Appendix G
Biographical information

Committee Co-chairs

W. DALE COMPTON is the Lillian M. Gilbreth Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering Emeritus at Purdue University. His research interests include materials science, automotive engineering, combustion engineering, materials engineering, manufacturing engineering, and management of technology. From 1986 to 1988, as the first National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Senior Fellow, Dr. Compton directed activities related to industrial issues and engineering education. He came to NAE from the Ford Motor Company, where he was vice president of research. Before that, he was professor of physics and director of the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Dr. Compton has served as a consultant to numerous government and industrial organizations and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society of Automotive Engineers, and Engineering Society of Detroit. He has received the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal from ASME and SME, the University of Illinois College of Engineering Alumni Award for Distinguished Service, and the Science Trailblazers Award from the Detroit Science Center and the Michigan Sesquicentennial Commission. Dr. Compton was elected a member of the NAE in 1981 and is currently NAE home secretary.


JEROME H. GROSSMAN, senior fellow and director of the Harvard/Kennedy School Health Care Delivery Project, is working to develop innovations and reforms in the medical care delivery system. Dr. Grossman is Chairman Emeritus of New England Medical Center, where he served as chairman and CEO from 1979 to 1995, where he founded the Health Institute, a research and development organization that works on problems in the health care system. He is also professor of medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and an Honorary Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he worked full-time from 1966 to 1979. Dr. Grossman was a member of the founding team of several health care companies, including Meditech, a medical software company, and Tufts Associated Health Plan, Chartwell Home Therapies, and Transition Systems Inc., a medical-care information-management company.

Named to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 1984, Dr. Grossman has chaired four committees and been a member of the Committee for Quality of Health Care in America. He was also chair of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Committee on the Impact of Academic Research on Industrial Performance. In 1999, he was appointed to the National Academies Council on Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Dr. Grossman was scholar-in-residence at the IOM in 1996. Dr. Grossman is a director/trustee of a number of organizations, including The Mayo Clinic Foundation, Penn Medicine (University of Pennsylvania Medical School and Health System), Stryker Corporation, Eureka Medical Inc., and Committee for Economic Development.

Committee Members

REBECCA M. BERGMAN, who joined Medtronic 17 years ago, has been a leader in the advancement of biologically oriented sciences. Currently vice president, science and technology, she is responsible for Medtronic’s Materials and Biosciences Center, Technical Knowledge Center, innovation programs, and other corporate technology initiatives. Prior to becoming vice president, Becky held scientific and R&D management positions of increasing responsibility in the corporation. She has received several of Medtronic’s highest honors, including membership in the Bakken Society, an honorary society for Medtronic’s most distinguished scientific and technical contributors, and the Wallin



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 259
Building a Better Delivery System: A New Engineering/Health Care Partnership Appendix G Biographical information Committee Co-chairs W. DALE COMPTON is the Lillian M. Gilbreth Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering Emeritus at Purdue University. His research interests include materials science, automotive engineering, combustion engineering, materials engineering, manufacturing engineering, and management of technology. From 1986 to 1988, as the first National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Senior Fellow, Dr. Compton directed activities related to industrial issues and engineering education. He came to NAE from the Ford Motor Company, where he was vice president of research. Before that, he was professor of physics and director of the Coordinated Sciences Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Dr. Compton has served as a consultant to numerous government and industrial organizations and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society of Automotive Engineers, and Engineering Society of Detroit. He has received the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal from ASME and SME, the University of Illinois College of Engineering Alumni Award for Distinguished Service, and the Science Trailblazers Award from the Detroit Science Center and the Michigan Sesquicentennial Commission. Dr. Compton was elected a member of the NAE in 1981 and is currently NAE home secretary. JEROME H. GROSSMAN, senior fellow and director of the Harvard/Kennedy School Health Care Delivery Project, is working to develop innovations and reforms in the medical care delivery system. Dr. Grossman is Chairman Emeritus of New England Medical Center, where he served as chairman and CEO from 1979 to 1995, where he founded the Health Institute, a research and development organization that works on problems in the health care system. He is also professor of medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and an Honorary Physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he worked full-time from 1966 to 1979. Dr. Grossman was a member of the founding team of several health care companies, including Meditech, a medical software company, and Tufts Associated Health Plan, Chartwell Home Therapies, and Transition Systems Inc., a medical-care information-management company. Named to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences in 1984, Dr. Grossman has chaired four committees and been a member of the Committee for Quality of Health Care in America. He was also chair of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Committee on the Impact of Academic Research on Industrial Performance. In 1999, he was appointed to the National Academies Council on Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. Dr. Grossman was scholar-in-residence at the IOM in 1996. Dr. Grossman is a director/trustee of a number of organizations, including The Mayo Clinic Foundation, Penn Medicine (University of Pennsylvania Medical School and Health System), Stryker Corporation, Eureka Medical Inc., and Committee for Economic Development. Committee Members REBECCA M. BERGMAN, who joined Medtronic 17 years ago, has been a leader in the advancement of biologically oriented sciences. Currently vice president, science and technology, she is responsible for Medtronic’s Materials and Biosciences Center, Technical Knowledge Center, innovation programs, and other corporate technology initiatives. Prior to becoming vice president, Becky held scientific and R&D management positions of increasing responsibility in the corporation. She has received several of Medtronic’s highest honors, including membership in the Bakken Society, an honorary society for Medtronic’s most distinguished scientific and technical contributors, and the Wallin

OCR for page 259
Building a Better Delivery System: A New Engineering/Health Care Partnership Leadership Award. In 2000, Becky played a key role in the development of Medtronic’s “Vision 2010,” a 10-year strategic plan for the corporation. Mrs. Bergman holds a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Princeton University and she has completed graduate studies in chemical engineering and materials science at the University of Minnesota, where she has been an adjunct professor and taught courses in biomedical engineering. Becky is a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. JOHN R. BIRGE is professor of operations management and Neubauer Family Faculty Fellow, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago. Until June 2004, Dr. Birge was dean of the Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science at Northwestern University. His research is focused on the mathematical modeling of systems with uncertainty, stochastic programming, and large-scale optimization as they apply to power systems, finance, transportation, public policy, and manufacturing. He has taught courses on capital budgeting, financial engineering, and operations research. Dr. Birge is a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the Mathematical Programming Society, the Mathematical Association of America, the American Mathematical Society, the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and the Production and Operations Management Society. He has received the Institute of Industrial Engineers Medallion Award, an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, and a National Science Foundation Research Initiation Grant. Dr. Birge was the E. Leonard Arnoff Memorial Lecturer on the Practice of Management Science and Ilyong Ham Distinguished Lecturer at Pennsylvania State University. DENIS CORTESE is president and chief executive officer of Mayo Clinic and a specialist in pulmonary medicine. Prior to this appointment, he was chair of the Board of Governors at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, chair of the Board of Directors at St. Luke’s Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida, and medical director of the Mayo Health Plan in Jacksonville. Dr. Cortese is a member of the Mayo Foundation Board of Trustees and a former member of the Mayo Clinic Rochester Board of Governors. Dr. Cortese served as a lieutenant commander in the U.S. Navy Medical Corps. He is well known for his work in the use of photodynamic therapy in lung cancer and is a director and former president of the International Photodynamic Association. ROBERT S. DITTUS is the Harvie Branscomb Distinguished Professor, Albert and Bernard Werthan Professor of Medicine, Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine and Public Health, Director of the Center for Health Services Research, Director of the Institute for Community Health, and Director of the Center for Improving Patient Safety at Vanderbilt University; director of the Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, and director of the Quality Scholars Program at the Veterans Administration Tennessee Valley Healthcare System. His career has focused on methodologies for improving clinical decision making, the use of simulation modeling to improve clinical and operational decision making, and the use of systems engineering and management-science techniques in clinical medicine and public health to improve the quality, safety, and efficiency of health care delivery. G. SCOTT GAZELLE received his B.A. from Dartmouth College and his M.D. from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. After completing a residency in radiology at University Hospitals of Cleveland, where he was also chief resident, he completed a fellowship in abdominal imaging and interventional radiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH); he subsequently joined the faculty at MGH in the Division of Abdominal Imaging and Interventional Radiology. In 1996, he received an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health, where he majored in health care management. In 1999, he received a Ph.D. in health policy from Harvard University, where he concentrated in decision science. Currently, associate professor in radiology at Harvard Medical School and associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Harvard School of Public Health, Dr. Gazelle is also director of the MGH Institute for Technology Assessment, the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center Program in Cancer Outcomes Research Training, the Technology Assessment and Outcomes Analysis Program of the Partners HealthCare System Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology, and the MGH Clinical Research Support Office. In addition, he is also senior scientist at the Partners Institute for Health Policy, and director of clinical research in the Department of Radiology at MGH. He is past president of the Association of University Radiologists, Radiology Research Alliance, and New England Roentgen Ray Society, and is current chair of the American College of Radiology Commission on Research and Technology Assessment and chair of the RSNA Research Development Committee and a member of the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee. His research is focused on evaluating the benefits, costs, and appropriate uses of new medical technologies. Dr. Gazelle is the author of more than 150 scientific articles and two textbooks. He has also presented numerous papers, lectures, and workshops nationally and internationally. CAROL HARADEN, vice president at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), is a quality of care outcomes researcher, educator, and change leader. At IHI she is responsible for patient safety and idealized design development in medication use, intensive care units, and the flow of patients through the health care system. Dr. Haraden has

OCR for page 259
Building a Better Delivery System: A New Engineering/Health Care Partnership been a dean in higher education, a clinician, a consultant, and a researcher. Prior to joining IHI, she was vice president for quality services at Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, Vermont, where she was responsible for quality improvement, clinical and operational measurement, service excellence, risk management, safety, and organizational development. Dr. Haraden has written several grants and has served as the measurement consultant for a Robert Woods Johnson grant. Carol is a frequent speaker on program evaluation, measurement, and quality improvement and is the author of a chapter in the American Hospital Association publication, Work Redesign. She holds an adjunct appointment at the University of Vermont. RICHARD MIGLIORI, is chief executive officer of United Resource Networks, a specialized care services company within UnitedHealth Group. United Resource Networks provides specialized solutions for complex medical conditions, such as transplantation, cancer, infertility and congenital heart disease. Their “products” include: quantifying specialized medical expertise, providing clinical consultation, and establishing comprehensive, value-driven contracts to help increase patient survival rates while simultaneously lowering costs for corporate America. Dr. Migliori spearheaded the design, organization, and management of national health care delivery networks and led the development of UnitedHealthcare’s Care Coordination Model. Dr. Migliori was previously CEO of HealthSystem Minnesota, one of the largest multispecialty, integrated-care systems in the United States. WOODROW MYERS is the former executive vice president and chief medical officer of WellPoint, where he managed WellPoint’s Health Care Services Division, which includes overseeing medical policy, clinical affairs, and health services operations. He was also responsible for strategic initiatives to enhance the health care experience for WellPoint members and to simplify administration and improve communications with physicians and other health care professionals. Prior to joining WellPoint, Dr. Myers was director of healthcare management at Ford Motor Company. His responsibilities at Ford included addressing quality, cost, and access issues related to health benefits, occupational health, workers compensation, and disability programs. Prior to joining Ford, he was corporate medical director for Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, commissioner of health for the state of Indiana, and commissioner of health for New York City. Dr. Myers was an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California San Francisco and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar and a fellow in critical care medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Myers received an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.B.A. from Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He has received numerous medical and community service awards and has published extensively on medical issues important to public health. WILLIAM P. PIERSKALLA is the former dean and current Distinguished Professor Emeritus of decisions, operations, and technology management at The Anderson Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research interests include the management aspects of health care delivery, operations research, operations management, and global competition. He is a former president of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies, serves on the editorial staffs of five publications, and a recent past vice president for publications for the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences. Dr. Pierskalla has been president of the Operations Research Society of America and is a past editor of Operations Research. At the University of Pennsylvania, he has also been deputy dean for academic affairs, director of the Huntsman Center for Global Competition and Leadership, chair of the Health Care Systems Department in the Wharton School, and executive director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. He has lectured internationally and written more than 50 articles on mathematical programming, transportation, inventory and production control, maintainability, and health care delivery. As a consultant to the American Red Cross, Dr. Pierskalla was involved in analyzing the blood supply management, including delivery, testing, and inventory. STEPHEN M. SHORTELL is dean of the School of Public Health, Blue Cross of California Distinguished Professor of Health Policy and Management, and professor of organization behavior in the School of Public Health and Haas School of Business of the University of California, Berkeley. From 1982 to 1998, he was professor of sociology and A.C. Buehler Distinguished Professor of Health Services Management and a professor of organization behavior in the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. His current research and interests are the strategy, structure, and performance of health care systems; organizational performance; organizational and managerial correlates of continuous quality improvement and health care outcomes; empirical analysis of physician-organizational relationships; and the evaluation of community health demonstration programs. Dr. Shortell is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has received an honorary American Hospital Association Lifetime Member Award, a Gold Medal Award from the American College of Healthcare Executives, a Distinguished Investigator Award from the Association for Health Services Research, the Baxter Health Services Research Prize, and the George R. Terry “Book of the Year” Award from the Academy of Management. KENSALL D. WISE is the William Gould Dow Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Michigan. His work has focused primarily on the development of integrated sensors for

OCR for page 259
Building a Better Delivery System: A New Engineering/Health Care Partnership applications of microelectronics in new areas, including health care and environmental monitoring. He has worked on supporting technologies, such as micromachining, impurity-based etch-stops, wafer bonding, and wafer-level hermetic packaging, as well as on the devices themselves. Dr. Wise has long experience in a number of biomedical devices and has helped pioneer technologies for merging sensing microstructures with integrated circuits. An area of increasing interest in microsystems that combine sensors, microactuators, and signal processing electronics. Dr. Wise is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. DAVID D. WOODS is professor of industrial and systems engineering at Ohio State University and a pioneer in cognitive systems engineering for human-computer decision making and in resilience engineering for safety management. Dr. Woods is past president and a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomic Society and a fellow of the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. He received the Ely Award for best paper in the journal Human Factors (1994) and a Laurels Award from Aviation Week and Space Technology (1995) for research on the human factors of highly automated cockpits. As a board member of the National Patient Safety Foundation (1996-2002) and associate director of the Midwest Center for Inquiry on Patient Safety of the Veterans Health Administration (1999-2003), he has worked extensively on the interaction of engineering and health care. He is coauthor of Behind Human Error (1994), A Tale of Two Stories: Contrasting Views of Patient Safety (1998), and Resilience Engineering (2005). Dr. Woods has also investigated accidents in nuclear power, aviation, space, and anesthesiology and was an advisor to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.