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Appendix B
Committee Biographies

James E. Womack (chair) is a distinguished professor and the director of the Center for Animal Biotechnology and Genomics at Texas A&M University. He received his BS in mathematics education from Abilene Christian College and his PhD in genetics from Oregon State University. His research interest is comparative mammalian genomics, particularly comparative mapping of the bovine genome and the genomes of humans and mice. He launched the discipline of livestock genomics with his initial map of the bovine genome and the demonstration of extensive chromosomal conservation in cattle, humans, and mice. His international leadership resulted in a comprehensive bovine linkage map and the first genetic mapping of economically important traits in cattle. Dr. Womack is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received numerous awards, including the CIBA Prize for Research in Animal Health (1993) and the Wolf Prize in Agriculture (2001). He was a member of the National Research Council Steering Committee for Exploring Horizons for Domestic Animal Genomics.


Lynn C. Anderson is executive director of consulting and staffing services at Charles River Laboratories, Inc. She earned her DVM from Iowa State University and is certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Before joining Charles River Laboratories, she was executive director of global research safety and compliance at Merck Research Laboratories, and before that, she held management positions with Amgen and 3M, was an assistant professor of laboratory medicine and pathology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and practiced small-animal medicine. She served as president of the



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Critical Needs for Research in Veterinary Science Appendix B Committee Biographies James E. Womack (chair) is a distinguished professor and the director of the Center for Animal Biotechnology and Genomics at Texas A&M University. He received his BS in mathematics education from Abilene Christian College and his PhD in genetics from Oregon State University. His research interest is comparative mammalian genomics, particularly comparative mapping of the bovine genome and the genomes of humans and mice. He launched the discipline of livestock genomics with his initial map of the bovine genome and the demonstration of extensive chromosomal conservation in cattle, humans, and mice. His international leadership resulted in a comprehensive bovine linkage map and the first genetic mapping of economically important traits in cattle. Dr. Womack is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has received numerous awards, including the CIBA Prize for Research in Animal Health (1993) and the Wolf Prize in Agriculture (2001). He was a member of the National Research Council Steering Committee for Exploring Horizons for Domestic Animal Genomics. Lynn C. Anderson is executive director of consulting and staffing services at Charles River Laboratories, Inc. She earned her DVM from Iowa State University and is certified by the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Before joining Charles River Laboratories, she was executive director of global research safety and compliance at Merck Research Laboratories, and before that, she held management positions with Amgen and 3M, was an assistant professor of laboratory medicine and pathology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and practiced small-animal medicine. She served as president of the

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Critical Needs for Research in Veterinary Science American Association for Laboratory Animal Science, the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and the American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners. She has written numerous scientific and technical publications and presented at many national and international meetings on topics related to the humane care and use of laboratory animals. Leonard S. Bull is professor of animal science and associate director of the Animal and Poultry Waste Management Center at North Carolina State University. He received his BS and MS in dairy science and dairy cattle nutrition, respectively, from Oklahoma State University and his PhD in animal nutrition from Cornell University. His research interests include food-animal production systems; animal nutrition, especially protein and energy metabolism in ruminants; ruminal fiber digestion; and animal-waste management. Dr. Bull served as president of the American Society of Animal Sciences (1997-1998) and vice president of the North American chapter of the World Association for Animal Production (1998-2003). He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Animal Science. He chaired the National Research Council Subcommittee on Nitrogen Usage in Ruminants and served on the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources (1995-1997). Charles C. Capen is a distinguished university professor in the Department of Veterinary Biosciences at Ohio State University. He has chaired his department (the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology until the integrated Department of Veterinary Biosciences was established in 1994) since 1982 and was acting chair for a year before that. He joined the faculty in 1965 after serving as an instructor for 5 years while pursuing his PhD in veterinary pathology. He also earned his MS at Ohio State University and his DVM at Washington State University. Dr. Capen is renowned for his work in the use of animal models to study human diseases and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1992. He has received dozens of honors, including being named a distinguished member of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists—one of only 22 diplomates of 1,300 in the college to receive such a designation. He also received Ohio State’s Distinguished Scholar Award in 1993. He served on the National Research Council Committee on Review of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Zoological Park and the committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion. Norman F. Cheville is retired dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine and Clarence Hartley Covault Distinguished Professor at Iowa State University. He received his DVM from Iowa State University, his PhD from the University of Wisconsin, and a Doctor Honoris Causa from the University of Liege. He chaired the Department of Veterinary Pathology at Iowa State University from 1995 to 2000. Before joining Iowa State University, he was chief of pathology (1964-1989) and of the Brucellosis Research Unit (1989-1995) at the National Animal

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Critical Needs for Research in Veterinary Science Disease Center. Dr. Cheville’s expertise is in pathogenesis and cytopathology. He has received many awards and honors, including the American Feed Industry Award for Outstanding Research from the American Veterinary Medical Foundation (2001), the Pfizer Award for research in bovine disease from the American Veterinary Medical Association Foundation (1998), and the Outstanding Achievement Award from the US Department of Agriculture (1991). He has served on the National Research Ccouncil Committee on Ungulate Management in Yellowstone National Park and Study on Brucellosis in the Greater Yellowstone Area. Peter Daszak is executive director of the Consortium for Conservation Medicine, a collaborative partnership between Harvard Medical School’s Center for Health and the Global Environment, the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Tufts University’s School of Veterinary Medicine, the US Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center, and the Wildlife Trust. He directs the consortium’s programs in research, education, policy, and practical conservation. He earned a BSc in zoology and a PhD in parasitology. His research focuses on the taxonomy, pathology, and conservation impact of parasitic diseases, particularly those of nonmammalian vertebrates and invertebrates. In collaboration with groups in Britain, Australia, and the United States, he discovered a previously unknown fungal disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis, which is a major cause of frog population declines globally and may be transmitted by bullfrogs. The discovery highlights the link between global trade and disease emergence, a process known as pathogen pollution. Dr. Daszak has adjunct positions at three American and two British universities. He has served on committees of the World Conservation Union and the World Health Organization and has advised an array of government, commercial, and noncommercial organizations. Dr. Daszak has received a number of awards, including the 2000 CSIRO Medal for collaborative work on chytridiomycosis. W. Jean Dodds is founder and president of Hemopet, the first nonprofit national blood bank program for animals. She received her DVM with honors from the Ontario Veterinary College, University of Toronto. In 1965, she accepted a position with the New York State Health Department in Albany, and she was later promoted to chief of the Laboratory of Hematology at the Wadsworth Center. In 1980, she became executive director of the New York State Council on Human Blood and Transfusion Services. Dr. Dodds has been a grantee of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and has over 150 research publications. She was formerly president of the Scientist’s Center for Animal Welfare and chairman of the Committee on Veterinary Medical Sciences and vice chair of the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources. She was also the editor of Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine. Her awards include Outstanding Woman Veterinarian of the Year; American Veterinary Medical Association’s Award for Outstanding Service to the Veterinary Profession, American Animal Hospital

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Critical Needs for Research in Veterinary Science Association; Gaines Fido Award as Dogdom’s Woman of the Year; Award of Merit in Recognition of Special Contributions to the Veterinary Profession, American Animal Hospital Association; Centennial Medal of the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine; and Holistic Veterinarian of the Year Award of the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association. She was elected distinguished practitioner of the National Academy of Practice in Veterinary Medicine. In 1986, she moved to southern California to establish Hemopet, and she is expanding Hemopet’s nonprofit services and educational activities. David R. Franz is chief biological scientist at the Midwest Research Institute and director of the National Agricultural Biosecurity Center at Kansas State University. He served in the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command for 23 of his 27 years on active duty. Dr. Franz has served as deputy commander and commander of the US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and as deputy commander of the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. Before joining the command, he served as group veterinarian for the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne). Dr. Franz was technical editor of the Textbook of Military Medicine on Chemical and Biological Defense and has been an invited speaker at many nationally and internationally recognized organizations. He served on the National Research Council Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals. He is serving on the National Research Council Committee on Genomics Databases for Bioterrorism Threat Agents and Committee to Review Research Proposals from Former Soviet Biological Weapons Institutes, which he chairs. Dr. Franz holds a DVM from Kansas State University and a PhD in physiology from Baylor College of Medicine. Michael P. Doyle is regents professor of food microbiology and director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety at the University of Georgia. Before joining the University of Georgia, he was a distinguished professor of food microbiology and toxicology at the University of Wisconsin. In 1993, Dr. Doyle established the Center for Food Safety. He developed a research program that promotes collaboration among the food industry, universities, and federal and state agencies. His research focuses on developing methods to detect and control foodborne bacterial pathogens at all levels of the food continuum from farm to table. He is an authority on foodborne pathogens, especially Escherichia coli O157:H7. John A. Shadduck is president of Shadduck Consulting LLC. He received his DVM, MSc, and PhD in veterinary pathology from Ohio State University. He pursued an academic career in colleges of veterinary medicine at Ohio State University, the University of Illinois, and Texas A&M University, where he was named dean emeritus. He also was on the faculty of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Dr. Shadduck was chief executive officer of Optibrand Ltd., LLC and executive vice president of Heska Corporation. He is

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Critical Needs for Research in Veterinary Science a past president and a distinguished member of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists. He was a member of the National Research Council Panel on Animal Health and Veterinary Medicine, which he chaired in 1996-1997. Darcy H. Shaw is a professor of small-animal internal medicine and chair of the Department of Companion Animals at the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) of the University of Prince Edward Island. He received his DVM and MVSc from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, and his MBA in educational administration from Royal Roads University, Canada. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. His research interests include the role of the kidney in acid-base balance, mechanisms of progressive renal failure, and the role of cytokines in renal interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Dr. Shaw was president of the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (2000-2001). He has been service chief of small animal medicine and director of the AVC Veterinary Teaching Hospital (1992-1994). David E. Swayne is laboratory director and supervisory veterinary medical officer at the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Research Service. He leads a team of experts in studying exotic and emerging poultry viral diseases, including the H5 subtype of avian influenza virus. He received USDA’s Secretary’s Group Award and the Silver Plow Award for research that advanced the understanding of the pathobiology and epidemiology of Hong Kong H5N1 avian influenza and development of strategies to protect US poultry. He served on the Board of Governors of the American College of Poultry Veterinarians (ACPV) and the Board of Directors of the American Association of Avian Pathologists. Dr. Swayne received his BS in domestic-animal biology from the University of Arkansas, his DVM and MS in veterinary pathology from the University of Missouri, and his PhD in veterinary pathology from the University of Georgia. He is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and of ACPV. Ravi J Tolwani is an associate professor and director of postdoctoral training in laboratory animal and comparative medicine in the Department of Comparative Medicine at Stanford University. He received his DVM from Auburn University and PhD in molecular and cellular pathology from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. He is a diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. Dr. Tolwani maintains an active research program that focuses on understanding the molecular mechanisms of plasticity in the nervous system and developing new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. He is associate editor of Comparative Medicine and has served on the Board of Directors of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. He received the Young Investigator Award from the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science in 1999 and the Special Emphasis Research Career Award from the National Institutes of Health in 1998.

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