obesity. Dr. Finkelstein has published several peer-reviewed papers in this area. One, “National Medical Expenditures Attributable to Overweight and Obesity,” appeared in Health Affairs and garnered national media attention, including a front-page story in USA Today and coverage in the Economist, Time magazine, and the Washington Post, and was reported by other radio, television, newspaper, and Internet outlets across the country. That paper is now routinely cited as a driving motivation to reduce obesity rates. A follow-on paper, published in Obesity Research, quantifies the costs of obesity at the state level and also received substantial media attention. Dr. Finkelstein leads several projects concerning the causes and consequences of obesity and evaluates several obesity prevention programs for CDC and other public and private

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary sector agencies. He frequently speaks at conferences about the economic impact of obesity and strategies for reducing this burden. Katherine Flegal, Ph.D., M.P.H. Katherine Flegal, Ph.D., M.P.H., is a Senior Research Scientist and Distinguished Consultant at the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in Hyattsville MD. Dr. Flegal works with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) program. She has published widely on the epidemiology of obesity and overweight in the United States. Dr. Flegal's current research projects include new estimates of the prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults and children in the U.S., methodological examination of the issues of estimating deaths attributable to obesity, and the use of self-reported height and weight in epidemiologic studies. She is also a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Weight and Health at the University of California at Berkeley. Mitchell Gail, M.D., Ph.D. Mitchell Gail, M.D., Ph.D., is Chief of the Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics National Cancer Institute. He received an M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1968 and a Ph.D. in statistics from George Washington University in 1977. Dr. Gail is a Fellow and former President of the American Statistical Association, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, an elected member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and an elected member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences. He has received the Spiegelman Gold Medal for Health Statistics, the Snedecor Award for applied statistical research, the Howard Temin Award for AIDS Research, the NIH Director's Award, and the Public Health Service’s Distinguished Service Medal. His research interests include: developing statistical methods for epidemiologic studies, including intervention trials and genetic epidemiologic studies, modeling absolute risk of disease, including breast cancer risk projection, and gastric cancer etiology, including an intervention trial to reduce the prevalence of advanced precancerous gastric lesions in Shandong Province, China. Julie Louise Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H. Julie Louise Gerberding, M.D., M.P.H., is the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). Dr. Gerberding was previously Acting Deputy Director of National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID), where she played a major role in leading CDC’s response to the anthrax bioterrorism events of 2001. She joined CDC in 1998 as Director of the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, NCID, where she developed CDC’s patient safety initiatives and other programs to prevent infections, antimicrobial resistance, and medical errors in healthcare settings. Prior to coming to CDC, Dr. Gerberding was a faculty member at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) and directed the Prevention Epicenter, a multidisciplinary research, training, and clinical service program that focused on preventing infections in patients and their healthcare providers. Dr. Gerberding is an Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine (infectious diseases) at Emory University and an Associate Professor of Medicine (infectious

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary diseases) at UCSF. She earned a B.A. magna cum laude in chemistry and biology and an M.D. at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland. Dr. Gerberding then completed her internship and residency in internal medicine at UCSF, where she also served as Chief Medical Resident before completing her fellowship in clinical pharmacology and infectious diseases at UCSF. She earned an M.P.H. degree. Marthe Gold, M.D., M.P.H. Marthe Gold, M.D., M.P.H., has served as the Arthur C. Logan Professor and Chair of the Department of Community Health and Social Medicine at the City University of New York Medical School since 1997. She has served as a Senior Policy Adviser in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), and on the 1993 Task Force for Health Care Reform, where she worked on benefit design and protections for vulnerable populations. Dr. Gold directed the work of the Panel on Cost Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, a non-federal expert panel whose final report, issued by DHHS in 1996, remains an influential guide to cost-effectiveness methodology for academic and policy uses. She served as co editor of the Institute of Medicine’s 1998 report Summarizing Population Health, and has participated in national and international groups seeking to standardize health status measures. Dr. Gold has published in the areas of socioeconomic predictors of and disparities in health, measurement of health outcomes, and the use of cost-effectiveness analysis in resource allocation. She has served on a number of advisory committees for DHHS agencies, including the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Center for Health Statistics, among other government and privately sponsored advisory groups. A family physician, she trained at and served on the faculty of the Department of Community and Family Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical School. Steve Goodman, M.D., Ph.D. Steve Goodman, M.D., Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Oncology, Pediatrics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. As statistician for the Hopkins Oncology Center, General Clinical Research Center, and Pediatric Clinical Research Unit, he has participated in the design and analysis of a wide range of clinical and epidemiologic studies. He has served as Statistical Editor at the Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987. His research interests include meta-analysis, statistical inference, the ethics of clinical trials, and the use of likelihood and bayesian methodology in clinical research. Dr. Goodman received his M.D. from New York University and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. He has been a member of three IOM committees: the Committee for a Review of Evidence Regarding Link between Exposure to Agent Orange and Diabetes, the Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides: Second Biennial Update, and the Committee on Immunization Safety Review. Barry Graubard, Ph.D. Barry Graubard, Ph.D., is a Senior Investigator, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute (NCI). He began his career as a mathematical statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics in 1977, and held research positions at the Alcohol Drug

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary Abuse and Mental Health Administration and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Graubard joined the NCI in 1990. He received the American Statistical Association and Biometric Society Snedecor Award for Applied Statistical Research in 1990, and is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association. Corinne G. Husten, M.D., M.P.H. Dr. Corinne Husten currently serves as the Acting Director of the Office on Smoking and Health, CDC. In this capacity, she provides leadership and direction on research, policy, communications, and programmatic initiatives to reduce the disease burden from tobacco use. Prior to becoming the Director, Dr. Husten was Chief of the Epidemiology Branch. As Branch Chief, she led surveillance, research, and evaluation activities in the Office. Dr. Husten is a known expert on the science and practice of tobacco control and brings years of management experience, scientific experience, and commitment to tobacco prevention and control. Dr. Husten received her MD degree from the Georgetown University School of Medicine, and her MPH in epidemiology from Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. She is Board Certified in both Family Practice and Preventive Medicine. Dr. Husten has more than 75 scientific publications on a variety of tobacco topics including tobacco use in various populations, second hand smoke, minors’ access, insurance coverage of and treatment of tobacco use, and global tobacco use. Nicole Lurie, M.D., M.S.P.H. Nicole Lurie, M.D., M.S.P.H., is Senior Natural Scientist and the Paul O'Neill Alcoa Professor of Health Policy at RAND. Her work for the Center includes helping define a prioritized research agenda for preparedness and response activities, and outlining approaches to better link the public health and healthcare delivery systems. Before joining RAND, Dr. Lurie was Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Minnesota, and most recently, Medical Advisor to the Commissioner of the Minnesota Department of Health. From 1998-2001, she served as Assistant Secretary of Health in the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). As Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Health at DHHS, Dr. Lurie had line responsibility for the Office of Emergency Preparedness, which included developing emergency response plans at state and local levels, including plans for events involving multiple jurisdictions and an influenza pandemic. She was involved with flu surveillance and response at a time when hospitals in multiple jurisdictions across the country were full, with multiple preparedness and response exercises, and with other efforts to directly link public health and health delivery sectors. Throughout her career, Dr. Lurie’s research has focused on health services, primarily in the areas of access to and quality of care, managed care, mental health, prevention, and health disparities. She is leading a collaborative effort, centered at RAND, to study the impact of changes in the healthcare safety net in the District of Columbia, and to develop a collaborative, public-private health data infrastructure for the District and the region. J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P. J. Michael McGinnis, M.D., M.P.P., is Counselor to the President at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He holds degrees in political science, medicine, and public policy from the

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary University of California at Berkeley, UCLA, and Harvard University. For nearly three decades he has been a participant in national prevention policy, including a continuous appointment—as Assistant Surgeon General and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health—throughout the Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton Administrations, from 1977-1995, with responsibility for coordinating health promotion and disease prevention activities. Internationally, Dr. McGinnis has held leadership positions in 1974-75 to eradicate smallpox in India, and in 1995-96 for the postwar reconstruction of the health sector in Bosnia. His academic work has included appointments as Scholar-in-Residence at the National Academy of Sciences, and to the faculties of George Washington, Princeton, and Duke Universities. He has published numerous papers on health policy, public health, preventive medicine, nutrition, and tobacco, and served on various journal, scientific, and community boards. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), a Fellow in the American College of Epidemiology and the American College of Preventive Medicine, and has received various public service awards. He is currently a member of the IOM Committee on Establishing a National Cord Blood Stem Cell Bank Program and the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. His previous service for the National Academy of Science includes the Food and Nutrition Board and the Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, Health, and the Environment. George A. Mensah, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.C.C. George A. Mensah, M.D. currently serves as the Acting Director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion within CDC’s Coordinating Center for Health Promotion. He was previously the chief of the Cardiovascular Health Branch in the Division of Adult and Community Health at CDC. He is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia. Prior to joining the CDC, he was professor with tenure at the Medical College of Georgia and Chief of Cardiology at the VA Medical Center in Augusta, Georgia. Dr. Mensah graduated with honors in Biology from Harvard College and has a doctorate in medicine from Washington University. His postgraduate training in internal medicine and cardiology was at the Cornell Medical Center in New York. He has served on the cardiology faculties at Vanderbilt University and the Medical College of Georgia. He holds fellowships in the American College of Physicians, American College of Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology and the Council of Clinical Cardiology of the American Heart Association. Christopher Murray, M.D., Ph.D. Christopher Murray, M.D., Ph.D., is the Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Policy, Director of the Harvard University Global Health Initiative, and the former Executive Director of the Evidence and Information for Policy Cluster at the World Health Organization. He is a physician and health economist. His early work focused on tuberculosis control and development of the pioneering Global Burden of Disease project at Harvard University. Recently he has initiated major new approaches to the measurement of population health, cost-effectiveness analysis, and the conceptualization, measurement, and national application of health systems performance assessment. He has authored or edited seven books, many book chapters, and more than 90 journal articles in internationally peer-reviewed publications. James Robins, Ph.D.

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary James Robins, Ph.D., is the Mitchell L. and Robin LaFoley Dong Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health. The principal focus of Dr. Robins’s research has been the development of analytic methods appropriate for drawing causal inferences from complex observational and randomized studies with time-varying exposures or treatments. Dr. Robins has applied his methods to analyze the effect of a non-randomized treatment aerosolized pentamidine on the survival of AIDS patients in ACTG Trial 002; the effect of arsenic exposure on the mortality experience of a cohort of Montana copper smelter workers; the effect of formaldehyde on the respiratory disease mortality of a cohort of U.S. chemical workers; and the effect of smoking cessation on subsequent myocardial infarction and death within the MRFIT randomized trial. Beverly Rockhill, Ph.D. Beverly Rockhill, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the University Of North Carolina, School of Public Health. Her recent research has focused on evaluating the goodness of fit and discriminatory accuracy of breast cancer risk prediction models. She is currently extending this quantitative research into the area of breast cancer risk communication; specifically, into how to convey epidemiologic findings on risk and risk factors to individuals and policymakers. Her future research plans include examination of public attitudes toward, and understanding of, health risk messages, including information on the benefits and risks of disease screening, and examination of the positive and negative social consequences of a focus on individual risk and individual susceptibility for primary prevention strategies directed against common cancers. Allison B. Rosen, M.D., Sc.D. Allison B. Rosen, M.D., Sc.D., is an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and an Assistant Professor of Health Management and Policy at the University of Michigan. She also serves as an Attending Physician at the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Rosen is a general internist and her research focuses on the impact of benefit structure and design on quality and value of healthcare for chronic diseases. Dr. Rosen received her undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania and medical training at Duke University. After completing her residency in internal medicine at the University of California San Francisco, she was an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Health Services Research Fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health, where she completed her doctoral work in health policy and management Katherine Rowan, Ph.D. Katherine Rowan, Ph.D., is Professor of Communication at George Mason University, Fairfax, VA. Her research concerns the public relations challenges of earning trust and explaining complexities in risk and crisis communication contexts. Professor Rowan became interested in risk communication through studies of science communication in the mass media. She has authored or edited over 40 scholarly and governmental publications concerning effective methods for earning trust and explaining complex science. During the last 15 years she has given presentations on risk and science communication for organizations such as the National Library

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary of Medicine, Agricultural Communicators in Education, the Indiana Arborists, the Garden Writers of America, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, the National Academy of Science, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Louise Russell, Ph.D. Louise Russell, Ph.D., is Research Professor of Health Economics at Rutgers University. She is the author of seven influential books and monographs, including Technology in Hospitals (1979); Is Prevention better than Cure? (1986); Medicare’s New Hospital Payment System: Is It Working? (1989); and Educated Guesses: Making Policy About Medical Screening Tests (1994). She has made outstanding contributions to health policy studies, particularly in the areas of technical diffusion, prevention, and cost-effectiveness analysis. She has served on major national advisory groups, including the first U.S. Preventive Services Task Force sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services (1984-1988), and was Co-Chair of the U.S. Public Health Service’s Panel on Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine (1993-1996). The recommendations of the panel, which have been influential in changing the way cost-effectiveness studies are done in health, were published as a book by Oxford University Press, Cost-Effectiveness in Health and Medicine, 1996), and in a series of three articles published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in October 1996. She is currently continuing her work on cost-effectiveness analysis and on developing and applying a computerized simulation model that projects mortality and hospital admissions, nursing home admissions, and mortality for a representative sample of U.S. adults. The model has been described in the American Journal of Public Health, “Modeling All-Cause Mortality: Projections of the Impact of Smoking Cessation Based on the NHEFS,” April 1998, and the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, “Preventable Smoking and Exercise-Related Hospital Admissions,” January 2001. Richard Scheines, Ph.D. Richard Scheines, Ph.D., is Professor of Philosophy at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, with dual appointments at the Center for Automated Learning and Discovery and the Human-Computer Interaction Institute. He received his B.A. in history from Hobart College and joined the Carnegie Mellon faculty after receiving his Ph.D. in history and philosophy of science from the University of Pittsburgh in 1987. Dr. Scheines’ research focuses on the connections between causal structure and data, especially social science and behavioral science data. He has collaborated for more than two decades with statisticians and computer scientists on a project to axiomatize the relationship between causal models and statistical independence to characterize what can and cannot be learned about causal claims from statistical data in a variety of empirical settings, and to develop and implement algorithms for causal discovery. His research interests emphasize the problem of inferring causal relations among latent variables, such as intelligence, that cannot be measured directly. He has applied this work to several policy areas, including estimating the effects of low-level exposure to lead on the cognitive capacities of children, and determining the effects of welfare reform on single mothers and their ability to effectively parent. Dr. Scheines currently receives support from the McDonnell Foundation for developing online courseware in causal and statistical reasoning. He has co-authored dozens of articles and three books on causal inference and causal discovery, and designed an online course in causal and statistical reasoning.

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary Donna F. Stroup, Ph.D., M.Sc. Donna F. Stroup, Ph.D., M.Sc. is Director of the Coordinating Center Health Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). As the first director of the Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, established as part of CDC 2004 Futures Initiative, Dr. Stroup shares the full responsibility for shaping the policies, plans, and strategies of CDC’s New Center for Health Promotion, comprised of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), The National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, and the Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention. This major operating unit of CDC plans, directs, and coordinates national and international programs addressing chronic diseases, disabilities, and birth defects, which account for more than 70% of all deaths and for more than 75% of the nation’s $1.4 trillion medical care costs. Her current position makes her the highest ranking statistician at CDC. Previously, Dr. Stroup served as Associate Director for Science for NCCDPHP and for the Epidemiology Program Office (EPO). Before that, she was on the statistics faculty of three universities. An internally recognized expert in public health epidemiology and surveillance, Dr. Stroup has been appointed to academic and government positions in France, Trinidad, China, and England. She has received awards from, and has helped direct, numerous organizations dealing with epidemiology and statistics, and she is widely published in the areas of research synthesis, methods for detection of aberration in public health data, risk communication, and assessment of research impact. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a Fellow of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the American Epidemiologic Society, and an Honorary Member of the Epidemic Intelligence Service, the first woman ever accorded this honor. Dr. Stroup continues to advise the CDC team that in 1998 won the government-wide Group Award for Outstanding Service to the Public for developing a curriculum to improve students’ scientific and quantitative literacy by teaching epidemiology from kindergarten through high schools. Michael A. Stoto, Ph.D. Michael A. Stoto, Ph.D., is a Biostatistician and Epidemiologist with research interests in a variety of topics related to the use of statistical data and quantitative analysis in public health policy. His research interests include methodological topics in epidemiology, biostatistics, and demography, community health assessment, risk analysis and management, and the evaluation of public health interventions as well as substantive issues in public health policy and practice. As Associate Director of the RAND Center for Domestic and International Health Security, Dr. Stoto has helped develop RAND’s efforts in bioterrorism, focusing on surveillance and other public health issues. He is an Adjunct Professor of Biostatistics at the Harvard School of Public Health and a Professor of Policy Analysis at RAND Graduate School. He has served on the faculty of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government, and on the professional staff of the Institute of Medicine. He holds a Ph.D. in statistics from Harvard University. Michael Thun, M.D. Michael Thun, M.D., is Vice President for Epidemiology & Surveillance Research at the American Cancer Society. He has served in that position since 1998, overseeing both cancer surveillance and analyses of large cohort studies on the causes and prevention of cancer. He is

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Estimating the Contributions of Lifestyle-Related Factors to Preventable Death: A Workshop Summary the author of nearly 200 publications, book chapters, books, and published proceedings. His research covers a wide range of issues within cancer epidemiology, with particular emphasis on the epidemiology of tobacco-attributable diseases and the potential of NSAIDs as anti-cancer agents. Daniel Wikler, Ph.D. Daniel Wikler, Ph.D., is Professor of Ethics and Population Health Department of Population and International Health’s at Harvard School f Public Health. Dr. Wikler’s current research interests are ethical issues in population and international health, including the allocation of health resources, health research involving human subjects, and ethical dilemmas arising in public health practice. He served as the first Staff Ethicist for the World Health Organization, and remains a consultant to several WHO programs. Prof. Wikler was co-founder and second president of the International Association of Bioethics and has served on the advisory boards of the Asian Bioethics Association and the Pan American Health Organization Regional Program in Bioethics. Professor Wikler is presently co-director of the Program on Ethical Issues in International Health Research at the School of Public Health. Professor Wikler’s published work addresses many issues in bioethics, including issues in reproduction, transplantation, and end-of-life decision-making in addition to population and international health.. His book series, Studies in Philosophy and Health Policy, was published by Cambridge University Press, as was From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice, co-authored by Prof. Wikler and three other philosophers. While at the World Health Organization, he instituted an international collaboration among philosophers and economists on ethical, methodological, and philosophical issues raised by WHO’s work in measurement of the global burden of disease and in developing methods for improving health resource allocation. He will be a core faculty member in the new Harvard Program in Ethics and Health and participates in faculty research and curriculum development groups on such issues as disparities in health status and the impact of corruption and fraud on public health.