Committee Biographies

Richard R. Monson, M.D., Sc.D. (chair), is associate dean for professional education and professor of epidemiology at the Harvard University School of Public Health. He earned an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an Sc.D. in epidemiology and biostatistics from the Harvard School of Public Health. He was a Fulbright scholar. His research interests in epidemiology include evaluation of the risks of exposure to radiation, health effects of exposure to machining fluids, and potential health effects of environmental exposure to chemicals. From 1992 through 2004, he was principal investigator of a Superfund program project award from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Dr. Monson has served on numerous national and international advisory groups, including two committees of the National Research Council (NRC), and on several public and private advisory committees that addressed issues concerning exposure to radiation and the potential health effects of environmental exposure to chemicals. He served as chair for the multinational peer review of the epidemiology program of the U.S.-Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF). Dr. Monson was a member of the scientific committee on Effects of Radiation on the Embryo-Fetus, of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). He served as editor of Cancer Causes and Control from 1993 to 1998. Dr. Monson has more than 150 publications in radiation and occupational epidemiology, including the text Occupational Epidemiology.


James E. Cleaver, Ph.D. (vice chair), is a professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco Cancer Center, with a joint appointment in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. His research interests have focused on the effects of ultraviolet light, internal emitters (tritium and carbon-14), radon, and chemical carcinogens on human cells in culture from patients with mutations in genes involved in DNA repair and genetic instability. He is best known for the discovery that the human disease xeroderma pigmentosum is defective in DNA nucleotide excision repair. Dr. Cleaver is a member of several professional societies including Radiation Research, the American Society for Photobiology, the American Society for Human Genetics, the Environmental Mutagen Society, and the American Association for Cancer Research. He received the Radiation Research Society Research Award, the Senior Investigator Award from the American Society of Photobiology, and the Lila Gruber Award for Cancer Research from the American Academy of Dermatology, the Luigi Provasoli Award from the Phycological Society of America, and the John B. Little Award for radiation research from Harvard University; he was the 47th Faculty Research Lecturer for the University of California San Francisco in 2004. He was elected to the Roll of Honor of the International Union for Research on Cancer, Geneva, in 1997. He was president of the Genetic and Toxicology Association of the Bay area for 1999-2000. He was a member of the NRC Committee on Risk Assessment of Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water. Dr. Cleaver is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).


Herbert L. Abrams, M.D., a faculty member at Stanford Medical School from 1951 to 1967, served as professor of radiology from 1960 to 1967, when he was appointed Philip H. Cook Professor and Chairman of Radiology at Harvard Medical School, as well as chief of radiology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute (1967–1985). He returned to Stanford as professor in 1985. Long interested in the applications and effects of ionizing radiation, he was the first to demonstrate the striking influence of age on the lethality of total-body radiation in mammals (Proc Soc 1951) and, together with H.S. Kaplan, explored the mitigating effects of regional shielding on radiation mortality. His studies of the incidence and distribution of metastases in carcinoma; of the role of lymphography in detection of metastases and of the effects of lymphatic obstruction (NEJM 1965, 1967, 1968); of the altered



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Committee Biographies Richard R. Monson, M.D., Sc.D. (chair), is associate dean pigmentosum is defective in DNA nucleotide excision re- for professional education and professor of epidemiology at pair. Dr. Cleaver is a member of several professional societ- the Harvard University School of Public Health. He earned ies including Radiation Research, the American Society for an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an Sc.D. in epi- Photobiology, the American Society for Human Genetics, demiology and biostatistics from the Harvard School of Pub- the Environmental Mutagen Society, and the American As- lic Health. He was a Fulbright scholar. His research interests sociation for Cancer Research. He received the Radiation in epidemiology include evaluation of the risks of exposure Research Society Research Award, the Senior Investigator to radiation, health effects of exposure to machining fluids, Award from the American Society of Photobiology, and the and potential health effects of environmental exposure to Lila Gruber Award for Cancer Research from the American chemicals. From 1992 through 2004, he was principal inves- Academy of Dermatology, the Luigi Provasoli Award from tigator of a Superfund program project award from the Na- the Phycological Society of America, and the John B. Little tional Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Award for radiation research from Harvard University; he Dr. Monson has served on numerous national and interna- was the 47th Faculty Research Lecturer for the University of tional advisory groups, including two committees of the California San Francisco in 2004. He was elected to the Roll National Research Council (NRC), and on several public and of Honor of the International Union for Research on Cancer, private advisory committees that addressed issues concern- Geneva, in 1997. He was president of the Genetic and Toxi- ing exposure to radiation and the potential health effects of cology Association of the Bay area for 1999-2000. He was a environmental exposure to chemicals. He served as chair for member of the NRC Committee on Risk Assessment of the multinational peer review of the epidemiology program Exposure to Radon in Drinking Water. Dr. Cleaver is a mem- of the U.S.-Japan Radiation Effects Research Foundation ber of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). (RERF). Dr. Monson was a member of the scientific com- mittee on Effects of Radiation on the Embryo-Fetus, of the Herbert L. Abrams, M.D., a faculty member at Stanford National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Medical School from 1951 to 1967, served as professor of (NCRP). He served as editor of Cancer Causes and Control radiology from 1960 to 1967, when he was appointed Philip from 1993 to 1998. Dr. Monson has more than 150 publica- H. Cook Professor and Chairman of Radiology at Harvard tions in radiation and occupational epidemiology, including Medical School, as well as chief of radiology at Brigham the text Occupational Epidemiology. and Women’s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute (1967–1985). He returned to Stanford as professor in 1985. James E. Cleaver, Ph.D. (vice chair), is a professor of der- Long interested in the applications and effects of ionizing matology at the University of California, San Francisco Can- radiation, he was the first to demonstrate the striking influ- cer Center, with a joint appointment in the Department of ence of age on the lethality of total-body radiation in mam- Pharmaceutical Chemistry. His research interests have fo- mals (Proc Soc 1951) and, together with H.S. Kaplan, ex- cused on the effects of ultraviolet light, internal emitters (tri- plored the mitigating effects of regional shielding on tium and carbon-14), radon, and chemical carcinogens on radiation mortality. His studies of the incidence and distri- human cells in culture from patients with mutations in genes bution of metastases in carcinoma; of the role of lymphogra- involved in DNA repair and genetic instability. He is best phy in detection of metastases and of the effects of lym- known for the discovery that the human disease xeroderma phatic obstruction (NEJM 1965, 1967, 1968); of the altered 379

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380 COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES response to pharmacologic agents of the tumor vascular bed istration. She was the first recipient of the William Lloyd in animals and humans (Nature 1964; Cancer Research Award for occupational safety. Throughout her career, 1979); of renal, adrenal, hepatic, pancreatic, colon, and Dr. Bingham has served on numerous national and interna- splenic tumors (1951, 1964, 1965, 1980, 1982, 1983); and of tional advisory groups, including advisory committees of the the reasons for and effects of overutilization (NEJM 1979) NRC, the NAS, the Food and Drug Administration, Depart- and underutilization of X-rays (NEJM 1984) have appeared ment of Labor, National Institute for Occupational Safety in major journals over the years. Dr. Abrams served as a and Health, NIH, Natural Resources Defense Council, and member of the Radiation Study Section of the National Insti- the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). tutes of Health (NIH); a member of the Institute of Medicine The committees addressed issues concerning research needs (IOM) Planning Committee for the Symposium on the Medi- in health risk assessment and the potential health effects of cal Implications of Nuclear War (1985); as one of the four environmental exposure to chemicals. In 1989, Dr. Bingham physician members of the congressionally mandated Na- was elected to the IOM. tional Council on Health Care Technology and as co-chair of its Methods Section (1986-1990); as chairman of the NIH Patricia A. Buffler, Ph.D., is professor of epidemiology and Consensus Conference on Magnetic Resonance Imaging the Kenneth and Marjorie Kaiser Chair of Cancer Epidemi- (1987); as a consultant to the Presidential Advisory Com- ology at the University of California, Berkeley, School of mittee on Human Radiation Experiments; and as one of two Public Health. Her current research interests in epidemiol- American members of the International Blue Ribbon Panel ogy include studies of leukemia in children, health effects of on the future of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation exposure to tobacco smoke, and health effects of nonioniz- in Hiroshima (1996). His examinations of the “Medical Prob- ing radiation. She has served on numerous national and in- lem of Survivors of Nuclear War” (NEJM 1981); “Medical ternational advisory groups including advisory committees Resources After Nuclear War: Availability vs Need” (JAMA to the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, 1984); “Nuclear Radiation in Warfare” (XV Berzelius Sym- the Department of Health and Human Services, the Environ- posium 1988); “The Fallout from Chernobyl” (The Bulle- mental Protection Agency, the University of California Of- tin); “Human Reliability and Safety in the Handling of fice of the President, the National Research Council and the Nuclear Weapons” (Science and Global Security 1991); and World Health Organization (WHO). From 1996 to 2002 she “Security Issues in the Handling and Disposition of Fission- served as a visiting director for the U.S.-Japan RERF. She able Materials” (1993) and other related subjects have been has served as president of the Society of Epidemiologic published in numerous journals and four multiauthored Research, the American College of Epidemiology, and the books. A member of the IOM since 1980, he is also an Hon- International Society for Environmental Epidemiology and orary Fellow of the Royal Society of Radiology of Great as an officer of the Medical Sciences Council of the Ameri- Britain and the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland. The can Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). author of more thean 200 articles, he has also written and/or She was awarded the American College of Epidemiology edited eight books on health policy, technology assessment, Lilienfeld Award in 1996 and the James Bruce Award in and the clinical and pathophysiologic aspects of cardiovas- Preventive Medicine from the American College of Physi- cular disease. The Crookshank Lecturer of the Royal Col- cians in 1999. She is a fellow of both the American College lege of Radiology in 1981 and the Caldwell Lecturer of the of Epidemiology and AAAS and is a member of the IOM. American Roentgen Ray Society in 1982, he was also the recipient of the Gold Medal of the Association of University Elisabeth Cardis, Ph.D., currently runs the Radiation Group Radiologists in 1984 and the Gold Medal of the Radiological at the IARC, where she was previously chief of the Unit of Society of North America in 1996. In 1998, he presented the Radiation and Cancer and head of the Radiation Programme. Charles Dotter Memorial Lecture of the American Heart She is responsible for the planning, conduct, and analyses of Association. He was the founding vice-president of Interna- numerous epidemiologic studies of cancer in relation to ex- tional Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, recipi- posure to radiation—both ionizing and nonionizing. She has ent of the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize. Currently, his time is been consultant to the United Nations Scientific Committee divided between his work in radiology at the medical school on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). She is cur- and his activities as a member-in-residence of the Stanford rently a member of the Steering Committee for the EMF-Net Center for International Security and Cooperation. project; of the International Advisory Committee for the WHO International EMF Project; and of the Scientific Coun- Eula Bingham, Ph.D., is a professor of environmental cil of the French Agence Française pour la Sécurité Sanitaire health at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Bingham’s inter- et Environnementale. She is a fellow of the Institute of Phys- ests include risk assessment, regulatory toxicology, environ- ics. She was a member of the International Commission for mental carcinogenesis, and occupational health surveillance. Non-ionizing Radiation Protection Standing Committee on She was a volunteer investigator at NIEHS and an Assistant Epidemiology from 1998 to 2002 and has been a correspond- Secretary of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Admin- ing member since then. She is also a member of the Scien-

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COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES 381 tific Council for the Joint Congress of the International Soci- and breast cancer. Recently this work has expanded to in- ety for Environmental Epidemiology and the International clude investigations of the effects of exposure to light-at- Society for Exposure Assessment (ISEE-ISEA), Paris 2006, night and circadian disruption on melatonin and reproduc- and was a member of the Scientific Council for the 6th Inter- tive hormones important in the etiology of breast and other national Conference on High Levels of Natural Radiation hormone-related cancers. He has also maintained a long- and Radon Areas (Osaka, September 2004) and of the Inter- standing interest in the etiology of leukemias and lympho- national Programme Committee for the 11th International mas and has directed epidemiologic studies of Hodgkin’s Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) Congress, Madrid disease, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. 2004. She has been responsible for numerous projects sup- Dr. Davis was a Special Fellow of the Leukemia Society of ported currently or previously under the European America from 1986 to 1987 and the recipient of a Research Commission’s Quality of Life, Radiation Protection, and Career Development Award from the National Cancer Insti- INCO-Copernicus Programmes. tute (NCI) from 1988 to 1993. He is an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society and a fellow of the Roger Cox, Ph.D., is director of the National Radiological American College of Epidemiology. He was recently elected Protection Board (NRPB) at Chilton, Oxfordshire. He was a member (academician) of the Russian Academy of Medi- formerly division head and head of the Radiation Effects cal Sciences. Department. After his Ph.D. research in microbial genetics, he joined the MRC Radiobiology Unit at Harwell in 1971 William C. Dewey, Ph.D., is emeritus professor of radiation where he was involved in cellular and molecular research oncology, University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). relating to postirradiation repair, mutagenesis, and tumor From 1981 to 2004 when he retired, he was director of the development. At NRPB (1990–) he has continued to pursue Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory at UCSF. Dr. personal research interests in the mechanisms and genetics Dewey earned his doctorate in radiation biology from the of radiation tumorigenesis. Roger Cox is involved in the University of Rochester in 1958. He was a faculty member work of a variety of national and international committees of the University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical considering radiation effects and radiological protection. Sciences at M.D. Anderson Hospital in Houston, Texas These include the NRPB Advisory Group on Ionizing Ra- (1958–1965), and of the Department of Radiology and Ra- diation (1995–), the International Commission on Radiologi- diation Biology, Colorado State University (1965–1981). He cal Protection (ICRP; 1989–), and UNSCEAR (1989–1993 served as president of the Radiation Research Society in and 1996–). 1979 and was Failla lecturer of that society in 1989. Dr. Dewey was program chairman for the Ninth International Scott Davis, Ph.D., is professor and chairman of the Depart- Congress of Radiation Research in 1991, and chairman and ment of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health and organizer of Third International Symposium: Cancer Community Medicine at the University of Washington and a Therapy by Hyperthermia, Drugs and Radiation in 1980. He full member in the Program in Epidemiology of the Division is the author and coauthor of 264 publications mainly on the of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer effects of radiation and hyperthermia on mammalian cells in Research Center, Seattle, Washington. He obtained his un- culture. He received the Andrew G. Clark research award in dergraduate degree in biology and chemistry from the Uni- 1977 and was an American Society for Therapeutic Radiol- versity of New Mexico, a master of science in community ogy and Oncology (ASTRO) gold medal recipient in 1998. health from the University of Rochester, and a Ph.D. in epi- Dr. Dewey is known, in part, for his studies of the effects of demiology from the University of Washington. He served as radiation and hyperthermia on synchronous cell populations a research associate in epidemiology at RERF in Hiroshima, and for the number of investigators in the radiation biology Japan, from 1983 to 1985. His primary research focus is ra- community who trained in his laboratory. diation epidemiology. For more than a decade he has di- rected two major research activities investigating the effects Ethel S. Gilbert, Ph.D., is a biostatistician in the Radiation of ionizing radiation on human health. One is a series of Epidemiology Branch of NCI. She holds a B.A. in math- studies in the Russian Federation of the effects of exposure ematics from Oberlin College and an M.P.H. and Ph.D. in to radiation from the Chernobyl Power Station. These stud- biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Her current ies have focused on the risk of thyroid cancer and leukemia research includes studies of workers at the Mayak nuclear among children in the Bryansk Oblast. The second is a long- plant in Russia, studies of second cancers after radio- and term follow-up study of thyroid disease in persons exposed chemotherapy, and radiation risk assessment. Formerly, Dr. to atmospheric releases of radiation from the Hanford Site in Gilbert spent several years as a senior staff scientist at Pa- eastern Washington State (the Hanford Thyroid Disease cific Northwest National Laboratories, where her research Study). He has conducted several epidemiologic studies of focused on epidemiologic studies of nuclear workers, includ- the possible health effects associated with exposure to power ing combined analyses of national and international data. frequency magnetic fields, focusing on the risk of leukemia Dr. Gilbert is a fellow of the American Statistical Associa-

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382 COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES tion, and a member of the NCRP, and she served on the research concerns science and risk communication, particu- BEIR VI committee. larly effective methods for earning trust and explaining com- plex science. Her scholarship on these topics appears in more Albrecht Kellerer, Ph.D., is professor emeritus at the Uni- than 40 journals and edited books. She has presented lec- versity of Munich. He was formerly professor of radiation tures, briefings, and workshops on science communication biophysics at Columbia University in New York, and subse- and risk communication for organizations such as the Insti- quently professor and chief of the institute for medical radia- tute of Medicine, the National Library of Medicine, the staff tion research at the University of Wurzburg. Dr. Kellerer’s of the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, research specialties include microdosimetry, radiation risk the National Academy of Sciences, Health Canada, Dow assessment, and radiobiology. Dr. Kellerer was a member of Elanco, Portland Cement, and the U.S. Environmental Pro- the German National Commission for Radiation Protection tection Agency. Her risk communication consulting clients and a member of committees of ICRU and ICRP. have included the NIH, the National Library of Medicine, the National Safety Council, and the University of Wisconsin Daniel Krewski, Ph.D., M.H.A., is professor of medicine in connection with a grant from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory and of epidemiology and community medicine at the Uni- Commission. In 1999, she was selected as a journalism versity of Ottawa, where he serves as director of the fellow by the American Society of Newspaper Editors. McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment. He received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in mathematics and statis- K. Sankaranarayanan, Ph.D., is a professor emeritus in tics from Carleton University and his M.H.A. in health ad- the Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medi- ministration from the University of Ottawa. Dr. Krewski cal Centre, Sylvius Laboratories, Leiden, in the Netherlands. served on the NRC’s Committee on the Biological Effects of Dr. Sankaranarayanan’s research activities include under- Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI) and is a member of the Board standing the adverse effects of radiation and chemical mu- on Radiation Effects Research. He chaired the NRC’s Com- tagens and the use of this knowledge for the assessment of mittee on Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Highly Haz- biological, especially hereditary, risks associated with the ardous Substances from 1998 to 2004, and currently chairs exposure of humans to these agents. He was a consultant in the NRC’s Committee on Toxicity Testing and Assessment genetics to UNSCEAR (1970–2001) and a member of Environmental Agents. Dr. Krewski has contributed to of Committee 1 of the ICRP (1975–2004). In the late 1990s, the publication of more than 500 scientific and technical ar- he chaired an ICRP Task Group on Risk Estimation for ticles in the areas of population health risk assessment, epi- Multifactorial Diseases. Since the late 1960s, he has demiology, and biostatistics. served the journal Mutation Research in several editorial capacities (including executive managing editor) until he Tomas Lindahl, M.D., obtained his early training in medi- stepped down from the editorship in 2000. cine and research at the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm. After postdoctoral training at Princeton and Rockefeller Daniel W. Schafer, Ph.D., received his master’s and Ph.D. Universities, he returned to Stockholm in 1969 as an assis- in statistics from the University of Chicago. Dr. Schafer is a tant professor at the Karolinska Institute. Dr. Lindahl is cur- professor in the Department of Statistics at Oregon State rently director of the Cancer Research UK Clare Hall Labo- University. His expertise includes measurement errors and ratories in London. The laboratories have 12 research groups generalized linear models. Dr. Schafer is a fellow of the working on DNA repair, recombination, and replication, as American Statistical Association and a past president of the well as cell cycle control and transcription. Dr. Lindahl’s Oregon Chapter of the American Statistical Association. He main contributions have been in the field of DNA repair, was scientific adviser to the NCI and the Centers for Disease where he discovered the family of DNA glycosylases and Control and Prevention for updating radiologic properties of the base excision-repair pathway as well as the unique sui- causation tables (1998–2000). Dr. Schafer is coauthor of the cide enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and textbook The Statistical Sleuth, A Course in Methods of Data DNA dioxygenases for reversal of DNA damage. He also Analysis. discovered the mammalian DNA ligases and defined their distinct roles. Dr. Lindahl is a fellow of the Royal Society, a Robert Ullrich, Ph.D., is the Barbara Cox Anthony Univer- member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, a for- sity Chair in Oncology at Colorado State University, De- eign member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and partments of Environmental and Radiological Health Sci- Letters, a member of the European Molecular Biology Orga- ences and of Clinical Sciences. Dr. Ullrich earned his Ph.D. nization, and a member of the Academia Europea. from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He was formerly head of the Radiation Carcino- Katherine E. Rowan, Ph.D. (Purdue University, 1985), is genesis Unit at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. He is professor and associate chair of the Department of Commu- the current president of the Radiation Research Society. He nication at George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia. Her received the R.J. Michael Fry Research Award of the Radia-

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COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES 383 tion Research Society in 1987. Dr. Ullrich has served on the NRC Panel on Space Radiation Effects, a number of NIH advisory committees, and ICRP Committee 1 and the Task Group on Estimates of Radiation-Induced Cancer at Low Doses.

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