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Appendix Letter of Inquiry

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NA1lONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL COMMISSION ON BEHAVIORAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCES AND EDUCATION 2101 Con'6tubon Avenue \ - shington. D. C. 2~18 Gnome ON RESEARCH ~ MA EM^ncs. ICE. AND TECHNOLOGY EDuc~noN Dear April 10, 1985 I a. seeking your help in a study being undertaken by the National Research Council at the behest of the National Science Foundation Foundation has asked our Committee on Research in Mathematics, Science, and Technolgoy Education (list of members enclosed) to develop strategies for fostering lnterdi~ciolinarY research in education. The question is simple: How can outstanding thematiclane9 scientists from the natural, behavioral and social sciences' and educatlona1 researchers and practitioners be attracted to work collaboratively and productively on problems of mathematics and science education? It seems to us that the history of the 1960s ought to be an integral part of the renewed efforts of the 1980s to improve mathematics and science education in the schools. Your experience as one of the leaders of curriculum reform is an invaluable resource as the country attempts once more to improve the teaching and learning of mathematics and science. We are asking you and about a dozen others to provide some reflections on the projects with which you were involved, especially regarding the processes for doing collaborative work: o What Motivated outstanding scholar. to work on the 1960s curriculum projects? What incentives were provided? What disincentives were there? I the climate different now? If so, what incentives are needed now? O How was participation in a curriculum project viewed by the participant's institution, peers, professional community? }low did this differ depending on one' ~ discipline and type of institution (research unlversiq, college, school)? To what extent, if at all, have these attitudes changed? O How much collaborative work .. with other scientific disciplines, with educational researchers, with teachers and educators -. was involved in the projects with which you are familiar? How much was perceived as necessary? Whae is your view on the need today for such collaborative research? (202) 334~3290 ' TO N tinsel Ite#arch Council ~ the priRa~l op~tirt c' - ret of the NeNonal Arede.Ry of SarRc" and alar Nsho~cl Army - y of E~'ierr" to trod t - #rRfR#ret ered of/err oqlarei~Hon' 7S

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76 April 10, 1985 Page 2 0 What wore factors __ i o Id ~ 9 9 helped or hladered participants from different ur~iversity departments,, from precollege institueiorm9 from a variety of assoclations9 from the private sector in working together effeeti~ly? Ue appreciae. that you are probably very buy and have titele tin to respond in details However, we are not asklug for a paper but only that you Jot down in a page or two your refiectlons on these issu.e ant ocher related ones that con to Bind. A stamped, addressed return envelope is enclosed for your con~renience. If you prefer, respond over she telephone; Senta Raider`, our study directors would be happy to hear from you or answer aver questions you might have. Her telephone m~cr is (202) 334~3290. In advanco~, thank you very Arch for your cooperation and asaist~ee. Cordially, Ja_e Go March ChaiNn

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77 Request for Responses* Dr. Jerome S. Bn~nor George Herbert Mead University Professor Hew School for Social Research Dr. Robert B. Davis Curriculum Laboratory University of Illinois/Urbana DrO Andrew M. Gleason Professor of Mathematics Harvard University Dr. David Hawkins Distinguished Professor Emeritus University of Colorado Dr. Gerald Holton Mallinckrod~c Professor of Physics, and Professor of History of Science Harvard University Dr. Arthur H. LiveDore Consultant Bethesda, Maryland formerly, Director of Education Research, African Association for the Advancement of Science) Dr. William V. Mayer President Emeritus Biological Science Curriculum Study Company * Affiliation as of April 1985 Dr. John Mayor Assistant Provost for Research University of Maryland Dr. John Ao Moore Chairperson, Education Committee Society for the Study of Evolution University of California, Riverside Dr. Philip Morrison Professor of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dr. George CO Pimentel Chairman, Department of Chemis try Unl~rersity of California, Berkeley Or. Henry 0. Pollak Assistant Vice President Bell Communications Research, Inc. Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg Unlvereley Professor of Chemistry University of Calfiornia DrO John Go Trmcal Distinguished Teaching Profesor State University of New York at Stony Brook DrO Jerrold R. Zacharias Education Development Center, Inc. Newton, Hassachw etts

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