Appendix A
Committee Biographical Sketches

John Christian Bailar III, Committee Co-chair, is Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago. Over the course of his career, he has held positions at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; McGill University; Harvard University; and the University of Chicago. Dr. Bailar is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine and has served on numerous National Academies committees, including the National Cancer Policy Board, the Commission on Life Sciences, and the Report Review Committee. His research interests have included the causes and prevention of cancer, the health effects of air pollution, and the general methods of research study in epidemiology. Dr. Bailar earned his B.A. in chemistry from the University of Colorado, his M.D. from Yale University, and his Ph.D. in statistics from American University. He brings to this project his general understanding of medical research and the statistical expertise needed to analyze large and complex data sets.


Willie Pearson, Jr., Committee Co-chair, is Professor and Chair of the School of History, Technology, and Society at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Previously, he was professor of sociology at Wake Forest. Most of Dr. Pearson's research has centered on the career patterns of Ph.D. scientists (especially minority scientists) and human resource issues in science and engineering. He is author and co-author of six books and monographs, including Black Scientists, White Society and Colorless Science: A Study of Universalism in American Science (Associated Faculty Press, 1985), Blacks, Education and American Science (Rutgers University Press, 1989), Who Will Do Science?: Educating the Next Generation (John Hopkins University Press, 1994), and Diversity in Science and Technology Centers (Association of Science-Technology Centers, Inc., 1996). He earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1981. Dr. Pearson brings to this committee his expertise in program evaluation and qualitative research.


David Gordon is Associate Dean for Diversity and Career Development, Professor of Pathology, and general cardiovascular pathology consultant with the Pathology Department at the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Previously, he was an associate professor at the University of Washington-Seattle, a research fellow at Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Company (later Pfizer), a professor of pathology and Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs at the University of Michigan, and preclinical researcher on gene therapy and therapeutic angiogenesis at Pfizer, before returning to the University of Michigan. He earned his B.A. in chemistry from Amherst College and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Gordon brings to this committee a first-person perspective on minority clinical research training and extensive experience in mentoring minority research scholars from high school through the faculty levels.



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Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3 Appendix A Committee Biographical Sketches John Christian Bailar III, Committee Co-chair, is Professor Emeritus at the University of Chicago. Over the course of his career, he has held positions at the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; McGill University; Harvard University; and the University of Chicago. Dr. Bailar is a member of the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine and has served on numerous National Academies committees, including the National Cancer Policy Board, the Commission on Life Sciences, and the Report Review Committee. His research interests have included the causes and prevention of cancer, the health effects of air pollution, and the general methods of research study in epidemiology. Dr. Bailar earned his B.A. in chemistry from the University of Colorado, his M.D. from Yale University, and his Ph.D. in statistics from American University. He brings to this project his general understanding of medical research and the statistical expertise needed to analyze large and complex data sets. Willie Pearson, Jr., Committee Co-chair, is Professor and Chair of the School of History, Technology, and Society at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Previously, he was professor of sociology at Wake Forest. Most of Dr. Pearson's research has centered on the career patterns of Ph.D. scientists (especially minority scientists) and human resource issues in science and engineering. He is author and co-author of six books and monographs, including Black Scientists, White Society and Colorless Science: A Study of Universalism in American Science (Associated Faculty Press, 1985), Blacks, Education and American Science (Rutgers University Press, 1989), Who Will Do Science?: Educating the Next Generation (John Hopkins University Press, 1994), and Diversity in Science and Technology Centers (Association of Science-Technology Centers, Inc., 1996). He earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale in 1981. Dr. Pearson brings to this committee his expertise in program evaluation and qualitative research. David Gordon is Associate Dean for Diversity and Career Development, Professor of Pathology, and general cardiovascular pathology consultant with the Pathology Department at the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Previously, he was an associate professor at the University of Washington-Seattle, a research fellow at Parke-Davis Pharmaceutical Company (later Pfizer), a professor of pathology and Assistant Dean for Faculty Affairs at the University of Michigan, and preclinical researcher on gene therapy and therapeutic angiogenesis at Pfizer, before returning to the University of Michigan. He earned his B.A. in chemistry from Amherst College and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Gordon brings to this committee a first-person perspective on minority clinical research training and extensive experience in mentoring minority research scholars from high school through the faculty levels.

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Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3 Marigold Linton divides her time between the roles of Director of Math and Science Initiatives for the University of Texas System and Director of American Indian Outreach at the University of Kansas. In the latter role, she works closely with Haskell Indian Nations University and has developed programs to facilitate the pursuit of research careers by Native American college students. Dr. Linton worked closely with Arizona Tribes on educational and evaluation issues during her tenure at Arizona State University. Previously, she was a professor of psychology at University of Utah and, prior to that, she was a professor of psychology at San Diego State University. Dr. Linton currently serves on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS). She previously served as a member of the NRC Committee on Education and Employment of Minority Group Members in Science. She has served on the Board of Directors for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the National Advisory Resources Council of the National Institutes of General Medical Science at the National Institutes of Health. She earned her B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Riverside, and her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Linton brings to this committee her extensive experience in program evaluation. Craig Love is a Senior Project Leader at Westat, Inc., in Rockville, MD. He oversees a $10-million portfolio of health intervention and program evaluation projects. Previously, he was a research associate at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University, where he conducted research on substance abuse treatment and prevention for criminal justice and Native American populations, and developed a Native American studies program. Dr. Love was also a lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard University. He was President of Clove, Inc., a program planning and evaluation business, specializing in substance abuse and mental health treatment and prevention. Earlier in his career, he was also Director of Evaluation and Research at Spectrum Addiction Services, Inc., where he specialized in program evaluation. Dr. Love earned his B.S. and M.S. in psychology from the University of Kentucky and his Ph.D. in educational psychology from Temple University. He brings to this committee his extensive experience in program evaluation, measurement, diversity in education, statistical analyses, and qualitative research methodologies, including interviewing minority subjects. Barbara Lovitts is a senior program officer in the Center for the Advancement of Scholarship on Engineering Education at the National Academy of Engineering. Previously, she was a senior research analyst at the American Institutes for Research, investigating national and international education policy issues; Deputy Project Director for the National Science Foundation's Evaluation of the Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education program; a program officer in the Education Directorate at the National Science Foundation; and a program associate in the Education Directorate at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is a member of the American Sociological Association. She earned a B.A. in behavioral sciences from the University of Chicago, an M.S. in experimental psychology from the University of Wisconsin, and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Maryland. She is the author of Leaving the Ivory Tower: The Causes and Consequence of Departure from Doctoral Study and a forthcoming book, Making the Implicit Explicit: Creating Performance Expectations and Assessing the Outcomes of Doctoral Education. Dr. Lovitts brings to this committee his expertise in graduate education and qualitative research methodologies, including survey research and program evaluation.

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Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3 Catherine Miller is a senior associate at Hampshire Research Institute in Hamden, Connecticut, where she serves as chief data and policy analyst, and senior programmer on North American, U.S. federal, and state toxics release data and information systems. Previously Dr. Miller was a research associate at INFORM (New York City), working on hazardous/toxic waste issues; a senior associate with Meta Systems Inc. (Cambridge, MA), working on U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (E.P.A.) projects; a consultant with the Rockefeller Brothers Fund (New York City) and with the U.S.E.P.A. (Washington, D.C.); a teaching assistant at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; an intern with the Congressional Budget Office (Washington, D.C.); a program and operations research analyst with the U.S.E.P.A.; and a senior technical aide with Bell Telephone Laboratories (Murray Hill, NJ). She earned her B.A. in mathematics from Smith College in 1968; her M.S. in applied mathematics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1971; and her M.P.P. and Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government in 1977 and 1980, respectively. Dr. Miller brought to the committee her expertise in public policy but health reasons forced her to withdraw from the committee in September 2002. Javier Rojo is Professor of Statistics at Rice University. Previously, he was Professor of Mathematics at the University of Texas, El Paso. His statistical expertise includes point estimation, tail orderings of probability distributions, nonparametrics and survival analysis under order constraints, including censored data. Dr. Rojo was the Program Director for Probability and Statistics at the National Science Foundation and is an elected Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, the American Statistical Association, and the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Dr. Rojo is committed to the education of minority scientists; he has trained and mentored over 50 minority undergraduates, graduates, and junior faculty. He earned his B.S. in mathematics is from University of Texas, El Paso; his M.S. in statistics from Stanford University; and his Ph.D. in statistics from University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Rojo brings to this committee his statistical expertise needed to carry out the analysis portion of the study. Terrence R. Russell is Executive Director at the Association for Institutional Research, an international association devoted to management research, policy analysis, and planning in higher education. He teaches a graduate seminar on institutional research, program assessment, and policy research at Florida State University. Dr. Russell has held research and management positions at the Office of Professional Services at the American Chemical Society, addressing the ethical, professional and career concerns of chemists and other scientists and engineers. He earned his B.A. in psychology, M.S. in community organizing/evaluation research, and Ph.D. in the sociology of science/social theory from Southern Illinois University. Dr. Russell brings to this committee his critical expertise in program evaluation.

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Assessment of NIH Minority Research and Training Programs: Phase 3 Charles E. Vela is President and Chief Scientist of Expertech Solutions, where he leads the R&D program and advises the IRS in the planning, acquisition, and deployment of large-scale and strategic information technology. Previously, he was a Senior Science Advisor for the Illinois Institute of Technology Research Institute; Lead Engineer at the MITRE Corporation; Executive Director of the Center for the Advancement of Hispanics in Science and Engineering (CAHSEE); an assistant study director of a project on the utilization of technologies in mapping the brain at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences; and professor and research fellow in electrical engineering at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Dr. Vela holds advanced degrees in electrical engineering and operations research from the California State University and the National Autonomous University of Mexico, respectively. He brings to this committee his expertise in tracking-system development.