Appendix B
BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON WORKSHOP ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AND SPEAKERS

Workshop Organizing Committee Members

Linda E. Greer (Chair) is senior scientist for the Natural Resources Defense Council and director of its Public Health Program. She received a PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Maryland. Dr. Greer’s primary focus is on toxic-chemical pollution policy issues and risk assessment. She has served on numerous National Research Council committees including the Committee on Industrial Competitiveness and Environmental Protection, the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, and the Committee on Hazardous Wastes in Highway Rights-of-Way. Dr. Greer now serves on the National Research Council Board on Life Sciences.


James S. Bus (Vice Chair) is director of external technology at Dow Chemical Company. He received his PhD in pharmacology from Michigan State University in 1975. His research interests include the mechanism of superoxide radical-mediated paraquat toxicity; the relationship between benzene metabolism and toxicity; metabolic pathways as defense mechanisms in toxicant exposure; and mode-of-action considerations in the use of transgenic animals for mutagenicity and carcinogenic-



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Toxicogenomic Technologies and Risk Assessment of Environmental Carcinogens: A Workshop Summary Appendix B BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION ON WORKSHOP ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AND SPEAKERS Workshop Organizing Committee Members Linda E. Greer (Chair) is senior scientist for the Natural Resources Defense Council and director of its Public Health Program. She received a PhD in environmental toxicology from the University of Maryland. Dr. Greer’s primary focus is on toxic-chemical pollution policy issues and risk assessment. She has served on numerous National Research Council committees including the Committee on Industrial Competitiveness and Environmental Protection, the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives, and the Committee on Hazardous Wastes in Highway Rights-of-Way. Dr. Greer now serves on the National Research Council Board on Life Sciences. James S. Bus (Vice Chair) is director of external technology at Dow Chemical Company. He received his PhD in pharmacology from Michigan State University in 1975. His research interests include the mechanism of superoxide radical-mediated paraquat toxicity; the relationship between benzene metabolism and toxicity; metabolic pathways as defense mechanisms in toxicant exposure; and mode-of-action considerations in the use of transgenic animals for mutagenicity and carcinogenic-

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Toxicogenomic Technologies and Risk Assessment of Environmental Carcinogens: A Workshop Summary ity evaluations. He is a member of several professional societies, including the Society of Toxicology (serving as president in 1996-1997), the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists, and the Teratology Society, and he is a diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology. John D. Groopman is the Anna M. Baetjer Professor of Environmental Health and chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He received a PhD in toxicology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Groopman’s research interests include molecular biomarkers of environmental carcinogens, molecular epidemiology, monitoring human exposure to and mechanisms of action of aflatoxins, dosimetry of foodborne carcinogens and mutagens, and human placental carcinogen metabolism and DNA-adduct formation. He has written on risk assessment for environmental justice and prevention of work-related diseases. Dr. Groopman has also served on the National Research Council Panel on Life Sciences. John A. Moore received his DVM from Michigan State University, is a board-certified toxicologist, and has primary interests in risk assessment and developmental and reproductive toxicology. Dr. Moore has held a number of senior positions in the US government, including assistant administrator for pesticides and toxic substances and acting deputy administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, deputy director of the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and director of toxicology research and testing at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. He served for 10 years as head of the not-for-profit Institute for Evaluating Health Risks and recently completed a 5-year term as principal scientist at the NTP Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction. Dr. Moore has served on several National Research Council committees, including being chair of the Subcommittee on the Toxicity of Diisopropyl Methylphosphonate and a member of the Subcommittee on Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology. Kenneth S. Ramos is professor and chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Louisville Health Sciences Center. He received a PhD in biochemical pharmacology and toxicology from the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests

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Toxicogenomic Technologies and Risk Assessment of Environmental Carcinogens: A Workshop Summary include gene-environment interactions in human health (chemical atherogenesis, glomerulonephropathies, and nephrogenesis) and redox-regulated transcriptional control. Dr. Ramos has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Committee for a Review of Evidence Regarding the Link Between Exposure to Agent Orange and Diabetes, the HHMI Predoctoral Fellowships Panel on Neurosciences and Physiology, and the Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides: First and Second Biennial Updates. Cheryl Lyn Walker is the Ruth and Walter Sterling Professor of Carcinogenesis at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. She earned a PhD in cell biology from Southwestern Medical School. Dr. Walker’s research interests include the genetic basis of susceptibility to cancer, specifically the interaction of carcinogens with genes during tumor development; the effects of endocrine disruptors on human health; and animal models for human disease. She also studies the molecular mechanisms of kidney, breast, and uterine cancers and the effect of hormones of gene expression. She has served on the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences National Toxicology Program and on the Board of Directors of the Society of Toxicology. Timothy R. Zacharewski is an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Michigan State University. He earned a PhD in toxicology from Texas A&M University. Dr. Zacharewski’s research interests include toxicogenomics and endocrine disruptors. His current research regarding toxicogenomics includes using gene-expression array technology to investigate the effects of gestational and lactational exposure to estrogenic substances on male reproductive development and fertility in mice, to examine the effects of estrogenic chemicals on in vitro human neuronal stem-cell differentiation and cell-cell communication, and to establish signature gene-expression profiles for various classes of chemicals and complex mixtures with in vitro and in vivo models. Dr. Zacharewski serves on the National Research Council Subcommittee on Process to Identify Hazards and Assess the Unintended Effects of Genetically Engineered Foods on Human Health.

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Toxicogenomic Technologies and Risk Assessment of Environmental Carcinogens: A Workshop Summary Additional Workshop Speaker David L. Eaton is professor of environmental health and associate dean of research at the School of Public Health and Community Medicine and director of the Center for Ecogenetics and Environmental Health at the University of Washington. He received a PhD in pharmacology from the University of Kansas Medical Center. Dr. Eaton’s research interests include the molecular basis of environmental causes of cancer and how human genetic differences in biotransformation enzymes may increase or decrease individual susceptibility to chemicals found in the environment. He has served on numerous boards and committees; he was on the Board of Directors and was treasurer of the American Board of Toxicology (1990-1994) and was recently the president of the Society of Toxicology. He is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Eaton has also served on the National Research Council Board of Environmental Studies and Toxicology and the Subcommittee to Update the 1999 Arsenic Report.