Appendixes



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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea Appendixes

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea A Committee and Staff Biographies Harry W. Jenkins, Jr., retired from the U.S. Marine Corps with the rank of major general. He is the director of business development and congressional liaison at ITT Industries, where he is responsible for activities in support of tactical communications systems and airborne electronic warfare systems with the Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, National Guard, and appropriate committees in Congress. General Jenkins’s background is in expeditionary warfare, particularly in regard to its mission use of command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) systems. During Desert Storm, General Jenkins served as commanding general of the Fourth Marine Expeditionary Brigade, for which he directed operational planning, training, and employment of the ground units, aviation assets, and command-and-control systems in the 17,000-person amphibious force. General Jenkins’s last position before his retirement from the U.S. Marine Corps was as director of expeditionary warfare for the Chief of Naval Operations. In that position he initiated a detailed program for C4I systems improvements for large-deck amphibious ships, as well as managing all programs of naval mine warfare and reorganizing the Navy’s unmanned aerial vehicle efforts for operations from aircraft carriers and amphibious ships. He is a member of numerous professional societies, including the Marine Corps Association, Marine Corps Aviation Association, Expeditionary Warfare Division of the Naval Defense Industry Association, Navy League, and Adjutant Generals Association of the United States. General Jenkins is a member of the Naval Studies Board. Richard L. Wade is a principal at Exponent; formerly, he was president of Risk Management Sciences, a private consulting firm specializing in risk management

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea and threat assessment. In addition, he is an adjunct associate professor of medicine at the University of California at San Francisco Medical Center. His areas of expertise include the commercial shipping industry, risk mitigation, threat assessment, and environmental and public health issues. Dr. Wade has served as the head of public health agencies (in Seattle, Washington, and for the states of Minnesota and California). In 1990, he received the American Public Health Association’s lifetime achievement award. Dr. Wade is a member of the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board. Jeffery P. Bennett is vice president of logistics management at LMI where he oversees studies and analysis for the Office of the Secretary of Defense as well as the individual military Services, for the Department of Homeland Security, and for other federal government agencies. His expertise is in supply chain management, cost and resource analysis, strategic logistics, operations research, and in naval logistics and underway replenishment operations. Mr. Bennett spent much of his career in Department of Defense (DOD) programming and budgeting organizations; he was a member of the Senior Executive Service and served as director of the Force and Infrastructure Cost Analysis Division (FICAD) for the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Program Analysis and Evaluation. Mr. Bennett led FICAD studies and analysis supporting independent cost estimates for the DOD Cost and Improvement Group, defense-wide budget and program reviews, and the first Quadrennial Defense Review. He earned his commission in the Navy through the Navy Enlisted Scientific and Education Program, graduating from the University of Washington with a B.S. in mathematics and later receiving his M.S. (with distinction) in operations research from the Naval Postgraduate School, accompanied by the Military Operations Research Society Graduate Research Award. Alan Berman is an independent consultant, with current clients including the Applied Research Laboratory of Pennsylvania State University (ARL/PSU) and the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA). Dr. Berman’s expertise includes analyses of Navy research and development investments, space operations capabilities, information operations, and command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (C4ISR) programs. Dr. Berman served as dean of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, where he was responsible for the graduate programs in physical oceanography, marine biology, geology, geophysics, applied ocean science, and underwater acoustics. He also served as director of research at the Naval Research Laboratory, where he administered broad programs in basic and applied research. Dr. Berman has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees, including the recent Defense Science Board Task Force on Sea Basing.

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea Paul Bevilaqua is chief engineer of advanced development projects for Skunk Works at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. He joined Lockheed Martin as chief aeronautical scientist and has spent much of his career developing vertical-takeoff-and-landing (VTOL) aircraft as well as playing a leading role in creating the Joint Strike Fighter program. He invented the lift fan propulsion system that made it possible to build stealthy, supersonic VTOL aircraft, and led the engineering team that demonstrated the feasibility of building variants of this aircraft for the Air Force, Marine Corps, and Royal Navy. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Dr. Bevilaqua was manager of advanced programs at Rockwell International’s Navy aircraft plant, where he led teams designing short-takeoff, vertical-lift interceptor aircraft and VTOL carrier-onboard-delivery aircraft. He served as deputy director of the Energy Conversion Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. He has a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from Purdue University. E. Richard Diamond, Jr., is senior manager of strategic assessments at Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems. His background is in senior-level war-gaming and simulations management with the Joint Staff, Naval War College, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), and various defense agencies. Mr. Diamond joined Hughes Aircraft Company and then moved to Raytheon following a career in the U.S. Navy, from which he retired with the rank of captain. At sea, he served on frigates, destroyers, cruisers, and aircraft carriers. He commanded the frigate USS Kirk and the Aegis cruiser USS Bunker Hill, both forward homeported in Yokosuka, Japan. Ashore, he founded the Chief of Naval Operations’ first Joint Operations and Doctrine Branch, headed the Strategic Concepts Branch, and initiated the post-Cold War strategic reviews, which produced the U.S. Navy’s future vision statements, … From the Sea and Forward … From the Sea. Mr. Diamond is a graduate of the University of Dallas, Tulane University Graduate School, and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. He attended Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and Tuft University’s Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy as a federal executive fellow. Mr. Diamond is currently an adjunct fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Steven W. Flohr retired from the U.S. Army with the rank of brigadier general. He is an independent consultant on defense, technical, and program management issues. General Flohr’s background is in the testing and evaluation of military systems, including those for joint operations, in defense and other government agencies and for industry and foreign customers. His last active duty assignment was as commanding general at White Sands Missile Range, where he directed missile range operations and installation activities to provide testing and evaluation for the joint Services. He served on the National Research Council (NRC)

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea Committee on Assessment of Test Infrastructure Requirements to Support Operational Testing of Defense Directed Energy Systems. General Flohr received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Nebraska and his M.B.A. from the Florida Institute of Technology. Wesley L. Harris is the Charles Stark Draper Professor and head of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). His expertise is in fluid mechanics; aerodynamics; unsteady, nonlinear aerodynamics, acoustics; lean manufacturing processes; and military logistics and sustainment. Dr. Harris’s background also includes managing major national and international aeronautical and aviation programs and personnel in the executive branch of the federal government. Prior to coming to MIT, he served as associate administrator for aeronautics at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and vice president and chief administrative officer of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. Dr. Harris earned a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. George B. Harrison retired from the U.S. Air Force with the rank of major general. He is director of research operations at Georgia Tech Research Institute, where he oversees sponsored research in aerospace, transportation, electronic systems, sensors, electronic combat, signature technology, information technology, and electro-optical applications. His background is in military operations, particularly in regard to air operations for the joint Services. Specifically, he commanded U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy and French and British forces enforcing post-Desert Storm sanctions against Iraq. General Harrison received his B.S. degree in general engineering and public policy from the U.S. Air Force Academy and an M.B.A. in industrial management from the University of Pennsylvania. He has participated in the program for senior executives in national and international security at Harvard University. Kevin F. Kelly is the director of strategic planning and advanced programs at Northrop Grumman Ship Systems. He is a retired naval officer with a background in operations, engineering, command-and-control systems with open architecture considerations, and future ship designs with an emphasis on the Navy’s Sea Basing concept. Mr. Kelly received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and had 25 years of commissioned and enlisted service before beginning his career with Northrop Grumman. He received an M.E. in mechanical engineering from Tulane University and an M.B.A. from William Carey College.

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea Ronald K. Kiss is president of the Webb Institute, a private, 4-year college offering Bachelor of Science degrees in naval architecture and marine engineering. Prior to joining the Webb Institute, he was vice president of SYNTEK, assisting the U.S. Navy on the joint Navy and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency arsenal ship program and on the Navy’s aircraft-carrier and surface-combatant programs. He served as deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for ship programs in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition, and also as executive director of the Amphibious, Auxiliary, Mine, and Sealift Directorate at the Naval Sea Systems Command. Mr. Kiss spent nearly 20 years with the Maritime Administration, completing his service there as acting associate administrator for shipbuilding and ship operations. He holds a B.S. degree in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Webb Institute, an M.S. in naval architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, and has participated in a number of post-graduate programs at institutions including Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. John B. LaPlante retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of vice admiral. He is an independent consultant and former manager of Department of Defense Business Development at McDermott International, Inc., a worldwide energy services company. His background is in naval (and joint) military operations, particularly in regard to operational logistics. Before retiring from the Navy in 1996, Admiral LaPlante served as director for logistics, Joint Staff. His military experience also included assignments as commander of the Naval Logistics Command Pacific and head of the Amphibious Warfare Branch in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. During Desert Storm and Desert Shield, he commanded all amphibious forces in the Gulf region, a force of some 43 ships and 34,000 men and women. Henry S. Marcus is professor of marine systems in the Ocean Engineering Department at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is chairman of the graduate program in ocean systems management and also served as chairman of the earlier MIT program in shipping and shipbuilding management. Dr. Marcus’s expertise is in marine systems, marine transportation, ocean systems management, shipping, and shipbuilding management. He held the title of Naval Sea Systems Command Professor of Ship Acquisition for a decade and served on numerous committees related to maritime transportation sponsored by the NRC. Dr. Marcus served as a member of the Marine Transportation System National Advisory Council and the Federal Transportation Advisory Group. His most recent book, Intermodal Movement of Marine Containers, deals with the impact of new technology on the marine industry—case studies on ports, ocean carriers, and railroads analyze how technology brings about changes in strategy and com-

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea petitive structure within the industry. Dr. Marcus has a B.S. degree from the Webb Institute, two M.S. degrees from MIT, and a Ph.D. from Harvard Business School. Irwin Mendelson, retired president of the Engineering Division of Pratt & Whitney, is a mechanical engineer by education and training. His background is primarily in commercial and military aircraft engine design, with earlier experience in submarine design. At Pratt & Whitney, Mr. Mendelson managed a staff of 8,000 and oversaw a budget of $900 million. He was responsible for the total operation of the division, including the design, development, and installation of all aircraft engine systems. At Electric Boat, he had been responsible for major mechanical systems and components, including propulsion, missile and torpedo launch, and steering and diving controls. Mr. Mendelson received his B.S. from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and his M.S. from the University of Connecticut. William B. Morgan retired after having spent his professional career at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division (formerly the David Taylor Research Center). He retired as head of the Hydromechanics Directorate. His expertise is in naval architecture, with a specialty in naval hydrodynamics; ship and submarine design, including seakeeping, maneuverability, cavitation, and control; design and development of advanced marine propulsors of all types; prediction of full-scale performance from model tests and computations; advanced hydrodynamic testing techniques and facilities and advanced computational techniques; and validation and certification of these various testing and computational techniques. Dr. Morgan has authored and coauthored numerous papers and reports dealing with a wide variety of subjects in the propulsion area. A member of the National Academy of Engineering, he has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees and is currently a member of the Naval Studies Board. John H. Moxley III is managing director at the North American Health Care Division, Korn/Ferry International. A member of the Institute of Medicine, his expertise is in military medical issues, health science policy, human rights, international health, academic health sciences center policy issues, and the administration of pharmaceutical corporate/industry enterprises, federal government agencies, and hospital and medical centers. Prior to joining Korn/Ferry, he held a number of senior positions in academia, government, and commercial industry, including that of dean of both the University of Maryland and the University of California (San Diego) Medical Schools, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, and senior vice president at American Medical International. He has served on numerous scientific boards and advisory committees,

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea including the American Hospital Association board of trustees, the California Medical Association, the American Medical Association, the National Fund for Medical Education, and the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine. Dr. Moxley is a member of the Naval Studies Board and the Board on Army Science and Technology. Robert G. Sprigg retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of rear admiral. He is currently director of advanced warfare concepts with General Dynamics/Bath Iron Works. His background is in naval aviation, ship handling, and military logistics via joint and coalition support. Admiral Sprigg commanded the USS Camden while it was deployed in Operation Desert Storm/Provide Comfort providing logistical support to eight ships of foreign navies. He has also commanded the USS George Washington, CVN (nuclear-powered aircraft carrier)-73, Carrier Group Two, and the Navy Warfare Development Command. Admiral Sprigg graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy with a B.S. in naval science and earned an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School. Jennifer P. Whitlock is the Boeing Company’s lead design engineer for airplane configuration for the Boeing blended wing body (BWB) subsonic transport program. Her expertise is in aircraft design and its configuration on carriers, the requirements for military cargo and commercial freight, as well as commercial passenger accommodations. Ms. Whitlock has been working with the BWB team since she started at then-McDonnell-Douglas in 1996. In addition, she has worked on the high-speed civil transport, the advanced theater transport, and the sonic cruiser tanker. She holds a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the University of Illinois and an M.S. from Stanford University. Staff Charles F. Draper is acting director of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Naval Studies Board. He joined the NRC in 1997 as program officer, then senior program officer, with the Naval Studies Board and in 2003 became associate director. During his tenure with the Naval Studies Board, Dr. Draper has served as the responsible staff officer on a wide range of topics aimed at helping the Department of the Navy with its scientific, technical, and strategic planning. His recent efforts include topics on network-centric operations, theater missile defense, mine warfare, and nonlethal weapons. Prior to joining the Naval Studies Board, he was the lead mechanical engineer at Sensytech, Inc. (formerly S.T. Research Corporation), where he provided technical and program management support for satellite Earth station and small-satellite design. He received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 1995; his doctoral research was conducted at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), where he used

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Sea Basing: Ensuring Joint Force Access from the Sea an atomic force microscope to measure the nanomechanical properties of thin-film materials. In parallel with his graduate student duties, Dr. Draper was a mechanical engineer with Geo-Centers, Inc., working on-site at NRL on the development of an underwater X-ray backscattering tomography system used for the nondestructive evaluation of U.S. Navy sonar domes on surface ships. Arul Mozhi is senior program officer at the National Research Council’s Naval Studies Board and served as senior program officer at the NRC’s Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design and National Materials Advisory Board. Prior to joining the NRC in 1999, Dr. Mozhi was senior scientist and program manager at UTRON, Inc., a high-tech company in the Washington, D.C., area, working on pulsed electrical and chemical energy technologies applied to materials processing. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Mozhi was a senior engineer and task leader at Roy F. Weston, Inc., a leading environmental consulting company working on long-term nuclear materials behavior and systems engineering related to nuclear waste transport, storage, and disposal in support of the U.S. Department of Energy. Before 1989 he was a materials scientist at Marko Materials, Inc., a high-tech firm in the Boston area, working on rapidly solidified materials. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (the latter in 1986) in materials engineering from the Ohio State University and then served as a postdoctoral research associate there. He received his B.S. in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1982.