Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

MARK W. LIPSEY (Chair) is the director of the Center for Evaluation Research and Methodology and a senior research associate at the Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy Studies. His professional interests are in the areas of public policy, program evaluation research, social intervention, field research methodology, and research synthesis (meta-analysis). The foci of his recent research have been risk and intervention for juvenile delinquency and issues of methodological quality in program evaluation research. Professor Lipsey serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Psychological Bulletin, Evaluation and Program Planning, and the American Journal of Community Psychology, and on boards or committees of the National Research Council, National Institutes of Health, Institute of Education Sciences, Campbell Collaboration, and Blueprints for Violence Prevention. He has received awards for his work from the Society for Prevention Research, American Evaluation Association, Center for Child Welfare Policy, and the American Parole and Probation Association Society and is coauthor of textbooks on program evaluation (Evaluation: A Systematic Approach) and meta-analysis (Practical Meta-Analysis). He received a Ph.D. in psychology from the Johns Hopkins University in 1972 following a B.S. in applied psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1968.


JOHN L. ADAMS is a senior statistician in the Statistics Group at the RAND Corporation. His research interests include health care, especially quality measurement systems using both process and outcomes; profiling of health plans, provider groups, and physicians; assessing the quality of



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Improving Evaluation of Anticrime Programs Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff MARK W. LIPSEY (Chair) is the director of the Center for Evaluation Research and Methodology and a senior research associate at the Vanderbilt Institute for Public Policy Studies. His professional interests are in the areas of public policy, program evaluation research, social intervention, field research methodology, and research synthesis (meta-analysis). The foci of his recent research have been risk and intervention for juvenile delinquency and issues of methodological quality in program evaluation research. Professor Lipsey serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Psychological Bulletin, Evaluation and Program Planning, and the American Journal of Community Psychology, and on boards or committees of the National Research Council, National Institutes of Health, Institute of Education Sciences, Campbell Collaboration, and Blueprints for Violence Prevention. He has received awards for his work from the Society for Prevention Research, American Evaluation Association, Center for Child Welfare Policy, and the American Parole and Probation Association Society and is coauthor of textbooks on program evaluation (Evaluation: A Systematic Approach) and meta-analysis (Practical Meta-Analysis). He received a Ph.D. in psychology from the Johns Hopkins University in 1972 following a B.S. in applied psychology from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1968. JOHN L. ADAMS is a senior statistician in the Statistics Group at the RAND Corporation. His research interests include health care, especially quality measurement systems using both process and outcomes; profiling of health plans, provider groups, and physicians; assessing the quality of

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Improving Evaluation of Anticrime Programs care; and the construction and evaluation of simulation models with a special focus on characterization and quantification of sources of uncertainty. He is the author of numerous articles on these topics and, with others, of the book Public Policy and Statistics: Case Studies from RAND. For the National Academies Committee on National Statistics, he has served as a committee member for the Panel Study of Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs and the Panel to Review Research and Development Statistics at the National Science Foundation. DENISE C. GOTTFREDSON is a professor at the University of Maryland Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology. Gottfredson’s research interests include delinquency and delinquency prevention, and particularly the effects of school environments on youth behavior. Much of Gottfredson’s career has been devoted to developing effective collaborations between researchers and practitioners. She directs a project that provides research expertise to the Maryland Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention in its efforts to promote effective prevention practices in Maryland. She has recently completed randomized experiments to test the effectiveness of the Baltimore City Drug Treatment Court and the Strengthening Families Program in Washington DC. She is currently directing a randomized trial of the effects of after school programs on the development of problem behavior. She received a Ph.D. in Social Relations from the Johns Hopkins University, where she specialized in Sociology of Education. JOHN V. PEPPER is associate professor of economics at the University of Virginia. His current work reflects his wide range of interests in social program evaluation, applied econometrics, and public economics. His current work examines such subjects as disability status, teenage childbearing, welfare system rules, and drugs and crime. He is an author of numerous published papers, conference presentations and edited books including several National Research Council reports—Measurement Problems in Criminal Justice Research (2003, with Carol Petrie), Informing America’s Policy on Illegal Drugs: What We Don’t Know Keeps Hurting Us (2001, with Charles Manski and Carol Petrie), Assessment of Two Cost-Effectiveness Studies on Cocaine Control Policy (1999, with Charles Manski and Yonette Thomas), and Firearms and Violence: A Critical Review (2005, with Charles Wellford and Carol Petrie). Professor Pepper received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. DAVID WEISBURD is the Walter E. Mayer Professor of Law and Criminal Justice at Hebrew University Law School in Jerusalem and professor

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Improving Evaluation of Anticrime Programs of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is also a senior fellow at the Police Foundation and chair of its Research Advisory Committee. He has also served as research associate at Yale Law School, senior research associate at the Vera Institute of Justice, associate professor at the School of Criminal Justice at Rutgers University, and director of the Center for Crime Prevention Studies. Professor Weisburd is a fellow of the American Society of Criminology and the Academy of Experimental Criminology. He has served as a principal investigator for a number of federally supported research studies and as a scientific and statistical advisor to local, national, and international organizations. He is author or editor of 11 books and more than 60 scientific articles covering a broad array of topics in crime and justice, including many that deal with methodological or statistical applications in criminal justice research. Professor Weisburd is the founding editor of the Journal of Experimental Criminology and coeditor of the Israel Law Review. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University. CAROL V. PETRIE (Project Director) is the staff director of the Committee on Law and Justice at the National Research Council, a position she has held since 1997. Prior to that, she was the director of planning and management at the National Institute of Justice, responsible for policy development and administration. In 1994, she served as the acting director of the National Institute of Justice during the transition between the Bush and Clinton administrations. Throughout a 30-year career, she has worked in the area of criminal justice research, statistics, and public policy, serving as a project officer and in administration at the National Institute of Justice and at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. She has conducted research on violence and managed numerous research projects on the development of criminal behavior, policy on illegal drugs, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, transnational crime, and improving the operations of the criminal justice system. She has a B.S. in education from Kent State University.